Spring 2024

January 16, 2024—April 30, 2024

All three-credit courses will include 9 ½ hours of out-of-class instructional time delineated in the course syllabus. This is in addition to the regularly scheduled 14 two-hour class sessions.

Bank Street Graduate School of Education credit hour calculations for degree and certificate programs follow NYSED guidelines, which are based on the U.S. Department of Education’s definition of credit hour. Please view the Credit Hour Assignment Policy for more information.

Religious Observance: The College respects individuals’ religious observances. If you are unable to make any class session, including a Friday session, because of religious observance, please notify the course instructor by the first class session so that an alternative means can be identified for fulfilling missed class material and course assignments.

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Room Abbreviations
TBA: Room will be in person at 112, announced prior to the start of classes
Online: Course is fully online
Offsite: Course takes place offsite

CDR: Children's Dining Room
AUD: The Evelyn Rome Tabas and Daniel Tabas Auditorium

January Intersession

These courses are offered during our January Intersession, and run January 2, 2024—January 12, 2024, prior to the start of Spring 2024 classes. Students who wish to register need to do so prior to the start of the course.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
EDUC606-1 Block Building and Dramatic Play as an Integral Part of the Early Childhood Curriculum 1 Offsite Elise Bauer 1/3-1/10 MWF 4:45-8:00PM 1/3, 1/5, 1/8, 1/10
This course introduces block building and dramatic play as experiences that are central to learning in the early child-hood curriculum. We will explore the ways block building supports children’s physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development. Participants will think about how children explore the physical properties of blocks, explore blocks to represent and learn about the world around them, and create symbolic stories related to their structures. Participants will build with blocks and consider questions related to setting up a block area, developmental expectations, and the role of blocks in curriculum planning, as well as gender and inclusion considerations.
Note: This course will meet off-campus at the City and Country School 146 W 13th St, New York, NY.
EDUC865-1 Children’s Literature for Grades 3 – 6 1 Mollie Welsh Kruger 1/2-1/11 TTh 4:45-8:00PM 1/2, 1/4, 1/9, 1/11
This course serves as an introduction to some of the impor-tant ideas involved in selecting and using literature appropriate to children in grades 3–6. The function and meaning of “story” and/or “narrative” in oral tradition and written literature are organizing concepts in this course. Students will participate in discussion and workshop activities and use their own responses, criteria from the field of literary criticism, and principles of child development to discuss ways of deepening children’s connections with literature. Prerequisite: EDUC 564 or permission of instructor.
EDUC866-1 A Developmental-Interaction Approach to Teaching Geography in the Upper-Elementary Grades 1 Ellen McCrum 1/4-1/11 TTh 4:45-9:00PM 1/4, 1/9, 1/11 Cancelled
This course will focus on the role of language and experience in learning geography and how geography and map skills support social studies. Through active learning experiences, students will come to a deeper understanding of the underlying geographic concepts and vocabulary that are central to the course. Specific reference will be made to how the active and concrete teaching techniques used in the course, many of which were first developed by Lucy Sprague Mitchell, can foster learning among a wide range of learners. Dialogues that incorporate the vocabulary of geography will occur as students actively engage in terrain building and map making; specific reference will also be made to the value of such experiences in promoting both conceptual and vocabulary development among students who are English Language Learners. Prerequisite: EDUC 510 or EDUC 514.
The remaining 12.75 hours of instruction will occur through asynchronous engagement.
Prerequisite for EDUC866: EDUC 510 or EDUC 514

Education Courses: Dual Language/Bilingual Teacher Ed, General Teacher Ed, and Special Ed

These courses run January 16, 2024—April 30, 2024

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
EDUC500-1 Child Development 3 Online Ludmila de Amorim Paquete da Costa TH 4:45-6:45 PM
In this course we will examine the interactions among the cognitive, social, emotional, linguistic, and physical development of children from infancy into adolescence. We will pay close attention to children as makers of meaning in the contexts of their development, including family, school, socioeconomic class, and culture. Through reading classic and current literature, we will attend to some of the larger questions about development, such as the relationship between nature and nurture, the role of developmental theory, and the tension between the search for developmental universals and the reality of individual differences. The goal is to make developmental theory vibrant and meaningful so that the generalized theoretical child comes to enhance and inform how one understands individual children.
This course will meet fully synchronously online.
EDUC505-1 Language Acquisition and Learning in a Linguistically Diverse Society 2 612/613 Tyler Jennings T 7:00-9:00 PM
Based on the belief that language is an essential foundation for learning, this course addresses the typical processes of language acquisition in mono- and multilingual learners. Participants will examine theories of language acquisition and the role that caregivers and educators play in the development of language. In addition, participants will analyze historical, political, educational, social, and emotional factors that influence the socially constructed hierarchies of language varieties. A significant part of the course will be devoted to students who learn English as an additional language. Participants will learn how to use assessment of mono- and multilingual learners to identify appropriate instructional practices for social and academic language use in a range of educational settings. Course participants will also learn about ways of collaborating with families, colleagues, specialists, administrators, and interpreters.
This course will run hybrid. Students will participate onground and the instructor will participate online.
EDUC510-1 Curriculum in Early Childhood Education (Grades N – 3) 3 Abigail Kerlin T 4:45-6:45 PM Cancelled
This course engages participants in understanding curriculum as the development of experiences and environments across the school day that support all domains of children’s development including social, emotional, and cognitive. Participants study how children come to learn about themselves, others, and the world through rich interactions with people, environments, and materials. The course focuses on social studies as the core of the early childhood classroom, using children’s lived experiences within families, neighborhoods, and communities as the central content for exploration. Social studies is a vehicle for a deeper understanding of self and others towards the goal of creating more just and democratic communities. Participants apply their learning as they develop interdisciplinary curriculum grounded in their observations of children’s identities and curiosities as well as their development. Participants consider how to advocate for a progressive approach to curriculum across a range of contexts and with a diverse range of learners.
EDUC513-1 Social Studies Curriculum Development for Inclusive and Special Education Settings (Grades 1 – 6) 3 702 Niles Mattier M 4:45-6:45 PM
This course provides the opportunity for participants to analyze and develop integrated curricula in social studies using a sociopolitical lens. Participants integrate knowledge from the six disciplines of social studies: history, anthropology, sociology, political science, geography, and economics into the design of a constructivist, inquiry-based social studies curriculum. The course explores ways children come to learn and care about themselves and others through social studies. There is an emphasis on differentiating curriculum, including attention to diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds, and variations in development.
EDUC514-1 Curriculum in Early Childhood Education for Inclusive and Special Education Settings 3 612/613 Soyoung Park TH 4:45-6:45 PM
This course provides a framework for developing curriculum that engages all children in authentic meaning making about themselves and their wider world.  Participants use principles of child development and developmental variation as a foundation for planning experiences that support deep learning.  The course focuses on curriculum as the core vehicle for affirming children’s developing identities, including cultural and linguistic identity. Using social studies as the core of an integrated curriculum, participants plan using diverse materials, modalities, content, and perspectives to help children examine big questions. Participants use universal design principles to create learning experiences that are inclusive of a broadly diverse range of learners.
EDUC525-1 Assistive Technology as a Tool for Providing Educational Access 1 Mark Surabian TH 4:45-6:50 PM 2/29, 3/7, 3/14, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18 Cancelled
This course examines how technology can create opportunities for access and expression for learners, including children with variations in learning, sensory, communication, and physical development. Through readings, discussion, and experimenting with a variety of actual technologies, participants will strengthen their capacities to match such tools to learner needs in diverse learning environments and activities. Participants will reflect on classroom experiences to ascertain how accessibility for learners can be enhanced. They will consider broader issues of access and equity, as they deepen their understandings of how technology can assist in creating more inclusive learning environments.
EDUC530-1 Foundations of Modern Education 3 707 Deborah Brooks Lawrence TH 7:00-9:00 PM
This course examines the historical, philosophical, and cultural roots of contemporary education, including Bank Street’s progressive history and philosophy, the contributions of major educational leaders, and current practices and innovations in education. Participants will analyze how critical issues in the field affect their practice with children and families in schools and communities. The course will explore ways in which education as an avenue for individual advancement and social justice has been defined, advocated for, enacted, and is still being negotiated in the U.S. The course will attend to what has been achieved as well as challenges that remain in creating educational spaces that affirm children’s and families’ race, social class, immigration status, language, gender, and ability, among other identity domains. Participants will apply their understandings to think about their role in bringing about desired, warranted changes in order to create more inclusive and democratic educational environments.
EDUC535-1 Science for Teachers (Grades N – 6) 2 408/409 Mona Arriola McNamara T 4:45-6:45 PM
Science for Teachers focuses on developing a science way of thinking and doing in PreK-6th grade classrooms. Each session deepens an understanding that doing science requires direct sensory encounters with the physical world. By experiencing first-hand investigations of physical and biological materials and related phenomena, participants create a range of representations that can uncover existing patterns and concepts. Discussions, readings, and reflective writings deepen and broaden work done with physical materials. Participants will reflect on their own learning as they work to construct meaningful science experiences that respond to the developmental levels of their students and affirm students’ cultural, linguistic, and learning diversity. The course explores evidence-based ways of making sense of the world that support the integration of science inquiry across the curriculum.
EDUC540-1 Mathematics for Teachers in Diverse and Inclusive Educational Settings (Grades N – 6) 2 406 Helen Spruill M 7:00-9:00 PM
This course provides participants with an overview of mathematics learning for children grades N-6. Participants deepen their own mathematical knowledge while furthering their understanding of effective mathematics instruction. In each session, participants do math together and use these experiences to investigate the development of mathematical thinking and to reflect on their own learning. Participants explore the essential elements of a constructivist mathematics classroom in which collaboration is core to building concepts and skills. Designing a classroom where deep mathematical understanding is the primary goal requires explorations of attitudes and beliefs as well as practices and expectations. This course addresses the moral imperative that all students are capable of learning math. It focuses on creating inclusive environments for learners with developmental variations. The course also focuses on creating mathematical experiences that support students for whom English is a new language. Participants discuss classroom management strategies for grouping and individualizing instruction.
EDUC542-1 Assessment and Instruction in Teaching Mathematics to Children with Learning Variations 2 401 Jaime Palmer W 7:00-9:00 PM
This course has been designed to convey the process of clini-cal teaching. Through focus on an individual child, students will be concerned with the practical and theoretical aspects of learning style, language as a learning tool, perceptual abilities and disabilities, dyscalculia, and specific arithmetic disability. Students will learn to analyze children’s strengths and weaknesses and to describe and clearly communicate specific recommendations for the child’s parents and classroom teacher.
EDUC563-1 The Teaching of Reading, Writing, and Language Arts in the Primary Grades 3 706 Mollie Welsh Kruger TH 4:45-6:45 PM
This course examines the process through which reading and writing are acquired by young children, ages 4-8.  We study the ways teachers can support literacy growth for children’s diverse learning needs and styles, cultural and linguistic backgrounds, and socioeconomic status.  The course explores theoretical frameworks of literacy development as well as practical applications. Graduate students work directly with a child, who is an emergent reader and writer, to develop the skills of close observation, assessment, record keeping, and planning.  Graduate students, individually and as a group, analyze the contexts, activities and relationships that support children’s language and literacy learning in early childhood classrooms.
EDUC565-1 Children’s Literature in the Upper Elementary Grades 3 703 Lynne Einbender T 4:45-6:45 PM
This course explores the study of contemporary children’s literature through a range of perspectives informed by literary theory and literary criticism, which provide frameworks for selecting and teaching texts in classrooms.  Through the process of reading multiple books, participants consider the elements of character, plot, setting, point of view and tone in individual texts and across texts to promote the understanding of genre, text structure, theme and cultural perspectives.  Participants discuss ways to organize the study of literature and develop children’s capacities to articulate their personal responses to deepen their comprehension.
EDUC591-1 Music and Movement Workshop for Teachers (Grades PreK-6) 2 703 Laura Montanari T 7:00-9:00 PM
This course explores the importance of children’s expression through music and movement. Everyone has the capacity to produce music and engage in creative movement. Participants at all levels of experience and skill will learn about and share songs, rhythms, and games from a range of cultural and linguistic traditions. In order to develop strategies for integrating music and movement across the curriculum, participants will engage with topics such as instrument-making from recyclable materials, drumming, sound improvisation, and movement as vehicles for expression and learning. As they engage with creating and reflecting on music and movement experiences, participants will explore the role music and movement play in children’s development in classroom environments.
EDUC629-1 Education of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders 1 612/613 Rae Leeper W 7:00-9:00 PM 1/24 - 2/28
This course will explore autism spectrum disorder (ASD) from historical, cultural, political, and developmental lenses. It will support graduate students in thinking deeply and from multiple perspectives about the evolution of our understandings about and interventions with the broad range of characteristics of learning and development attributed to people with ASD. This course considers the significance of home and/or school as the primary sources of educational intervention and direct services for children with ASD. Participants will consider the importance of providing young children with ASD with an educational program that is responsive to each child’s unique pattern of relative strengths and vulnerabilities, and will learn ways to partner in this work with a diverse range of families.  Participants will explore the use of assistive technology as a tool for supporting student learning, communication, and independence.
EDUC801-1 The World of the Infant: The First Year of Life 3 704 Melina Gac Levin T 4:45-6:45 PM
This course is about infants and families within the first year of life. The primary goal of the course is for graduate students to understand infant development across individual differences and contexts. There is a strong emphasis on using theory to facilitate an understanding of development and to articulate a point of view about these extraordinary first months. Participants will bring together research, theory and their own observations of infants to understand the cognitive, perceptual, sensorimotor/movement and social-emotional changes that occur when babies are in interaction with the world. Participants will study the science of brain development and its impact on all developmental domains. The course will attend to the specific contributions of familial and socio-political cultural and linguistic contexts as well as to the contributions of infants themselves. It will also explore the balance between the “expected” global shifts in development and each human being’s profound individual differences. This is not a “how to” course. Rather, the course provides knowledge of the developmental systems of infants who have a range of abilities. This course develops awareness and knowledge of infant mental health in development, dyadic relationships and systems. Graduate students work on articulating their knowledge of development, on learning about new findings in the field, and on communicating with families. Prerequisite: EDUC 500.
Prerequisite for EDUC801: EDUC 500 or EDUC 800
EDUC803-1 Developmental Variations 2 704 Sarah Sloane TH 7:00-9:00 PM
This course is designed to increase participants’ awareness and understanding of the educational, social, cultural, linguistic and developmental implications of disability from historical, legal, and socio-political perspectives. The course will critically examine state and federal special education and disability laws and regulations and their implementation across a range of settings including their intersection with issues of race, class, language and gender. There is an emphasis on understanding how disability is socially constructed at the levels of family, community, school, and the larger society.  Participants apply an understanding of developmental variations to analyze and create accessible learning experiences for children. Prerequisite: EDUC 500 or permission of instructor.
Prerequisite for EDUC803: EDUC 500 or EDUC 501 or EDUC 800 or permission of instructor
EDUC805-1 Developmental Variations II: Emotional and Behavioral Development 2 704 Sean O'Shea TH 4:45-6:45 PM
This course focuses on understanding, teaching, and meeting the needs of children with variations in emotional, social and behavioral development. Participants will critically examine the construct of children’s emotional and behavioral disorders and approaches to intervention from historical, socio-political, mental health, and legal perspectives. There is an emphasis on  understanding the intersection of these issues with the race, class, language, and gender of teachers and children. Participants will develop an in-depth case study of a child applying an inquiry orientation to the Functional Behavior Assessment-Behavior Intervention Plan. Participants will collect and analyze data from observations, interviews and other sources, and make recommendations to support ongoing social and behavioral development. Prerequisite: EDUC 803.
Prerequisites for EDUC805: EDUC 500 or EDUC 501 or EDUC 800; EDUC 803
EDUC808-1 The Study of Children in Diverse & Inclusive Educational Settings through Observation and Recording 3 709 Lori-Ann Mangal M 4:45-6:45 PM
This course focuses on observation as a practice for more deeply understanding children through their interactions with people, experiences, and materials across a range of environments. Through a case study of one child, participants deepen their knowledge, skills, and dispositions for observing children. They learn to translate observations into descriptive, written data and analyze observational data to inform practice. Participants develop skills of reflection and analysis as they investigate how bias and perspective impact observation and one’s understanding of children. Participants integrate knowledge about variations in children’s social-emotional, cognitive, linguistic, motor, and language development. They consider multiple domains of children’s individual and socio-cultural identities including race, gender, culture, and language and the implications for constructing inclusive and culturally sustaining classroom environments and curricula. Prerequisite: EDUC 500 or permission of instructor.
Prerequisite for EDUC 808: EDUC 500 or EDUC 800 or permission of instructor
EDUC808R-1R The Study of Children in Diverse & Inclusive Educational Settings through Observation and Recording 3 Online Lauren Bokaer M 4:45-6:45 PM
This course is running fully online.
Prerequisite for EDUC 808: EDUC 500 or EDUC 800 or permission of instructor
EDUC860-1 Assessment and Instruction in Teaching Literacy to Children with Language and Learning Variations 3 705 Susan Rolander TH 7:00-9:00 PM
This course integrates research, theory, and practice as participants learn about supporting literacy development for children with reading, writing, and language variations. Participants learn about the reading and writing processes within a developmental framework. The course explores the iterative relationship between assessment and intervention, and critically examines a range of methods and materials in use in the field. Participants apply their learning as they work over multiple sessions with a child. Prerequisite: EDUC 563 or EDUC 568.
Prerequisites for EDUC 860: EDUC 505; EDUC 563 or EDUC 568.
EDUC863-1 Collaboration and Differentiation in the Instruction of Children with Learning Variations 3 612/613 ElizabethAnn Duffy TH 7:00-9:00 PM
This course combines theory and practice through work with children from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds who have learning variations. Using assessment data gathered through formal and informal measures, students will devise educational plans for children. Participants will be exposed to a repertoire of evidence-based practices and instructional strategies in oral language, reading, written language, and math in order to promote positive learning outcomes. The course will also provide opportunities to develop and apply strategies for working with families and collaborating with other educators. Utilizing their knowledge of individual learning differences, participants will become skilled at differentiating instruction for a class of students with diverse learning needs. Prerequisite: EDUC 803.
Prerequisites for EDUC 863: EDUC 803; EDUC 563 or EDUC 568 or EDUC 540 or EDUC 542.
EDUC868-1 Approaches to Teaching Decoding to Diverse Learners 2 705 Marylen Townley Massen TH 4:45-6:45 PM
This course explores varied approaches to teaching decoding and word study to children who have learning variations with reading and spelling. Participants examine the theory and research that inform our current understandings of the reading process and explore how these understandings have changed over time. Participants study language processes and apply this linguistic knowledge when assessing children’s reading strengths and challenges. The course examines how the use of language systems varies for readers across different languages to better understand how language-based disabilities differ from the developmental patterns of learning a new language. Participants learn about varied assessment tools, methods, and intervention programs used in supporting children’s decoding. They apply this learning as they develop differentiated decoding instruction for a diverse population of learners, including those who are learning English and those who have developmental variations.  Prerequisite: EDUC 860.
Prerequisite for EDUC868: EDUC 860
EDUC891-1 Practicum in Developmental Assessment of Infants and Toddlers 3 701 Marjorie Brickley M 4:45-6:45 PM
The Practicum in Developmental Assessment of Infants and Toddlers prepares graduate students to assess very young children across a wide developmental range, including those with developmental variations, and to support families through the assessment process. Taking a relationship-based developmental approach to the observation and assessment of infant/toddler behavior, graduate students will use the assessment process to provide a close look at development across all developmental domains. Participants will learn to use assessments to create an IFSP for Early Intervention in collaboration with the family. Graduate students will learn how to administer and evaluate the validity and usefulness of several different assessment and screening tools such as the Bayley Scales of Infant Development III and other standardized, criterion-referenced and evidence-based tools. Participants will be trained in a collaborative approach with families, respecting the family’s perspective while focusing on the strengths of and challenges to each child’s development. Participants come to understand the young child within the sociocultural context of his/her family. Families from a diverse range of cultural and ethnic backgrounds participate in the course. The course requires graduate students to make a play-based developmental assessment, including observations of a child and dialogue with the child’s parents in the family’s home. Graduate students are required to meet with their family to discuss the overall assessment process. Prerequisites: EDUC 801 and EDUC 802.
Prerequisite for EDUC891: EDUC 801 and EDUC 802
EDUC893-1 Approaches to Early Childhood Assessment 2 705 Ross Harold M 4:45-6:45 PM
This course introduces and explores informal and formal assessment practices for young children. Students will learn about various ways of observing, collecting, documenting, and analyzing children’s work and learning experiences in a variety of settings. Students will also become familiar with formal and informal assessment procedures and terminology, standardized testing, and strategies for test selection, to ensure results that are valid and unbiased. Students will also examine legal, ethical, culturally responsive, and professional considerations of assessment. Students will be given practical experience in the preparation and administration of different forms of assessment, including the construction of simple performance assessments. Critical attention will be given to careful interpretation and utilization of assessment data in developing meaningful curriculum and educational plans for individual children. Culturally responsive approaches to assessment and involving the family with the assessment process will also be addressed. Prerequisite: EDUC 803 or EDUC 894.

