Fall 2021

September 09, 2021—December 22, 2021

All three-credit courses will include 9 ½ hours of out-of-class instructional time delineated in the course syllabus. This is in addition to the regularly scheduled 14 two-hour class sessions.

Bank Street Graduate School of Education credit hour calculations for degree and certificate programs follow NYSED guidelines, which are based on the U.S. Department of Education’s definition of credit hour. Please view the Credit Hour Assignment Policy for more information.

Religious Observance: The College respects individuals’ religious observances. If you are unable to make any class session, including a Friday session, because of religious observance, please notify the course instructor by the first class session so that an alternative means can be identified for fulfilling missed class material and course assignments.

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Room Abbreviations
TBA: Room will be in person at 112, announced prior to the start of classes
Online: Course is fully online
Offsite: Course takes place offsite

CDR: Children's Dining Room
AUD: The Evelyn Rome Tabas and Daniel Tabas Auditorium

Education Courses: Dual Language/Bilingual Teacher Ed, General Teacher Ed, and Special Ed

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
EDUC500-1 Child Development 3 TBA Wendy Pollock M 7:00-9:00 PM
In this course we will examine the interactions among the cognitive, social, emotional, linguistic, and physical development of children from infancy into adolescence. We will pay close attention to children as makers of meaning in the contexts of their development, including family, school, socioeconomic class, and culture. Through reading classic and current literature, we will attend to some of the larger questions about development, such as the relationship between nature and nurture, the role of developmental theory, and the tension between the search for developmental universals and the reality of individual differences. The goal is to make developmental theory vibrant and meaningful so that the generalized theoretical child comes to enhance and inform how one understands individual children.
EDUC500-2 Child Development 3 TBA Rachel Hass TH 4:45-6:45 PM
In this course we will examine the interactions among the cognitive, social, emotional, linguistic, and physical development of children from infancy into adolescence. We will pay close attention to children as makers of meaning in the contexts of their development, including family, school, socioeconomic class, and culture. Through reading classic and current literature, we will attend to some of the larger questions about development, such as the relationship between nature and nurture, the role of developmental theory, and the tension between the search for developmental universals and the reality of individual differences. The goal is to make developmental theory vibrant and meaningful so that the generalized theoretical child comes to enhance and inform how one understands individual children.
EDUC505-1 Language Acquisition and Learning in a Linguistically Diverse Society 2 TBA Pamela Jones T 7:00-9:00 PM
Based on the belief that language is an essential foundation for learning, this course addresses the typical processes of language acquisition in mono- and multilingual learners. Participants will examine theories of language acquisition and the role that caregivers and educators play in the development of language. In addition, participants will analyze historical, political, educational, social, and emotional factors that influence the socially constructed hierarchies of language varieties. A significant part of the course will be devoted to students who learn English as an additional language. Participants will learn how to use assessment of mono- and multilingual learners to identify appropriate instructional practices for social and academic language use in a range of educational settings. Course participants will also learn about ways of collaborating with families, colleagues, specialists, administrators, and interpreters.
EDUC505-2 Language Acquisition and Learning in a Linguistically Diverse Society 2 TBA Amia Soto-Carrion TH 7:00-9:00 PM
Based on the belief that language is an essential foundation for learning, this course addresses the typical processes of language acquisition in mono- and multilingual learners. Participants will examine theories of language acquisition and the role that caregivers and educators play in the development of language. In addition, participants will analyze historical, political, educational, social, and emotional factors that influence the socially constructed hierarchies of language varieties. A significant part of the course will be devoted to students who learn English as an additional language. Participants will learn how to use assessment of mono- and multilingual learners to identify appropriate instructional practices for social and academic language use in a range of educational settings. Course participants will also learn about ways of collaborating with families, colleagues, specialists, administrators, and interpreters.
EDUC513-1 Social Studies Curriculum Development for Inclusive and Special Education Settings (Grades 1-6) 3 TBA Jared Slater M 4:45-6:45 PM
This course provides the opportunity for participants to analyze and develop integrated curricula in social studies using a sociopolitical lens. Participants integrate knowledge from the six disciplines of social studies: history, anthropology, sociology, political science, geography and economics into the design of a constructivist, inquiry-based social studies curriculum. The course explores ways children come to learn and care about themselves and others through the social studies. There is an emphasis on differentiating curriculum, including attention to diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds, and variations in development.