Prerequisite for EDUC 893: EDUC 803 or EDUC 894

The previous title for EDUC 893 was "Developmental Systems II: Approaches to Early Childhood Assessment"

EDUC895-1 Early Childhood Practicum II: Collaborating w Families and Colleagues in Assess, Plan, and Instr 2 612/613 Elizabeth Silva M 7:00-9:00 PM
This course completes a year-long sequence of work with a child and the child’s family. The focus in the second semester is two-fold: 1) developing a responsive collaboration with the family and 2) developing and analyzing the use of a range of instructional strategies. Through conversations, participants learn about the family’s perspectives and goals. To gather further data, participants select, develop, and use a variety of informal assessments. Participants apply their developing knowledge of the child’s interests and developmental needs as they design and implement instructional strategies. The course engages participants in a deep understanding of the assessment, planning and instruction cycle as they collect data and reflect on their instruction and apply their learnings in their ongoing work with the child and family.  Participants will work with families to jointly plan goals as they develop their understandings of the IEP/IFSP. Prerequisite: EDUC 894.
Prerequisite for EDUC895: EDUC 894
EDUC994R-1R Extended Field Experiences 1 Online Staff TBD MTh 4:45-6:45 PM 3/18, 3/21
This one-credit course provides working teachers, interns, and assistant teachers the opportunity to meet the mandated New York State regulations for certification. The State regulations require teacher candidates to work in an additional grade band level in a high needs public setting, according to the age band of their certification. In addition, there may be an expectation of direct work with English language learners (ELLs) and/or students with IEPs. Graduate students will be placed in appropriate educational programs for at least 50 hours. In addition, graduate students will participate in a series of seminars focused on these classroom experiences. (Online version)

This fieldwork experience requires the following components:

  • For onground students – Wednesday, February 7th 6:15-6:45 PM in room 403 - (end of conference group)
  • For online students – Wednesday, February 7th 7:00-7:30 PM on Zoom - (beginning of conference group)
  • Goal-Setting 1-on-1 Meeting with Instructor March 4th-15th (30 minutes)
  • Placement Dates March 18th-28th (50 hours)
  • Synchronous Meeting with Instructor and Peers Monday, March 18th 4:45-6:45 PM
  • Synchronous Meeting with Instructor and Peers Thursday, March 21st 4:45-6:45 PM
  • Reflection 1-on-1 Meeting with Instructor April 1st-5th (45 minutes)

This course will meet fully synchronously online.

LEAD561-1 Supervising and Supporting Literacy Instruction in Diverse Settings 1 706 Mollie Welsh Kruger W 7:00-9:00 PM 1/17, 1/31, 2/14, 2/28, 3/13, 3/27
This course prepares participants to work with student leaders, new teachers, and colleagues as they plan effective literacy practices. Using a peer coaching/mentor model, participants work with a teacher who would like to learn or refine a literacy practice. Through observation, modeling, coteaching, and preparatory and debriefing conversations, participants observe, record, and analyze the content and processes involved in coaching interactions. These experiences will allow participants to work more effectively with colleagues through regular conversations, discussions, and consultations about learners, literacy theory and practice, assessment, and instruction.

Fieldwork/Student Teaching/Advisement Courses

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
EDUC931-1 Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 6 Staff TBD W 4:45-6:45 PM
Fieldwork in appropriate settings with supervision and advisement. Candidates in advisement participate in weekly small-group conferences with their advisor. These seminars include the exchange and analysis of ongoing professional experiences and provide a forum for integrating theory with practice. Participants will develop their capacity to construct learning environments and communities that support the development of infants, children, and/or adolescents, depending on the focus of their program. Opportunities to collaborate and co-teach with cooperating teachers and other setting personnel are an integral part of the course. This course is the second half of EDUC930.
This course is the second half of EDUC930.
EDUC931R-1R Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 6 Online Staff TBD W 7:00-9:00 PM
Fieldwork in appropriate settings with supervision and advisement. Candidates in advisement participate in weekly small-group conferences with their advisor. These seminars include the exchange and analysis of ongoing professional experiences and provide a forum for integrating theory with practice. Participants will develop their capacity to construct learning environments and communities that support the development of infants, children, and/or adolescents, depending on the focus of their program. Opportunities to collaborate and co-teach with cooperating teachers and other setting personnel are an integral part of the course. This course is is the second half of EDUC930R.
This course is the second half of EDUC930R. This course is for students in the online early childhood and childhood programs only.
EDUC934-1 Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 3 Staff TBD W 4:45-6:45 PM
Fieldwork in appropriate settings with supervision and advisement. Candidates in advisement participate in small-group conferences with their advisor. These seminars include the exchange and analysis of ongoing professional experiences and provide a forum for integrating theory with practice. Participants will develop their capacity to construct learning environments and communities that support the development of infants, children, and/or adolescents, depending on the focus of their program. Opportunities to collaborate and co-teach with cooperating teachers and other school personnel are an integral part of the course. This course is the second half of EDUC932.
This course is the second half of EDUC932.
EDUC937-1 Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 6 Staff TBD W 4:45-6:45 PM
Fieldwork in appropriate settings with supervision and advisement. Candidates in advisement participate in weekly small-group conferences with their advisor. These seminars include the exchange and analysis of ongoing professional experiences and provide a forum for integrating theory with practice. Participants will develop their capacity to construct learning environments and communities that support the development of infants, children, and/or adolescents, depending on the focus of their program. Opportunities to collaborate and co-teach with cooperating teachers and other setting personnel are an integral part of the course. This course is for one semester only.
EDUC937R-1R Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 6 Online Staff TBD W 4:45-6:45 PM
Fieldwork in appropriate settings with supervision and advisement. Candidates in advisement participate in weekly small-group conferences with their advisor. These seminars include the exchange and analysis of ongoing professional experiences and provide a forum for integrating theory with practice. Participants will develop their capacity to construct learning environments and communities that support the development of infants, children, and/or adolescents, depending on the focus of their program. Opportunities to collaborate and co-teach with cooperating teachers and other setting personnel are an integral part of the course. This course is for one semester only.
This course is for students in the online early childhood and childhood programs only.
EDUC944-1 Teaching Literacy Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 6 Staff TBD W 4:45-6:45 PM
Fieldwork in an appropriate setting with supervision and advisement. Students in advisement participate in weekly small-group conferences with their advisor. These seminars include the exchange and analysis of ongoing professional experiences and provide a forum for integrating theory and practice. Attention is given to instructional strategies for addressing the individual academic and behavioral needs of typically and atypically developing children within classroom settings. Opportunities to collaborate and coteach with cooperating teachers and other school personnel are an integral part of the course. This course is the second half of EDUC943. Pre- or co-requisite: EDUC 860, EDUC943
This course is the second half of EDUC943.

Integrative Master's Project - Independent Study Option

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
IS500-1 Independent Study 0 Staff TBD See mentor
The Independent Study is an original work that you initiate, often growing out of a meaningful course assignment or an idea, question, or experience rooted in a fieldwork or work setting. Students work with a faculty mentor who has expertise in the particular area of study. The Independent Study usually includes two semesters of research and writing, and is most closely aligned with a traditional master’s thesis. Independent Studies are made accessible to the public though the Bank Street Library's online catalogue.

IMPORTANT NOTE TO STUDENTS REGISTERING FOR INDEPENDENT STUDIES In order to register for Independent Studies (IS500) you must have already secured a faculty mentor who has reviewed your IS proposal and has committed to serve as your IS mentor. By registering for the IS500, you are attesting to having secured a mentor, and you are agreeing to follow all applicable IS directives and guidelines as stated in A Guide to the Integrative Master’s Project.

In addition to registering through myBSC for IS500, please fill out the Independent Study Mentor Form, located on the website schedule (https://graduate.bankstreet.edu/academics/graduate-course-schedule/) indicating which faculty member has consented to mentor you.

Students should register only at the beginning of their Independent Study. Students continuing an Independent Study from a previous semester should contact their Student Services Advisor before registering.

Registration is not allowed after January 19, 2023.

IMPORTANT NOTE TO STUDENTS REGISTERING FOR INDEPENDENT STUDIES: In order to register for an Independent Study (IS500) you must have already secured a faculty mentor who has reviewed your proposal and has committed to serving as your mentor. By registering for IS500, you are attesting to having secured a mentor, and you are agreeing to follow all applicable Independent Study directives and guidelines as stated in A Guide to the Integrative Master’s Project.

In addition to registering through my.BSC for IS500, please fill out the Independent Study Mentor Form, indicating which faculty member has consented to mentor you.

Please note: Students who register without completing the above form will be dropped from their Independent Study. You must identify your mentor in order to be enrolled in an Independent Study for the term.

IS500R-1R Independent Study 0 Online Staff TBD See mentor
The Independent Study is an original work that you initiate, often growing out of a meaningful course assignment or an idea, question, or experience rooted in a fieldwork or work setting. Students work with a faculty mentor who has expertise in the particular area of study. The Independent Study usually includes two semesters of research and writing, and is most closely aligned with a traditional master’s thesis. Independent Studies are made accessible to the public though the Bank Street Library's online catalogue.

Students should register only at the beginning of their Independent Study. Students continuing an Independent Study from a previous semester should contact their Student Services Advisor before registering.

Registration is not allowed after January 19, 2023.

IMPORTANT NOTE TO STUDENTS REGISTERING FOR INDEPENDENT STUDIES: In order to register for an Independent Study (IS500R) you must have already secured a faculty mentor who has reviewed your proposal and has committed to serving as your mentor. By registering for IS500R, you are attesting to having secured a mentor, and you are agreeing to follow all applicable Independent Study directives and guidelines as stated in A Guide to the Integrative Master’s Project.

In addition to registering through my.BSC for IS500R, please fill out the Independent Study Mentor Form, indicating which faculty member has consented to mentor you.

Please note: Students who register without completing the above form will be dropped from their Independent Study. You must identify your mentor in order to be enrolled in an Independent Study for the term.

Integrative Master's Project - Semester-Based IMP Options

Note: These are a Semester-Based IMP Options. Student work must be completed and submitted by the end of one semester. Students who do not complete their work by the end of the semester will be required to re-register and pay for another IMP option in the future. Please read the dates in the schedule carefully, and be sure to register on time and attend all sessions.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
IMP2-1A Collaborative Student Faculty Inquiry 0 Kim McLeveighn-Helper, Mollie Welsh Kruger T 4:45-6:45 PM 1/23, 2/27, 3/26, 4/23
The Collaborative Student-Faculty Inquiry is a one-semester small peer group option focused on a specific topic or issue. These topics, based on professional interests faculty would like to explore along with students, are posted each fall and spring. You identify a particular aspect of the topic or issue to investigate and, with your peers, determine a format in which to coordinate and present the findings. Students present their projects in mid-January or the week of graduation in May.

Title: Three Chords & Shekeres for Your Classroom

Music enhances math minds and builds language skills for reading too. Come learn some basic instrument skills on guitar, ukulele, or shekere that could invite your students more deeply into learning. This IMP option has choices of instrument as well individual direction for the academic exploration of music for the age of your students. You can create your own project focused on music in the classroom. The final project is an academic paper with curricular intentions embedded - plus you will be ready to play for your students.

Students must either own, borrow, or buy a guitar, ukulele, or shekere to participate in this IMP.

Contact the facilitator/instructor if there are questions about a specific inquiry. Registration is not allowed after the class has met.

This section will run onground and in conjunction with IMP2-1B.

IMP2-1B Collaborative Student Faculty Inquiry 0 Kim McLeveighn-Helper, Mollie Welsh Kruger T 4:45-6:45 PM 1/23, 2/27, 3/26, 4/23
The Collaborative Student-Faculty Inquiry is a one-semester small peer group option focused on a specific topic or issue. These topics, based on professional interests faculty would like to explore along with students, are posted each fall and spring. You identify a particular aspect of the topic or issue to investigate and, with your peers, determine a format in which to coordinate and present the findings. Students present their projects in mid-January or the week of graduation in May.

Title: Three Chords & Shekeres for Your Classroom

Music enhances math minds and builds language skills for reading too. Come learn some basic instrument skills on guitar, ukulele, or shekere that could invite your students more deeply into learning. This IMP option has choices of instrument as well individual direction for the academic exploration of music for the age of your students. You can create your own project focused on music in the classroom. The final project is an academic paper with curricular intentions embedded - plus you will be ready to play for your students.

Students must either own, borrow, or buy a guitar, ukulele, or shekere to participate in this IMP.

Contact the facilitator/instructor if there are questions about a specific inquiry. Registration is not allowed after the class has met.

This section will run onground and in conjunction with IMP2-1A.

IMP2-2 Collaborative Student Faculty Inquiry 0 Online Mark Nagasawa W 7:00-9:00 PM 1/17, 2/21, 3/27, 4/17
The Collaborative Student-Faculty Inquiry is a one-semester small peer group option focused on a specific topic or issue. These topics, based on professional interests faculty would like to explore along with students, are posted each fall and spring. You identify a particular aspect of the topic or issue to investigate and, with your peers, determine a format in which to coordinate and present the findings. Students present their projects in mid-January or the week of graduation in May.

Title: “Parents are a Child's First Teacher”: Exploring the Complexities of Family Partnerships

Early childhood educators are fond of saying, “parents are a child’s first teacher”; however, the realities of partnering with children’s parents and caregivers are far more complicated. This collaborative inquiry will explore the practice of “family and community partnerships” through the dual lenses of the developmental interaction approach and intersectionality. Therefore, we will help each other reflect on the interactions of racism, classism, sexism, ableism, linguicism, etc. in our relationships with children’s families. This will be a catalyst for students’ IMPs, which can take many forms, such as critical personal narratives, case studies, curricular recommendations to the college, or other ideas that emerge from the collective process.

Contact the facilitator/instructor if there are questions about a specific inquiry. Registration is not allowed after the class has met.

This section will run hybrid. Students can attend on-campus or online.

IMP2-3 Collaborative Student Faculty Inquiry 0 Online Katie Caster M 4:45-6:45 PM 1/23, 2/25, 3/25, 4/22
The Collaborative Student-Faculty Inquiry is a one-semester small peer group option focused on a specific topic or issue. These topics, based on professional interests faculty would like to explore along with students, are posted each fall and spring. You identify a particular aspect of the topic or issue to investigate and, with your peers, determine a format in which to coordinate and present the findings. Students present their projects in mid-January or the week of graduation in May.

Title: Juntos: Engaging Spanish Speaking Families

This IMP will focus on how teachers can engage Spanish-speaking families in and out of the classroom. We will explore the Dual Capacity Model of family engagement and work on an action plan to increase family involvement with a special emphasis on cultural competence and utilizing our communities' funds of knowledge.

Contact the facilitator/instructor if there are questions about a specific inquiry. Registration is not allowed after the class has met.

This section will run hybrid. Students can attend on-campus or online.

IMP2D-1D Collaborative Student Faculty Inquiry: Child Life 0 Online Genevieve Lowry TH 7:00-9:00 PM 1/18, 2/15, 3/14, 4/18
The Collaborative Student-Faculty Inquiry is a one-semester small peer group option for Child Life students, focused on a specific topic or issue. These topics, based on professional interests faculty would like to explore along with students, are posted each fall and spring. You identify a particular aspect of the topic or issue to investigate and, with your peers, determine a format in which to coordinate and present the findings. Students present their projects in mid-January or the week of graduation in May.

Title: Using Loose Parts in Child Life Practice

Child Life students are invited to continue their exploration and refinement of their medical preparation and teaching skills through the use of loose parts and a child-centered approach. In partnership with one another and their faculty mentor, students will choose a body part or system, a disease/disorder that might affect it, and how medical treatment will occur and affect the body. The inquiry will culminate in a 3-D loose parts representation of all three of these aspects, a written rationale and reflection, and a live presentation of the project to the inquiry group and larger Bank Street audience.

Contact the facilitator/instructor if there are questions about a specific inquiry. Registration is not allowed after the class has met.

This section will run online.

IMP2R-1R Collaborative Student Faculty Inquiry 0 Online Valentine Burr, Jessica Charles M 7:00-9:00 PM 1/22, 2/26, 3/25, 4/8
The Collaborative Student-Faculty Inquiry is a one-semester small peer group option focused on a specific topic or issue. These topics, based on professional interests faculty would like to explore along with students, are posted each fall and spring. You identify a particular aspect of the topic or issue to investigate and, with your peers, determine a format in which to coordinate and present the findings. Students present their projects in mid-January or the week of graduation in May.

Title: Teaching Citizen Science

In this group, you will explore the Cornell Citizen Science bird tracking curriculum, and work on developing a plan for implementing a citizen science project in your classroom.