EDUC514-1 Curriculum in Early Childhood Education for Inclusive and Special Education Settings 3 TBA Tara Kirton TH 4:45-6:45 PM
This course provides a framework for developing curriculum that engages all children in authentic meaning making about themselves and their wider world.  Participants use principles of child development and developmental variation as a foundation for planning experiences that support deep learning.  The course focuses on curriculum as the core vehicle for affirming children’s developing identities, including cultural and linguistic identity. Using social studies as the core of an integrated curriculum, participants plan using diverse materials, modalities, content, and perspectives to help children examine big questions. Participants use universal design principles to create learning experiences that are inclusive of a broadly diverse range of learners.
EDUC515-1 Curriculum Development and Sheltered Instruction in Dual Language/ Bilingual Classrooms 3 TBA Cristian Solorza TH 7:00-9:00 PM
This course is designed to acquaint teachers with current curriculum mandates and methods of implementation in a dual language classroom. Emphasis will be placed on social studies as the core in a dual language setting, including language planning and models of authentic assessment. Participants will have the opportunity to plan and develop curricula based on principles of child development, content knowledge, and the culture and values of the community of teachers and learners. Students will develop curricula both in English and in the native language. Attention will be given to the classroom environment; the selection of materials; literature, art, and mixed media; and trips and community resources. Teacher-family partnerships will also be discussed.
Prerequisites for EDUC 515: EDUC 513 or EDUC 514; or permission of the instructor.
EDUC520-1 Educating Infants and Toddlers: Programs and Activities 3 TBA Staff TBD T 7:00-9:00 PM
Graduate students will explore aspects of the infant/ toddler curriculum through the framework of the developmental interaction approach, which uses relationship-based care to promote healthy social and emotional well-being. A major focus of the course is infant/toddler play and the adult’s role in reflecting on, supporting, and fostering play. Participants will learn to design curriculum that integrates language and literacy development; art and music; the use of expressive materials; and experiences that promote scientific and mathematical thinking. The course will prepare graduate students to critically examine the parameters of noteworthy programs for typically developing infants and toddlers as well as those with developmental variations and exposure to toxic stress. Graduate students will critique various local, national, and international exemplary and evidence-based approaches and programs. In order to concretize real-life issues, the course will include exploration of programs that serve diverse populations such as Early Intervention and Early Head Start. An overview of the early intervention law (Part C of IDEA) is included.
EDUC525-1 Assistive Technology as a Tool for Providing Educational Access 1 TBA Mark Surabian M 7:00-9:05 PM Dates: 9/13, 9/20, 9/27, 10/4, 10/18, 10/25
This course examines how technology can create opportunities for access and expression for learners, including children with variations in learning, sensory, communication, and physical development. Through readings, discussion, and experimenting with a variety of actual technologies, participants will strengthen their capacities to match such tools to learner needs in diverse learning environments and activities. Participants will reflect on classroom experiences to ascertain how accessibility for learners can beenhanced. They will consider broader issues of access and equity, as they deepen their understandings of how technology can assist in creating more inclusive learning environments.
EDUC530-1 Foundations of Modern Education 3 TBA Pamela Jones TH 7:00-9:00 PM
This course examines the historical, philosophical, and cultural roots of contemporary education, including Bank Street’s progressive history and philosophy, the contributions of major educational leaders, and current practices and innovations in education. Participants will analyze how critical issues in the field affect their practice with children and families in schools and communities. The course will explore ways in which education as an avenue for individual advancement and social justice has been defined, advocated for, enacted, and is still being negotiated in the U.S. The course will attend to what has been achieved as well as challenges that remain in creating educational spaces that affirm children’s and families’ race, social class, immigration status, language, gender, and ability, among other identity domains. Participants will apply their understandings to think about their role in bringing about desired, warranted changes in order to create more inclusive and democratic educational environments.
EDUC535-1 Science for Teachers (Grades N - 6) 2 TBA Stan Chu T 4:45-6:45 PM