Contact the facilitator/instructor if there are questions about a specific inquiry. Registration is not allowed after the class has met.

This section will run online.

IMP2R-2R Collaborative Student Faculty Inquiry 0 Online Mollie Welsh Kruger TH 7:00-9:00 PM 1/25, 2/29, 3/28, 4/25
The Collaborative Student-Faculty Inquiry is a one-semester small peer group option focused on a specific topic or issue. These topics, based on professional interests faculty would like to explore along with students, are posted each fall and spring. You identify a particular aspect of the topic or issue to investigate and, with your peers, determine a format in which to coordinate and present the findings. Students present their projects in mid-January or the week of graduation in May.

Title: Picture Books for The Ages

This IMP option invites writers to create a picture book for children of a specific age group of the writer's choice. In addition to the picture book, participants will write a rationale and a child development section, review other children's literature for the same age-level, share their picture book with a group of children, and write a reflective conclusion. The final picture book must include some form of visual illustration.

Contact the facilitator/instructor if there are questions about a specific inquiry. Registration is not allowed after the class has met.

This section will run online.

IMP2R-3R Collaborative Student Faculty Inquiry 0 Online Gil Schmerler M 7:00-9:00 PM 1/22, 2/26, 3/25, 4/22
The Collaborative Student-Faculty Inquiry is a one-semester small peer group option focused on a specific topic or issue. These topics, based on professional interests faculty would like to explore along with students, are posted each fall and spring. You identify a particular aspect of the topic or issue to investigate and, with your peers, determine a format in which to coordinate and present the findings. Students present their projects in mid-January or the week of graduation in May.

Title: Teacher Leadership

Bank Street-educated teachers are invariably called on for leadership in their schools, yet their preparation programs do not often have room for learning to promote collaboration, peer coaching, and advocacy. This collaborative inquiry provides the opportunity for students to investigate and practice the skills to become teacher leaders and, in general, to inspire, support, and coach their colleagues in improving instructional practice and creating stronger cultures in their workplaces. Participants typically create case studies and/or descriptive analyses of teacher leadership in their own school sites (or, alternatively, a school to which they have ready access).

Contact the facilitator/instructor if there are questions about a specific inquiry. Registration is not allowed after the class has met.

This section will run online.

IMP2R-4R Collaborative Student Faculty Inquiry 0 Online Margaret Blachly T 4:45-6:45 PM 1/23, 2/13, 3/12, 4/16
The Collaborative Student-Faculty Inquiry is a one-semester small peer group option focused on a specific topic or issue. These topics, based on professional interests faculty would like to explore along with students, are posted each fall and spring. You identify a particular aspect of the topic or issue to investigate and, with your peers, determine a format in which to coordinate and present the findings. Students present their projects in mid-January or the week of graduation in May.

Title: Using Emotionally Responsive Practice (ERP) in the Classroom Setting

This IMP offers a unique opportunity to develop your understanding of the concepts and techniques that are the foundation of Emotionally Responsive Practice, as developed by Lesley Koplow, LCSW. The IMP is also practice-based, meaning that you will bring these concepts and techniques into your professional setting. If you are not currently working with children, please reach out to the mentor to discuss whether the IMP can be adapted to your circumstance.

Contact the facilitator/instructor if there are questions about a specific inquiry. Registration is not allowed after the class has met.

This section will run online.

IMP2R-5R Collaborative Student Faculty Inquiry 0 Online Tyler Jennings TH 7:00-9:00 PM 1/25, 2/29, 3/28, 4/5
The Collaborative Student-Faculty Inquiry is a one-semester small peer group option focused on a specific topic or issue. These topics, based on professional interests faculty would like to explore along with students, are posted each fall and spring. You identify a particular aspect of the topic or issue to investigate and, with your peers, determine a format in which to coordinate and present the findings. Students present their projects in mid-January or the week of graduation in May.

Title: Gender and Sexualities in Education

In this IMP, we will focus on three inter-related aspects of gender and sexualities in the context of education.

  1. In alignment with childhood and adolescent development, what might be important and relevant for students to understand about gender and sexualities through the developmental stages of K-8 education?
  2. In what ways could students engage in critical gender studies and critical sexualities studies through these developmental stages? That is, in what ways could they examine gender and sexualities within larger societal contexts and in relation to issues of (in)justice and (in)equity?
  3. What is the history of gender education and sexualities education in the US context, and what implications might our explorations of questions #1 and #2 have upon the future of gender and sexualities education?.

Contact the facilitator/instructor if there are questions about a specific inquiry. Registration is not allowed after the class has met.

This section will run online.

IMP3-1 Mentored Directed Essay 0 Staff TBD See mentor
Students choosing to do a Mentored Directed Essay work with an assigned faculty mentor to design an essay that is based on existing, program-specific prepared questions. These questions are designed to help you think and write about the salient issues pertaining to your chosen area of study. Working with your mentor, you may adapt questions to support the distinctive needs of your professional growth, interests, and current work situation. This option is designed to provide structure and focus with maximum flexibility, and is intended to be completed within a single semester. This option is offered all semesters.

Students should register for section 01. In January, students will be assigned their particular mentor. Registration is not allowed after January 29, 2023, and it is recommended that students register as early as possible, to allow themselves the maximum amount of time to work on their essay questions. Students who register on January 29 will still be required to turn in their completed essay questions to their mentor by the last day of the term.

Students completing a Mentored Directed Essay (MDE) should find the essay for their program and become familiar with the project before meeting with their mentors. To access the MDE, log into myBSC and go to Resources > Integrative Master's Project (IMP).

IMP3R-1R Mentored Directed Essay 0 Online Staff TBD See mentor
Students choosing to do a Mentored Directed Essay work with an assigned faculty mentor to design an essay that is based on existing, program-specific prepared questions. These questions are designed to help you think and write about the salient issues pertaining to your chosen area of study. Working with your mentor, you may adapt questions to support the distinctive needs of your professional growth, interests, and current work situation. This option is designed to provide structure and focus with maximum flexibility, and is intended to be completed within a single semester. This option is offered all semesters.

Students should register for section 01. In January, students will be assigned their particular mentor. Registration is not allowed after January 29, 2023, and it is recommended that students register as early as possible, to allow themselves the maximum amount of time to work on their essay questions. Students who register on January 29 will still be required to turn in their completed essay questions to their mentor by the last day of the term.

Students completing a Mentored Directed Essay (MDE) should find the essay for their program and become familiar with the project before meeting with their mentors. To access the MDE, log into myBSC and go to Resources > Integrative Master's Project (IMP).

Kerlin STEM Institute

For Kerlin STEM Institute Fellows only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
EDUC850-1 Introduction to Teaching STEM in the Early Childhood Classroom 1 Offsite Robert Wallace TH 4:00-5:30 PM 1/20, 1/25,2/1, 2/8, 2/15
This Kerlin STEM Institute course is the first of three practicum courses in teaching STEM content and processes. This course will introduce Bank Street’s Science Way of Thinking and NYSCI’s Design Make Play models of teaching. These approaches encourage learners to construct meaning through active investigations. Participants will develop an understanding of STEM thinking and the multiple ways learners from diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds, and with developmental variations, engage in STEM learning. Participants will use observations and instructional conversations with colleagues to study the ways they and their students come to experience and learn STEM concepts. Finally, participants will investigate their own curriculum, identifying examples where they are already developing students’ STEM thinking and opportunities to build on these experiences. Prerequisite: NSCI 500. For Kerlin STEM Institute fellows only.
For Kerlin STEM Institute Fellows only. This course will meet in person at the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI), 47-01 11th St. Corona, NY 11368, on Saturday, January 20 from 10:00 AM-4:30 PM. All other sessions will be online on the dates and times listed.
Note: For Kerlin STEM Institute Fellows only. This course will be taught at New York Hall of Science (NYSCI), 47-01 11th St. Corona, NY 11368
EDUC851-1 Developing STEM Investigations in the Early Childhood Classroom 1 Offsite Robert Wallace TH 4:00-6:30 PM 3/9, 3/14, 3/21, 3/28, 4/4
In this second course in the Kerlin STEM Institute, participants will: develop ideas and materials for STEM investigations with students that involve construction and engineering; expand their skills for selecting open-ended materials that support STEM inquiry; engage in museum explorations that can be directly applied to their classroom curriculum; and refine skills in using classroom observations and students’ work samples to assess students’ learning. Finally, participants will design linked STEM investigations that support a broad range of learners and encourage students to construct meaning through active investigations in the classroom and on field trips. Prerequisite: EDUC 850. For Kerlin STEM Institute fellows only.
For Kerlin STEM Institute Fellows only. This course will meet in person at the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI), 47-01 11th St. Corona, NY 11368, on Saturday, March 9 from 10-4:30 PM. All other sessions will be online on the dates and times listed.
Note: For Kerlin STEM Institute Fellows only. This course will be taught at New York Hall of Science (NYSCI), 47-01 11th St. Corona, NY 11368.

Child Life

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
EDUC500D-1D Child Development 3 Online Jennifer Costa TH 7:00-9:00 PM
In this course we will examine the interactions among the cognitive, social, emotional, linguistic, and physical development of children from infancy into adolescence. We will pay close attention to children as makers of meaning in the contexts of their development, including family, school, socioeconomic class, and culture. Through reading classic and current literature, we will attend to some of the larger questions about development, such as the relationship between nature and nurture, the role of developmental theory, and the tension between the search for developmental universals and the reality of individual differences. The goal is to make developmental theory vibrant and meaningful so that the generalized theoretical child comes to enhance and inform how one understands individual children.
Note: This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously online. You must be available for synchronous sessions on Thursdays 7:00-9:00 PM throughout the semester. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session. This course is for students in the Child Life Program only. Permission of the Director is needed for all other students.
EDUC503-1D Development: Adolescence through Emerging Adulthood 3 Online Troy Pinkney TH 7:00-9:00 PM
This course continues from EDUC 500: Child Development, focusing on development from adolescence through emerging adulthood. The interactions between physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development will be an organizing focus in the course. Participants will critically analyze different developmental theories about their own experiences, and the experiences of adolescents and young adults and their families, in a range of settings. Through reading classic and current literature, participants will attend to some of the larger questions about development, such as the role and impact of brain development, as well as the tension between the search for developmental universals and the reality of individual differences. The course will pay close attention to adolescents’ emerging identities as mediated by factors including family, peer group, socioeconomic class, gender identity, power, religion, race, language, culture and health, as participants learn to support adolescents and young adults in health care and community environments to develop agency and a positive sense of self. Prerequisite: EDUC 500.
Note: This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously online. You must be available for synchronous sessions on Thursdays 7-9 PM throughout the semester. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session. This course is for students in the Child Life Program only. Permission of the Director is needed for all other students.
EDUC825-1D The Role of Child Life Beyond the Hospital: A Local, National, and Global View 3 Online Genevieve Lowry M 7:00-9:00 PM
This course will examine the role of child life in hospital settings and beyond at the local, national, and global levels. Participants will discuss the impact of challenging life events such as divorce, incarceration, school shootings, and natural disasters on the lives of children and families.  In small group discussions, both asynchronous and synchronous, participants will apply knowledge of child development and the application of child life skills in developing play opportunities, developmental explanations, coping strategies and expressive arts as tools for supporting the psychosocial needs of children and families. Participants will enroll in this course in the fall or spring semester directly before or after taking supervised fieldwork.
Note: This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously online. You must be available for synchronous sessions on Mondays 7:00-9:00 PM throughout the semester. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session. This course is for students in the Child Life Program only. Permission of the Director is needed for all other students.
EDUC828-1D Loss in Children’s Lives: Implications for Schools, Hospitals, and Home 3 Online Deborah Vilas T 7:00-9:00 PM
A developmental perspective is utilized to examine the child’s perception and understanding of levels of loss outside the walls of a healthcare setting. Topics to be addressed include separation and divorce, adoption, foster care, hospital-ization and/or death of a parent, and domestic and media-induced violence. The essential roles of the child life specialist, healthcare provider, and family members will be discussed, underscoring the transdisciplinary collaboration which must exist between these caregivers. Prerequisite: EDUC 500.
Note: This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously online. You must be available for synchronous sessions on Tuesdays 7:00-9:00 PM throughout the semester. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session. This course is for students in the Child Life Program only. Permission of the Director is needed for all other students.
Prerequisite for EDUC828: EDUC 500
EDUC829-1D Therapeutic Play Techniques for Child Life Specialists 3 Online Deborah Vilas M 7:00-9:00 PM
Students will explore the meanings and purposes of play and how play develops as a child develops. Various theories of play therapy will be introduced and the roles of child life specialist and play therapist will be delineated. Students will learn how child life specialists can create the optimal environment to encourage learning, development, and healing through play in hospitals and other healthcare settings. The course also covers directive and nondirective therapeutic play techniques for use in playrooms, clinical settings, and at the bedside, both with the individual child and with groups. Prerequisite: EDUC 500.
Note: This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously online. You must be available for synchronous sessions on Mondays 7:00-9:00 PM throughout the semester. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session. This course is for students in the Child Life Program only. Permission of the Director is needed for all other students.
Prerequisite for EDUC 829: EDUC 500
EDUC950-1D Clinical Experiences and Supervised Fieldwork: Children in Healthcare Settings 6 Online Staff TBD W 7:00-9:00 PM
Fieldwork in an approved child life internship with supervision and advisement. Graduate students participate in weekly small-group conferences with their advisor. These seminars include the exchange and analysis of ongoing professional experiences and provide a forum for integrating theory and practice. Attention is given to developing child life practice that supports the psychosocial and emotional needs of children, adolescents, and families. Graduate students examine and practice strategies for supporting the individual strengths and challenges of a broad range of children and adolescents within medical settings. Opportunities to collaborate with interdisciplinary members of the healthcare team are an integral part of the experience. Graduate students are responsible for securing their own hospital internships.
Note: This will be fully online. All sessions are synchronous.
IMP2D-1D Collaborative Student Faculty Inquiry: Child Life 0 Online Genevieve Lowry TH 7:00-9:00 PM 1/18, 2/15, 3/14, 4/18
The Collaborative Student-Faculty Inquiry is a one-semester small peer group option for Child Life students, focused on a specific topic or issue. These topics, based on professional interests faculty would like to explore along with students, are posted each fall and spring. You identify a particular aspect of the topic or issue to investigate and, with your peers, determine a format in which to coordinate and present the findings. Students present their projects in mid-January or the week of graduation in May.

Title: Using Loose Parts in Child Life Practice

Child Life students are invited to continue their exploration and refinement of their medical preparation and teaching skills through the use of loose parts and a child-centered approach. In partnership with one another and their faculty mentor, students will choose a body part or system, a disease/disorder that might affect it, and how medical treatment will occur and affect the body. The inquiry will culminate in a 3-D loose parts representation of all three of these aspects, a written rationale and reflection, and a live presentation of the project to the inquiry group and larger Bank Street audience.

Contact the facilitator/instructor if there are questions about a specific inquiry. Registration is not allowed after the class has met.

This section will run online.

LEAD825-1D Child Life Program Development and Administration 3 Online Troy Pinkney T 7:00-9:00 PM
This course will introduce students to the skills needed to develop, direct, and manage child life programs in healthcare settings. Emphasis will be placed on developing a philosophy of leadership that fosters team collaboration and staff participation. Program planning will be addressed within the context of child development and child life principles. Topics covered will include staff development and supervision, continuous quality improvement, proposal writing, program development, and departmental management skills. Prerequisite: EDUC 500.
Note: This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously online. You must be available for synchronous sessions on Tuesdays 7:00-9:00 PM throughout the semester. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session. This course is for students in the Child Life Program only. Permission of the Director is needed for all other students.

Childhood General and Special Education Online Program

These courses are only for students enrolled in a fully online degree program.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
EDUC513R-1R Social Studies Curriculum Development for Inclusive and Special Education Settings (Grades 1 – 6) 3 Online Ellen Ferrin T 7:00-9:00 PM
This course provides the opportunity for participants to analyze and develop integrated curricula in social studies using a sociopolitical lens. Participants integrate knowledge from the six disciplines of social studies: history, anthropology, sociology, political science, geography and economics into the design of a constructivist, inquiry-based social studies curriculum. The course explores ways children come to learn and care about themselves and others through the social studies. There is an emphasis on differentiating curriculum, including attention to diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds, and variations in development.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online childhood programs only. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each Tuesday, 7:00-9:00 PM throughout the semester. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC530R-1R Foundations of Modern Education 3 Online Martha Andrews TH 7:00-9:00 PM
This course examines the historical, philosophical, and cultural roots of contemporary education, including Bank Street’s progressive history and philosophy, the contributions of major educational leaders, and current practices and innovations in education. Participants will analyze how critical issues in the field affect their practice with children and families in schools and communities. The course will explore ways in which education as an avenue for individual advancement and social justice has been defined, advocated for, enacted, and is still being negotiated in the U.S. The course will attend to what has been achieved as well as challenges that remain in creating educational spaces that affirm children’s and families’ race, social class, immigration status, language, gender, and ability, among other identity domains. Participants will apply their understandings to think about their role in bringing about desired, warranted changes in order to create more inclusive and democratic educational environments.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online early childhood and childhood programs only. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each Thursday, 7:00-9:00 PM throughout the semester. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC530R-2R Foundations of Modern Education 3 Online Pamela Jones TH 7:00-9:00 PM
This course examines the historical, philosophical, and cultural roots of contemporary education, including Bank Street’s progressive history and philosophy, the contributions of major educational leaders, and current practices and innovations in education. Participants will analyze how critical issues in the field affect their practice with children and families in schools and communities. The course will explore ways in which education as an avenue for individual advancement and social justice has been defined, advocated for, enacted, and is still being negotiated in the U.S. The course will attend to what has been achieved as well as challenges that remain in creating educational spaces that affirm children’s and families’ race, social class, immigration status, language, gender, and ability, among other identity domains. Participants will apply their understandings to think about their role in bringing about desired, warranted changes in order to create more inclusive and democratic educational environments.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online early childhood and childhood programs only. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each Thursday, 7:00-9:00 PM throughout the semester. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC563R-1R The Teaching of Reading, Writing, and Language Arts in the Primary Grades 3 Online Xiania Foster T 7:00-9:00 PM
This course examines the process through which reading and writing are acquired by young children, ages 4-8.  We study the ways teachers can support literacy growth for children’s diverse learning needs and styles, cultural and linguistic backgrounds, and socioeconomic status.  The course explores theoretical frameworks of literacy development as well as practical applications. Graduate students work directly with a child, who is an emergent reader and writer, to develop the skills of close observation, assessment, record keeping, and planning.  Graduate students, individually and as a group, analyze the contexts, activities and relationships that support children’s language and literacy learning in early childhood classrooms.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online early childhood and childhood programs only. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each Tuesday, 7:00-9:00 PM throughout the semester. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC563R-2R The Teaching of Reading, Writing, and Language Arts in the Primary Grades 3 Online Erica Lynch T 7:00-9:00 PM
This course examines the process through which reading and writing are acquired by young children, ages 4-8.  We study the ways teachers can support literacy growth for children’s diverse learning needs and styles, cultural and linguistic backgrounds, and socioeconomic status.  The course explores theoretical frameworks of literacy development as well as practical applications. Graduate students work directly with a child, who is an emergent reader and writer, to develop the skills of close observation, assessment, record keeping, and planning.  Graduate students, individually and as a group, analyze the contexts, activities and relationships that support children’s language and literacy learning in early childhood classrooms.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online early childhood and childhood programs only. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each Tuesday, 7:00-9:00 PM throughout the semester. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC931R-1R Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 6 Online Staff TBD W 7:00-9:00 PM
Fieldwork in appropriate settings with supervision and advisement. Candidates in advisement participate in weekly small-group conferences with their advisor. These seminars include the exchange and analysis of ongoing professional experiences and provide a forum for integrating theory with practice. Participants will develop their capacity to construct learning environments and communities that support the development of infants, children, and/or adolescents, depending on the focus of their program. Opportunities to collaborate and co-teach with cooperating teachers and other setting personnel are an integral part of the course. This course is is the second half of EDUC930R.
This course is the second half of EDUC930R. This course is for students in the online early childhood and childhood programs only.
EDUC937R-1R Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 6 Online Staff TBD W 4:45-6:45 PM
Fieldwork in appropriate settings with supervision and advisement. Candidates in advisement participate in weekly small-group conferences with their advisor. These seminars include the exchange and analysis of ongoing professional experiences and provide a forum for integrating theory with practice. Participants will develop their capacity to construct learning environments and communities that support the development of infants, children, and/or adolescents, depending on the focus of their program. Opportunities to collaborate and co-teach with cooperating teachers and other setting personnel are an integral part of the course. This course is for one semester only.
This course is for students in the online early childhood and childhood programs only.
IMP3R-1R Mentored Directed Essay 0 Online Staff TBD See mentor
Students choosing to do a Mentored Directed Essay work with an assigned faculty mentor to design an essay that is based on existing, program-specific prepared questions. These questions are designed to help you think and write about the salient issues pertaining to your chosen area of study. Working with your mentor, you may adapt questions to support the distinctive needs of your professional growth, interests, and current work situation. This option is designed to provide structure and focus with maximum flexibility, and is intended to be completed within a single semester. This option is offered all semesters.

Students should register for section 01. In January, students will be assigned their particular mentor. Registration is not allowed after January 29, 2023, and it is recommended that students register as early as possible, to allow themselves the maximum amount of time to work on their essay questions. Students who register on January 29 will still be required to turn in their completed essay questions to their mentor by the last day of the term.

Students completing a Mentored Directed Essay (MDE) should find the essay for their program and become familiar with the project before meeting with their mentors. To access the MDE, log into myBSC and go to Resources > Integrative Master's Project (IMP).

IS500R-1R Independent Study 0 Online Staff TBD See mentor
The Independent Study is an original work that you initiate, often growing out of a meaningful course assignment or an idea, question, or experience rooted in a fieldwork or work setting. Students work with a faculty mentor who has expertise in the particular area of study. The Independent Study usually includes two semesters of research and writing, and is most closely aligned with a traditional master’s thesis. Independent Studies are made accessible to the public though the Bank Street Library's online catalogue.

Students should register only at the beginning of their Independent Study. Students continuing an Independent Study from a previous semester should contact their Student Services Advisor before registering.

Registration is not allowed after January 19, 2023.

IMPORTANT NOTE TO STUDENTS REGISTERING FOR INDEPENDENT STUDIES: In order to register for an Independent Study (IS500R) you must have already secured a faculty mentor who has reviewed your proposal and has committed to serving as your mentor. By registering for IS500R, you are attesting to having secured a mentor, and you are agreeing to follow all applicable Independent Study directives and guidelines as stated in A Guide to the Integrative Master’s Project.

In addition to registering through my.BSC for IS500R, please fill out the Independent Study Mentor Form, indicating which faculty member has consented to mentor you.

Please note: Students who register without completing the above form will be dropped from their Independent Study. You must identify your mentor in order to be enrolled in an Independent Study for the term.

Early Childhood General and Special Education Online Program

These courses are only for students enrolled in a fully online degree program.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
EDUC514R-1R Curriculum in Early Childhood Education for Inclusive and Special Education Settings 3 Online Soyoung Park TH 7:00-9:00 PM
This course provides a framework for developing curriculum that engages all children in authentic meaning making about themselves and their wider world.  Participants use principles of child development and developmental variation as a foundation for planning experiences that support deep learning.  The course focuses on curriculum as the core vehicle for affirming children’s developing identities, including cultural and linguistic identity. Using social studies as the core of an integrated curriculum, participants plan using diverse materials, modalities, content, and perspectives to help children examine big questions. Participants use universal design principles to create learning experiences that are inclusive of a broadly diverse range of learners.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online early childhood programs only. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each Thursday, 7:00-9:00 PM throughout the semester. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC530R-1R Foundations of Modern Education 3 Online Martha Andrews TH 7:00-9:00 PM
This course examines the historical, philosophical, and cultural roots of contemporary education, including Bank Street’s progressive history and philosophy, the contributions of major educational leaders, and current practices and innovations in education. Participants will analyze how critical issues in the field affect their practice with children and families in schools and communities. The course will explore ways in which education as an avenue for individual advancement and social justice has been defined, advocated for, enacted, and is still being negotiated in the U.S. The course will attend to what has been achieved as well as challenges that remain in creating educational spaces that affirm children’s and families’ race, social class, immigration status, language, gender, and ability, among other identity domains. Participants will apply their understandings to think about their role in bringing about desired, warranted changes in order to create more inclusive and democratic educational environments.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online early childhood and childhood programs only. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each Thursday, 7:00-9:00 PM throughout the semester. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC530R-2R Foundations of Modern Education 3 Online Pamela Jones TH 7:00-9:00 PM
This course examines the historical, philosophical, and cultural roots of contemporary education, including Bank Street’s progressive history and philosophy, the contributions of major educational leaders, and current practices and innovations in education. Participants will analyze how critical issues in the field affect their practice with children and families in schools and communities. The course will explore ways in which education as an avenue for individual advancement and social justice has been defined, advocated for, enacted, and is still being negotiated in the U.S. The course will attend to what has been achieved as well as challenges that remain in creating educational spaces that affirm children’s and families’ race, social class, immigration status, language, gender, and ability, among other identity domains. Participants will apply their understandings to think about their role in bringing about desired, warranted changes in order to create more inclusive and democratic educational environments.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online early childhood and childhood programs only. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each Thursday, 7:00-9:00 PM throughout the semester. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC563R-1R The Teaching of Reading, Writing, and Language Arts in the Primary Grades 3 Online Xiania Foster T 7:00-9:00 PM
This course examines the process through which reading and writing are acquired by young children, ages 4-8.  We study the ways teachers can support literacy growth for children’s diverse learning needs and styles, cultural and linguistic backgrounds, and socioeconomic status.  The course explores theoretical frameworks of literacy development as well as practical applications. Graduate students work directly with a child, who is an emergent reader and writer, to develop the skills of close observation, assessment, record keeping, and planning.  Graduate students, individually and as a group, analyze the contexts, activities and relationships that support children’s language and literacy learning in early childhood classrooms.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online early childhood and childhood programs only. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each Tuesday, 7:00-9:00 PM throughout the semester. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC563R-2R The Teaching of Reading, Writing, and Language Arts in the Primary Grades 3 Online Erica Lynch T 7:00-9:00 PM
This course examines the process through which reading and writing are acquired by young children, ages 4-8.  We study the ways teachers can support literacy growth for children’s diverse learning needs and styles, cultural and linguistic backgrounds, and socioeconomic status.  The course explores theoretical frameworks of literacy development as well as practical applications. Graduate students work directly with a child, who is an emergent reader and writer, to develop the skills of close observation, assessment, record keeping, and planning.  Graduate students, individually and as a group, analyze the contexts, activities and relationships that support children’s language and literacy learning in early childhood classrooms.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online early childhood and childhood programs only. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each Tuesday, 7:00-9:00 PM throughout the semester. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC893R-1R Approaches to Early Childhood Assessment 2 Online Ross Harold T 7:00-9:00 PM
This course introduces and explores informal and formal assessment practices for young children. Students will learn about various ways of observing, collecting, documenting, and analyzing children’s work and learning experiences in a variety of settings. Students will also become familiar with formal and informal assessment procedures and terminology, standardized testing, and strategies for test selection, to ensure results that are valid and unbiased. Students will also examine legal, ethical, culturally responsive, and professional considerations of assessment. Students will be given practical experience in the preparation and administration of different forms of assessment, including the construction of simple performance assessments. Critical attention will be given to careful interpretation and utilization of assessment data in developing meaningful curriculum and educational plans for individual children. Culturally responsive approaches to assessment and involving the family with the assessment process will also be addressed. Prerequisite: EDUC 803 or EDUC 894.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online early childhood programs only. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each Tuesday 7:00-9:00 PM throughout the semester. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC895R-1R Early Childhood Practicum II: Collaborating w Families and Colleagues in Assess, Plan, and Instr 2 Online Carmen Colón TH 7:00-9:00 PM
This course completes a year-long sequence of work with a child and the child’s family. The focus in the second semester is two-fold: 1) developing a responsive collaboration with the family and 2) developing and analyzing the use of a range of instructional strategies. Through conversations, participants learn about the family’s perspectives and goals. To gather further data, participants select, develop, and use a variety of informal assessments. Participants apply their developing knowledge of the child’s interests and developmental needs as they design and implement instructional strategies. The course engages participants in a deep understanding of the assessment, planning and instruction cycle as they collect data and reflect on their instruction and apply their learnings in their ongoing work with the child and family.  Participants will work with families to jointly plan goals as they develop their understandings of the IEP/IFSP. Prerequisite: EDUC 894.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online early childhood programs only. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each Thursday 7:00-9:00 PM throughout the semester. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC931R-1R Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 6 Online Staff TBD W 7:00-9:00 PM
Fieldwork in appropriate settings with supervision and advisement. Candidates in advisement participate in weekly small-group conferences with their advisor. These seminars include the exchange and analysis of ongoing professional experiences and provide a forum for integrating theory with practice. Participants will develop their capacity to construct learning environments and communities that support the development of infants, children, and/or adolescents, depending on the focus of their program. Opportunities to collaborate and co-teach with cooperating teachers and other setting personnel are an integral part of the course. This course is is the second half of EDUC930R.
This course is the second half of EDUC930R. This course is for students in the online early childhood and childhood programs only.
EDUC937R-1R Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 6 Online Staff TBD W 4:45-6:45 PM
Fieldwork in appropriate settings with supervision and advisement. Candidates in advisement participate in weekly small-group conferences with their advisor. These seminars include the exchange and analysis of ongoing professional experiences and provide a forum for integrating theory with practice. Participants will develop their capacity to construct learning environments and communities that support the development of infants, children, and/or adolescents, depending on the focus of their program. Opportunities to collaborate and co-teach with cooperating teachers and other setting personnel are an integral part of the course. This course is for one semester only.
This course is for students in the online early childhood and childhood programs only.
IMP3R-1R Mentored Directed Essay 0 Online Staff TBD See mentor
Students choosing to do a Mentored Directed Essay work with an assigned faculty mentor to design an essay that is based on existing, program-specific prepared questions. These questions are designed to help you think and write about the salient issues pertaining to your chosen area of study. Working with your mentor, you may adapt questions to support the distinctive needs of your professional growth, interests, and current work situation. This option is designed to provide structure and focus with maximum flexibility, and is intended to be completed within a single semester. This option is offered all semesters.

Students should register for section 01. In January, students will be assigned their particular mentor. Registration is not allowed after January 29, 2023, and it is recommended that students register as early as possible, to allow themselves the maximum amount of time to work on their essay questions. Students who register on January 29 will still be required to turn in their completed essay questions to their mentor by the last day of the term.

Students completing a Mentored Directed Essay (MDE) should find the essay for their program and become familiar with the project before meeting with their mentors. To access the MDE, log into myBSC and go to Resources > Integrative Master's Project (IMP).

IS500R-1R Independent Study 0 Online Staff TBD See mentor
The Independent Study is an original work that you initiate, often growing out of a meaningful course assignment or an idea, question, or experience rooted in a fieldwork or work setting. Students work with a faculty mentor who has expertise in the particular area of study. The Independent Study usually includes two semesters of research and writing, and is most closely aligned with a traditional master’s thesis. Independent Studies are made accessible to the public though the Bank Street Library's online catalogue.

Students should register only at the beginning of their Independent Study. Students continuing an Independent Study from a previous semester should contact their Student Services Advisor before registering.

Registration is not allowed after January 19, 2023.

IMPORTANT NOTE TO STUDENTS REGISTERING FOR INDEPENDENT STUDIES: In order to register for an Independent Study (IS500R) you must have already secured a faculty mentor who has reviewed your proposal and has committed to serving as your mentor. By registering for IS500R, you are attesting to having secured a mentor, and you are agreeing to follow all applicable Independent Study directives and guidelines as stated in A Guide to the Integrative Master’s Project.

In addition to registering through my.BSC for IS500R, please fill out the Independent Study Mentor Form, indicating which faculty member has consented to mentor you.

Please note: Students who register without completing the above form will be dropped from their Independent Study. You must identify your mentor in order to be enrolled in an Independent Study for the term.

Early Childhood General Education Advanced Standing

These courses are for students in the Early Childhood General Education Advanced Standing program only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
EDUC803A-1A Developmental Variations 2 702 Jacob Dixon W 4:45-7:45 PM 1/17, 1/31, 2/14, 2/28, 3/13, 3/27, 4/10
This course is designed to increase participants’ awareness and understanding of the educational, social, cultural, linguistic and developmental implications of disability from historical, legal, and socio-political perspectives. The course will critically examine state and federal special education and disability laws and regulations and their implementation across a range of settings including their intersection with issues of race, class, language and gender. There is an emphasis on understanding how disability is socially constructed at the levels of family, community, school, and the larger society.  Participants apply an understanding of developmental variations to analyze and create accessible learning experiences for children. Prerequisite: EDUC 500 or permission of instructor. This course is only for students in the Early Childhood Advanced Standing Program.
Notes: This section is for students in the Early Childhood Advanced Standing Cohort only. The remaining seven hours of the course will occur through asynchronous engagement.
EDUC895A-1A Early Childhood Practicum II: Collaborating w Families and Colleagues in Assess, Plan, and Instr 2 705 Carmen Colón T 4:45-6:45 PM
This course completes a year-long sequence of work with a child and the child’s family. The focus in the second semester is two-fold: 1) developing a responsive collaboration with the family and 2) developing and analyzing the use of a range of instructional strategies. Through conversations, participants learn about the family’s perspectives and goals. To gather further data, participants select, develop, and use a variety of informal assessments. Participants apply their developing knowledge of the child’s interests and developmental needs as they design and implement instructional strategies. The course engages participants in a deep understanding of the assessment, planning and instruction cycle as they collect data and reflect on their instruction and apply their learnings in their ongoing work with the child and family.  Participants will work with families to jointly plan goals as they develop their understandings of the IEP/IFSP. Prerequisite: EDUC 894.
Notes: This section is for students in the Early Childhood Advanced Standing Cohort only.
EDUC934A-1 Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 3 Staff TBD W 5:00-7:00 PM
This course is the second half of EDUC932A. This course is only for students in the Early Childhood Advanced Standing cohort.

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
TESL563-1 The Teaching of Reading, Writing, & Language Arts in ENL Settings (PreK-12) 3 703 Katie Caster M 7:00-9:00 PM
This course addresses the ways in which language, cognition, and the socio-emotional development of students shape and are shaped by effective reading, writing, and language arts instruction. Employing a social constructivist perspective, the course prepares teachers to meet the needs of students from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Participants will explore how emergent bilingual students utilize their entire linguistic repertoire, as well as their cultural and family backgrounds when learning to speak, listen, read, and write in a new language. Participants will recognize how home languages and language varieties impact the selection of readings, writing assignments, feedback, error analysis, and the interpretation of literacy assessments. Participants will explore approaches for teaching phonics, multimodal composition, rhetorical genre studies (RGS), and translingual research to develop flexible and culturally responsive literacy practices. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which ENL teachers can collaborate with classroom teachers to develop literacy goals for students with varied language proficiencies (entering, emerging, transitional, expanding, and commanding) and developing literacy skills. Participants will also explore how to create portable and fixed learning environments that support a balanced approach to literacy, as well as explore ways to use age-appropriate technology to support students’ multimodal literacy development. In addition to gaining a deeper understanding of the reading and writing processes, participants will better define their roles as literacy teachers and advocates of literacy practices that support emergent bilingual students. Prerequisite: TESL 530.
Note: This course is for students in the TESOL Residency Program only
TESL661-1 TESOL Research & Methodologies (Grades 7-12) 3 705 Jillian Hakemian T 7:00-9:00 PM
This course builds on the content covered in the Research and Methodologies (PreK-6) course by exploring the TESOL language learning methods and research that apply in middle and high school settings.  Special attention will be paid to the social, emotional, and academic needs of adolescents with interrupted formal education (SIFE) and long-term English language learners (LTELLs).  Participants will develop an understanding of how adolescent identity, language proficiency levels (entering, emerging, transitional, expanding, and commanding), middle and high school culture and curriculum, and local and state assessments all impact planning and instruction for adolescent ENLs.  Using this grounding, participants will determine appropriate language materials, instructional technology, translanguaging strategies, environmental supports, and effective ENL service models to differentiate for the diverse listening, speaking, reading, and writing abilities and needs of their emergent bilingual students across the content areas. Participants will develop skills in collaborating with a range of colleagues to create inclusive learning environments and effective classroom management strategies aimed at integrating emergent bilingual adolescents fully into their classroom communities. The course will explore how participants can advocate for an integrated and flexible role of ENL service delivery, preparing participants to design both stand-alone and integrated ENL experiences, as well as differentiating existing curriculum to better meet the needs of students. Prerequisite: TESL 660.
Note: This course is for students in the TESOL Residency Program only. This course will meet fully synchronously online.

NY DOE Teaching Fellows

These courses are for students in the NYC Teaching Fellows Cohort only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
EDUC526R-1 Teaching Math, Science and Tech: Curriculum, Methods and Assessment for Adolescents w Disabilities 3 Online Kelly Molloy T 6:00-8:00 PM
Note: This course is for students in the NYC Teaching Fellows Cohort only. This course will meet fully synchronously online.
EDUC804-1 Supporting Language and Literacy Development Across the Curriculum: 7-12 3 703 Shawna Hansford W 7:00-9:00 PM
This course introduces first and second language acquisition theories and research and their practical implications for developing a repertoire of strategies for teaching language and literacy to adolescents with a range of abilities. This course provides a framework for understanding how language, cognition, and social development interact with literacy and content learning in a sociopolitical context.  Participants investigate the crucial role and impact of teacher language attitudes through a sociolinguistic lens informed by current and historical concerns of inequity for students from a range of linguistic and cultural backgrounds. Participants examine how both monolingual and emergent bilingual students use their entire linguistic repertoire in order to develop literacy in English language arts and in the content areas.  Participants learn approaches to assessing adolescents’ language and literacy needs as well as ways to analyze text forms, both print and electronic, in terms of the kinds of responses they call for from learners and the support they offer to adolescents’ conceptual understanding. The course will investigate teaching new literacies in a multicultural context. There is a fieldwork component to this course. Prerequisite: EDUC 502. (Pending approval of the Program Review and Curriculum Committee)
Note: This course is for students in the NYC Teaching Fellows Cohort only. This course will meet on campus 1/17, 1/31, 2/14, 2/28, 3/13, 3/20, 4/3 remaining sessions will be held asynchronously online.

NY DOE Teaching Collaborative

These courses are for students in the NYCTC Cohort only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
EDUC835-1 Formal and Informal Assessment of Adolescents with Disabilities 1 705 Raul Palacios W 7:00-9:00 PM 1/17, 1/24, 1/31, 2/7, 2/28, 3/6
This course is designed to develop an understanding of formal and informal assessment techniques used to identify the learning needs of adolescents with disabilities. Students will become familiar with commonly used psychological and achievement tests as well as understand the need for adaptive measures during the evaluation process. The emphasis is on how to use both formal and informal assessment data to develop instructional plans to meet the unique needs of adolescents with a range of abilities and challenges. The historical as well as current legal and ethical considerations, appropriate practices and limitations when working with students of diverse backgrounds and their families will be a theme throughout the course. Topics such as student self-assessment, vocational assessment, exit portfolios, alternative assessment, transition planning and wraparound services will be discussed with a focus on advocacy and equity.
Note: This course is for students in the NYC Teaching Collaborative Cohort only.
EDUC837-1 Integrative Master’s Project 1 707 Shawna Hansford TW 5:30-7:00 PM 1/16, 2/27, 3/5, 4/17
The Integrative Master’s Project (IMP) is one of the three major components of your degree requirements. As the culminating component, it is a significant, academically rigorous body of work that integrates many facets of your experiences at Bank Street and in the field, and applies theoretical knowledge to your current and future work as an educator. The process of writing the IMP is intended to further your professional growth through inquiry, reflection, and integration. The form and content of each IMP varies according to specific program requirements.
Note: This course is for students in the NYC Teaching Collaborative Cohort only. 1/16, 2/27, and 3/5 will be online sessions from 5:30-7pm. 4/17 will be an onground session from 7-8:30pm. Students will also need to participate in the IMP shares on May 1st from 5:30-8:00pm.

Progressive Leadership Online Program - Cohort 49

Courses within this program are for Online Progressive Leadership Cohort 49 students only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD603R-1R School Change: The Transformational Leader 3 Online Talibah Daniel T 5:30-7:30 PM
Current school reform efforts emphasize vision, shared decision making, professional autonomy, positive school structure, and restructuring. How are these concepts being realized in current practice? What choices and constraints accompany the processes of change and staff empowerment? In this course students examine the concepts which face principals in enhancing the effectiveness of schools, as well as the competencies of planning, joint decision making, problem solving, and negotiation. Course work complements and is tailored to the Principals Institute internship experience.
Progressive Leadership Program Cohort 49 students only
LEAD615R-1R Processes of Supervision and Professional Development 3 Online Abbe Futterman TH 5:30-7:30 PM
Designed for students who are preparing for supervisory roles or who are actively engaged in such roles, this course focuses on the objectives, functions, and evaluation of the supervisory experience within multicultural educational institutions. Organizational, cultural, and human variables that may facilitate or impede effective supervision are identified, and strategies to maximize or minimize their impact are generated. Supervisory attitudes and skills aimed at increasing professional growth in individual and group supervision are synthesized from a variety of supervisory models, with particular attention given to the clinical supervision model.
Progressive Leadership Program Cohort 49 students only
LEAD9183R-1R Leadership Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 3 Online Beverly Logan W 5:00-7:00 PM
This course meets New York State certification requirements for School Building Leadership (SBL) internship experiences. Through close work with a faculty advisor and peers, participants apply their learning from coursework to their field experiences, integrating theory and practice as they reflect on their own professional development. Interns work with a site supervisor and are given substantial school-based responsibilities that involve direct interaction and involvement with staff, students, families, and community leaders. Participants develop the capacity to build and support a positive school culture, build teams, enlist collaboration, and plan and sustain change efforts. Graduate students in advisement participate in small-group sessions with their advisors. At the end of supervised fieldwork, each candidate presents a comprehensive portfolio of internship experiences which meets the program's Integrative Master's Project requirement. This is part three of three semesters of supervised fieldwork.
Progressive Leadership Program Cohort 49 students only.

Progressive Leadership Online Program - Cohort 50

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD510R-1R Leading Critical Issues in Curriculum and Instruction 3 Online Shokry Eldaly T 5:00-7:00 PM
This course focuses on the roles and functions of the school leader in the spheres of curriculum and instruction. It covers the principles and processes that inform curriculum development and their impact on student learning. By explicitly addressing the relationship between curriculum and instruction to critical theory and pedagogy, students will connect positionality to their professional noticing.   At the same time, students will unpack educational equity to become discerning consumers and negotiators of curriculum. In this course, students will envision and conceptualize ways to ensure that all students experience a liberating curriculum by focusing intensively on the knowledge and tools needed to recognize and dismantle dehumanizing spaces that are emblematic of historic and contemporary systems and structures. Finally, the course explores critical issues in leadership in curriculum and instruction and is designed to connect theory to practice as a means of inspiring, guiding, and effecting school change. For online Progressive Leadership students only.
Progressive Leadership Program Cohort 50 students only.
LEAD660R-1R Research for Educational Change 3 Online Jessica Blum-DeStefano TH 5:00-7:00 PM
This course is designed to enable leaders, teachers, special educators, and others to be effective consumers of research, as well as to plan and carry out research in response to specific educational questions. Stages of the research process are discussed. Students analyze and evaluate research in the areas of leadership, school effectiveness, administration and supervision, teaching, and curriculum reform, and apply the findings to their everyday roles as educational leaders. It is expected that this course will be valuable for those matriculated students who are initiating projects to satisfy the Independent Study requirement. The format consists of lectures and discussions of the stages of the research process. Class members participate in a project involving research design, data collection, and analysis.
Progressive Leadership Program Cohort 50 students only.
LEAD9182R-1R Leadership Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 3 Online Staff TBD W 5:00-7:00 PM
This course meets New York State certification requirements for School Building Leadership (SBL) internship experiences. Through close work with a faculty advisor and peers, participants apply their learning from coursework to their field experiences, integrating theory and practice as they reflect on their own professional development. Interns work with a site supervisor and are given substantial school-based responsibilities that involve direct interaction and involvement with staff, students, families, and community leaders. Participants develop the capacity to build and support a positive school culture, build teams, enlist collaboration, and plan and sustain change efforts. Graduate students in advisement participate in small-group sessions with their advisors. At the end of supervised fieldwork, each candidate presents a comprehensive portfolio of internship experiences which meets the program's Integrative Master's Project requirement. This is part two of three semesters of supervised fieldwork. The third part is LEAD9183R.
Progressive Leadership Program Cohort 50 students only.

Progressive Leadership Online Program - Cohort 51

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD503R-1R Adult Development: Implications for Educational Leadership 3 Online Jessica Blum-DeStefano TH 7:15-9:15 PM
Students will examine the developmental periods of young, middle, and later years in the human life cycle, with a broad multicultural approach to learning and development. Studies and research are reviewed. Emphasis is given to developmental characteristics that have implications for professional growth and development. For online Progressive Leadership students only.
This course is for students in the Progressive Leadership Program Cohort 51 and Early Childhood Leadership cohort only.
LEAD537R-1R Organizational Development: Implications for Educational Leadership 3 Online Lydia Colón León T 5:30-7:30 PM
This course examines theory, research, and practice related to organizational development. It covers a wide range of issues related to capacity-building, school vision and culture, and problem solving, and focuses on the relationship between school management and instructional leadership. Students have opportunities to integrate theory and research with administrative practice through readings, small-group work, simulation experiences, observations, interviews, protocols, and case studies.
Progressive Leadership Program Cohort 51 students only
LEAD9181R-1R Leadership Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 3 Online Gillian Smith W 5:00-7:00 PM
This course meets New York State certification requirements for School Building Leadership (SBL) internship experiences. Through close work with a faculty advisor and peers, participants apply their learning from coursework to their field experiences, integrating theory and practice as they reflect on their own professional development. Interns work with a site supervisor and are given substantial school-based responsibilities that involve direct interaction and involvement with staff, students, families, and community leaders. Participants develop the capacity to build and support a positive school culture, build teams, enlist collaboration, and plan and sustain change efforts. Graduate students in advisement participate in small-group sessions with their advisors. At the end of supervised fieldwork, each candidate presents a comprehensive portfolio of internship experiences which meets the program's Integrative Master's Project requirement. This is part one of three semesters of supervised fieldwork. The second part is LEAD9182R.
Progressive Leadership Program Cohort 51 students only.

Leadership in Mathematics Education Online

Courses within this program are for Online Math Leadership students only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD615-1 Processes of Supervision and Professional Development 3 Wendy Pollock TH 7:00-9:00 PM
Designed for students who are preparing for supervisory roles or who are actively engaged in such roles, this course focuses on the objectives, functions, and evaluation of the supervisory experience within multicultural educational institutions. Organizational, cultural, and human variables that may facilitate or impede effective supervision are identified, and strategies to maximize or minimize their impact are generated. Supervisory attitudes and skills aimed at increasing professional growth in individual and group supervision are synthesized from a variety of supervisory models, with particular attention given to the clinical supervision model.
LEAD668-1 Research for Mathematics Leaders II 1 Online Helen Spruill T 7:00-9:00 PM 1/23, 2/6, 2/20, 3/5, 3/19, 4/9, 4/23
In this second course, students are supported in deepening their question from LEAD 667. Through the collection of additional data, the analysis of new data, and examining patterns and themes, students craft a deeper question that reflects the depth of an Integrated Masters Project (IMP). This question aligns with leadership standards and reflects a culminating lens. Prerequisite: LEAD 667.
Note: This course is co-taught with Robin Hummel
LEAD9452-1 Mathematics Leadership Supervised Fieldwork and Advisement 2 Online Jerome Ellison T 7:00-9:00 PM 1/16, 1/30, 2/13, 2/27, 3/12, 4/2, 4/16
This seminar and fieldwork experience consists of a cohort of graduate students who meet with their advisor throughout the 14 months of the program. The seminar includes the exchange and analysis of ongoing professional experiences based on the graduate students’ experiences in the field. It provides a forum for synthesizing theory with practice, and the creation of a professional learning community. Attention is given to leadership activities in students’ work settings and coaching strategies for addressing the academic strengths and needs of teachers of mathematics, including constructing classroom environments that support collaboration and agency. In addition, the seminar examines the historical, philosophical, and cultural roots of leadership as they have influenced current practices and innovations, and explores Bank Street's history and philosophy as a progressive institution. This is the third term of SFW.

Future School Leaders Academy

Courses within this program are for FSLA students only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD510F-1F Leading Critical Issues in Curriculum and Instruction 3 Offsite Keturah Proctor TH 4:00-6:00 PM
These courses are for students in the FSLA program only.
LEAD604F-1F Development of Educational Policy 1 Offsite Raymond Sanchez TH 4:00-6:00 PM
This course is designed to provide students with an under-standing of policy making at the local, state, and federal levels. Current issues and trends in education as they pertain to policy making are addressed. Students examine the forces that influence policy formulation and implementation at these three levels.
These courses are for students in the FSLA program only.
LEAD862F-1F Leading a School District II 1 Offsite Andrew Patrick TH 6:30-8:30 PM
These courses are for students in the FSLA program only.
LEAD9062F-1F Future School Leaders Academy Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 1.5 Offsite Staff TBD W 5:00-7:00 PM
This is the second part of SFW course LEAD9061. These courses are for students in the FSLA program only.

Museum Studies: Learning and Engagement in Museums and Cultural Organizations

Courses within this program are for LEMCO students only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD508-1 Programming with Diverse Publics 2 Saralyn Rosenfield T 6:30-8:30 PM 2/6, 2/13, 2/20, 2/27, 3/5, 3/12, 3/26, 4/2
A salient feature of educational work across museums, libraries and cultural organizations is the planning and delivery of a range of programs. A critical challenge in current programming is to foster greater diversity and access, to provide programming that is inclusive and welcoming for all, while continuing to serve existing audiences. The course will emphasize the importance of working with diverse publics (not for them) and what barriers exist that may be limiting participation. Participants explore different categories of programs that may be less familiar to participants and will be asked to walk through the many steps of planning a program or resource at a specific site for an intended audience. Participants will also factor in operational constraints such as time, people, scheduling and the available spaces in which programs happen.
LEAD509-1 Digital Learning 1 Emily Kotecki T/Su 6:30-8:30 PM 1/16, 1/21, 1/23, 1/28, 1/30
This course reviews the growing presence of digital learning in education, within organizations, and through informal social media networks and other online communities of interest. Is technology changing how our brains process information? Are we learning differently now? How can the new digital technologies support and expand the work that we do in education within museums, libraries and cultural organizations? How can educators in cultural organizations make thoughtful and strategic use of these new tools, without being overwhelmed by the continual churn, expense and allure of new apps, platforms, products and services? Participants will explore the notion of connected or shared learning in more depth and devise strategies and programs where new technologies can be effectively harnessed to support and expand learning and engagement.
LEAD516-1 Designing Educational Exhibits and Spaces 2 Brian Hogarth Sun 6:30-8:30PM 2/4, 2/11, 2/18, 2/25, 3/10, 3/14
Exhibitions are more than just ‘stuff’ on display. They are about dynamic interactions and responses among people in physical spaces moving about in real time. Participants will look at exhibitions as a major program vehicle in museums as well as libraries and other cultural institutions, with the many implications of identifying audiences, supporting the mission, and appealing to the market. Throughout the course, we will think about how to maximize the learning and engagement potential of exhibits. Participants will review design elements of effective spaces, interpretive planning in exhibits, and how to rapidly prototype ideas with the public for greater input and feedback.

In addition to the zoom session dates listed, there will be in-person events at the following days and times:

  • In-person workshop at Bank Street Saturday, March 2 (10-5pm)
  • In person exhibition visits offsite NYC Sunday, March 3 (10-5pm)
  • In person exhibition visits offsite NYC Sat/Sunday April 6 & 7 (10-5pm)
LEAD517-1 Partnerships and Collaborations 1 Shirley Brown-Alleyne TTH 6:30-8:30 PM 4/4, 4/9, 4/11, 4/1, 4/23
As museums and cultural organizations focus more attention on social value and public impact, it is essential for educators and other staff to cultivate knowledge of, and practice in, developing partnerships and collaborations. Participants will situate their collaborative educational work within expansive models such as learning ecosystems, to allow different organizations to do more in their communities by working together. These initiatives are promulgated by the hyperconnectivity of digital connections, allowing players in disparate locations to act quickly and more easily together. The course will include case studies of successful partnerships as well as techniques that foster productive interactions among different groups by articulating shared interests and the various assets that partners bring to the equation.
LEAD522-1 Leadership Development 1 Shokry Eldaly TTH 6:30-8:30 PM 1/16, 1/18, 1/23, 1/25, 1/30
In this course, participants will explore major theories of management, leadership and followership that can serve them in meeting the challenges of everyday work life and issues facing the sector. They will take a broad look at leadership and followership as intentional features of professional practice, including knowing oneself as essential for enacting effective leadership. Participants will review traditional views of leadership as residing in positions of authority together with shared and distributed models for leading and following for broader impact and change. By doing so, they will think about leadership and followership as fluid roles enacted by individuals across an organization at many levels.
LEAD523-1 Organizational Dynamics 2 Brian Hogarth TH 6:30-8:30 PM 2/8, 2/15, 2/22, 2/29, 3/7, 3/14, 3/28, 4/4
This course will help participants develop an organizational mindset-- to see how their job fits into the “bigger picture,” to work more effectively with other departments and individuals that may appear to have conflicting interests and priorities so that the organization can fulfill its mission and purpose. Participants will study the dynamic nature of organizations through frames and systems, team work as well as communications and negotiation. They will consider organizational culture, the challenges associated with change, transparency and becoming more diverse and inclusive. Participants will use  their current workplaces or internship organizations as case studies for various course activities and assignments.
LEAD524-1 Professional Development 1 Elisabeth Nevins TTH 6:30-8:30 PM 4/9, 4/11, 4/16, 4/18, 4/23, 4/28
This course focuses on the current trajectory of each participant in terms of their professional development. Participants will examine their individual strengths and challenges, practice speaking up and articulating what they value and stand for, for example championing social justice and advocating for the needs of diverse learners. The course will also touch on labor and current hiring practices (including bias and discrimination), basic management principles, updating professional goals, public profiles and fine-tuning skills around listening and personal reflection. This course will complement the second semester of advising/fieldwork together with the Organizational Dynamics course to strengthen each participant’s skills and competencies.
LEAD9612-1 Museum Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 4 Staff TBD See advisor
Fieldwork in an appropriate setting with supervision and advisement.
Arranged independently at different times based on students' work schedules.

LEAP Program

Courses within this program are for LEAP students only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD503L-1L Adult Development: Implications for Educational Leadership 3 Nicole Limperopulos W 4:00-6:30 PM
Students will examine the developmental periods of young, middle, and later years in the human life cycle, with a broad multicultural approach to learning and development. Studies and research are reviewed. Emphasis is given to developmental characteristics that have implications for professional growth and development.
LEAD603L-1L School Change: The Transformational Leader 3 Nicole Limperopulos W 4:00-6:30 PM
Current school reform efforts emphasize vision, shared decision making, professional autonomy, positive school structure, and restructuring. How are these concepts being realized in current practice? What choices and constraints accompany the processes of change and staff empowerment? In this course students examine the concepts which face principals in enhancing the effectiveness of schools, as well as the competencies of planning, joint decision making, problem solving, and negotiation. Course work complements and is tailored to the Principals Institute internship experience.
LEAD615L-1L Processes of Supervision and Professional Development 3 Nicole Limperopulos W 4:00-6:30 PM
Designed for students who are preparing for supervisory roles or who are actively engaged in such roles, this course focuses on the objectives, functions, and evaluation of the supervisory experience within multicultural educational institutions. Organizational, cultural, and human variables that may facilitate or impede effective supervision are identified, and strategies to maximize or minimize their impact are generated. Supervisory attitudes and skills aimed at increasing professional growth in individual and group supervision are synthesized from a variety of supervisory models, with particular attention given to the clinical supervision model.
LEAD9182L-1L Leadership Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 3 Nicole Limperopulos W 4:00-6:30 PM
These courses are for students in the LEAP program only.

Early Childhood Leadership Online Program

Courses within this program are for Early Childhood Leadership students only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD503R-1R Adult Development: Implications for Educational Leadership 3 Online Jessica Blum-DeStefano TH 7:15-9:15 PM
Students will examine the developmental periods of young, middle, and later years in the human life cycle, with a broad multicultural approach to learning and development. Studies and research are reviewed. Emphasis is given to developmental characteristics that have implications for professional growth and development. For online Progressive Leadership students only.
This course is for students in the Progressive Leadership Program Cohort 51 and Early Childhood Leadership cohort only.
LEAD615E-1E Processes of Supervision and Professional Development 3 Online Wendy Pollock T 6:30-8:30 PM
Designed for students who are preparing for supervisory roles or who are actively engaged in such roles, this course focuses on the objectives, functions, and evaluation of the supervisory experience within multicultural educational institutions. Organizational, cultural, and human variables that may facilitate or impede effective supervision are identified, and strategies to maximize or minimize their impact are generated. Supervisory attitudes and skills aimed at increasing professional growth in individual and group supervision are synthesized from a variety of supervisory models, with particular attention given to the clinical supervision model.
LEAD9202E-1E Early Childhood Leadership Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 3 Online Wendy Pollock W 5:00-7:00 PM
Participants explore a variety of theories and methods of analysis as applied to organizations and their members. Each participant prepares an in-depth analysis of his or her work setting, focusing on organizational structure and behavior.

School District Leader Online Program

Courses within this program are for online students only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD861R-1S Leading a School District I 1 Online Alice Gottlieb, Brian Monahan T 5:00-6:00 PM 1/23/24
This course focuses on the key constituencies in a district and the different relationships that exist among them. It includes understanding the district’s vision, how it was developed, and how it is sustained. The course also examines a district’s demographic and achievement data.
Courses within this program are for online students only.
LEAD862R-1S Leading a School District II 1 Online Alice Gottlieb, Brian Monahan T 5:00-6:00 PM 2/13/24
This course looks at the varied roles and responsibilities of the superintendent/district leader and ties them to the challenges of creating and sustaining dynamic, humane, effective learning communities. It emphasizes the ways that district leaders’ decisions—in such spheres as instructional policy, planning, fiscal and human resources, facilities, legal and equity issues, accountability, and external relationships—affect schools’ capacity to engage students and strengthen achievement.
Courses within this program are for online students only.
LEAD863R-1S Leading a School District III 1 Online Alice Gottlieb, Brian Monahan T 5:00-6:00 PM 3/5/24
This course focuses on how human and financial resources are allocated in a district to support the instructional program and the goals of the superintendent and school board.
Courses within this program are for online students only.
LEAD864R-1S Leading a School District IV 1 Online Alice Gottlieb, Brian Monahan T 5:00-6:00 PM 3/26/24
This course focuses on examining a district’s budget from multiple points of view: theoretical, conceptual, and practical. Participants will become familiar with all phases of the budget process, from its inception to its implementation throughout a district. Content will be closely aligned, whenever possible, with the “real world” budgets currently in place in districts.
Courses within this program are for online students only.
LEAD870R-1S Special Education Leadership: The District Perspective 1 Online Alice Gottlieb, Brian Monahan T 5:00-6:00 PM 4/16/24
Strong leadership at the district level is essential if schools are to become positive and successful learning environments for diverse learners, including children with disabilities and those at risk of failure. This course covers issues that enhance or create obstacles for inclusive schools and communities. Issues of equity are evident in most school districts and challenge educators to transform educational environments and processes to meet diverse needs. The course will address the issue of “achievement gaps” as well as links between social class and achievement in schools.
Courses within this program are for online students only.
LEAD9081R-1S School District Leadership Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 3 Online Nancy Mann See advisor
Fieldwork in an appropriate setting with supervision and advisement.
Courses within this program are for online students only. This is the first term fieldwork course.
LEAD9082R-1S School District Leadership Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 3 Online Nancy Mann See advisor
Fieldwork in an appropriate setting with supervision and advisement.
Courses within this program are for online students only. This is the second part of SFW course LEAD9081R.

New Leaders - Cohort 1

For students in the New Leaders Cohort 1 program only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD510N-1N Leading Critical Issues in Curriculum and Instruction 3 Online Raquel Talley TH 6:30-8:30 PM 1/16/24 - 3/14/24
These courses are for students in the New Leaders program only.
LEAD615N-1N Processes of Supervision and Professional Development 3 Online Kelvin Moore TH 6:30-8:30 PM 3/24/24 - 5/16/24
These courses are for students in the New Leaders program only.
LEAD9182N-1N Leadership Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 3 Online Michelle Edwards TH 6:30-8:30 PM
These courses are for students in the New Leaders program only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status

Aspiring Superintendent's Academy

These courses are only for students in the ASA program.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD863A-1A Leading a School District III 1 Michelle Herbowy, Nicole Limperopulos W 4:00-7:00 PM
This course focuses on how human and financial resources are allocated in a district to support the instructional program and the goals of the superintendent and school board. This course is for students in the Aspiring Superintendent Academy Program only.
These courses are for students in the ASA program only.
LEAD864A-1A Leading a School District IV 1 Nicole Limperopulos W 4:00-7:00 PM
These courses are for students in the ASA program only.
LEAD870A-1A Special Education Leadership: The District Perspective 1 Nicole Limperopulos W 4:00-7:00 PM
These courses are for students in the ASA program only.
LEAD9082A-1A School District Leadership Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 3 Nicole Limperopulos W 4:00-7:00 PM
These courses are for students in the ASA program only. This is the second part of SFW course LEAD9081A.

Matriculation Maintenance

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
MMNT500-1 Matriculation Maintenance 0 Staff TBD Not applicable
A degree can only be conferred for currently enrolled students. If students are not registered for classes, the Integrative Master's Project, or supervised fieldwork in the semester they intend to graduate, they must register for matriculation maintenance by the end of the add/drop period. This situation might occur, for example, if students are completing coursework for a prior class in which they received a grade of Incomplete.
MMNT500R-1R Matriculation Maintenance 0 Staff TBD Not applicable
A degree can only be conferred for currently enrolled students. If students are not registered for classes, the Integrative Master's Project, or supervised fieldwork in the semester they intend to graduate, they must register for matriculation maintenance by the end of the add/drop period. This situation might occur, for example, if students are completing coursework for a prior class in which they received a grade of Incomplete.