Science for Teachers focuses on developing a science way of thinking and doing in PreK-6th grade classrooms. Each session deepens an understanding that doing science requires direct sensory encounters with the physical world. By experiencing first-hand investigations of physical and biological materials and related phenomena, participants create a range of representations that can uncover existing patterns and concepts. Discussions, readings, and reflective writings deepen and broaden work done with physical materials. Participants will reflect on their own learning as they work to construct meaningful science experiences that respond to the developmental levels of their students and affirm students’ cultural, linguistic, and learning diversity. The course explores evidence-based ways of making sense of the world that support the integration of science inquiry across the curriculum.
EDUC540-1 Mathematics for Teachers in Diverse and Inclusive Educational Settings (Grades N - 6) 2 TBA Amy Withers TH 7:00-9:00 PM
This course provides participants with an overview of mathematics learning for children grades N-6. Participants deepen their own mathematical knowledge while furthering their understanding of effective mathematics instruction. In each session, participants do math together and use these experiences to investigate the development of mathematical thinking and to reflect on their own learning. Participants explore the essential elements of a constructivist mathematics classroom in which collaboration is core to building concepts and skills. Designing a classroom where deep mathematical understanding is the primary goal requires explorations of attitudes and beliefs as well as practices and expectations. This course addresses the moral imperative that all students are capable of learning math. It focuses on creating inclusive environments for learners with developmental variations. The course also focuses on creating mathematical experiences that support students for whom English is a new language. Participants discuss classroom management strategies for grouping and individualizing instruction.
EDUC563-1 The Teaching of Reading, Writing, and Language Arts in the Primary Grades 3 TBA Kim McLeveighn-Helper W 7:00-9:00 PM
This course examines the process through which reading and writing are acquired by young children, ages 4-8.  We study the ways teachers can support literacy growth for children’s diverse learning needs and styles, cultural and linguistic backgrounds, and socioeconomic status.  The course explores theoretical frameworks of literacy development as well as practical applications. Graduate students work directly with a child, who is an emergent reader and writer, to develop the skills of close observation, assessment, record keeping, and planning.  Graduate students, individually and as a group, analyze the contexts, activities and relationships that support children’s language and literacy learning in early childhood classrooms.
EDUC563-2 The Teaching of Reading, Writing, and Language Arts in the Primary Grades 3 TBA Mary Kruger TH 4:45-6:45 PM
This course examines the process through which reading and writing are acquired by young children, ages 4-8.  We study the ways teachers can support literacy growth for children’s diverse learning needs and styles, cultural and linguistic backgrounds, and socioeconomic status.  The course explores theoretical frameworks of literacy development as well as practical applications. Graduate students work directly with a child, who is an emergent reader and writer, to develop the skills of close observation, assessment, record keeping, and planning.  Graduate students, individually and as a group, analyze the contexts, activities and relationships that support children’s language and literacy learning in early childhood classrooms.
EDUC564-1 Language, Literature, and Emergent Literacy in the Primary Grades 3 TBA Staff TBD M 4:45-6:45 PM
This course examines the role of literature in children’s lives. Participants develop criteria for selecting literature for children, considering factors including but not limited to child development, aesthetics, language, and culture, as well as children’s interests and curiosities. Through active engagement with books, artifacts, and ideas, participants gain an understanding of the role of literature in language development in children’s primary and new languages. Participants will examine ways to use literature from a wide range of genres and perspectives for reading aloud, honoring and stimulating children’s storytelling, and for deepening learning across content areas.
EDUC568-1 Teaching Literacy in the Upper Elementary Grades 3 TBA Laurie Rabinowitz TH 7:00-9:00 PM
Participants learn how to support literacy growth for children’s diverse learning needs and styles, cultural and linguistic backgrounds, and socioeconomic status.  The course explores theoretical frameworks of literacy development as well as practical applications in reading, writing and word study lesson planning,  assessment, and record keeping.  Participants, individually and as a group, analyze the contexts, activities, and relationships that support language and literacy learning using a balanced literacy approach.
EDUC576-1 Writing in the Elementary Grades 2 TBA Lynne Einbender T 4:45-6:45 PM
In this course, participants examine the theories and practices of teaching writing, both as writers and as teachers. The goal of this dual focus is to develop meta-cognitive awareness of one’s own writing process to inform one’s teaching practice. Participants do this through discussing course texts, children’s literature, videos and children’s writing. The course explores: teaching children to select topics, draft, revise, edit and publish their own writing; designing writing curriculum that is inclusive and culturally responsive; using children’s literature to teach writing through concrete observation and inquiry; using writing conferences and assessments to guide curricular decisions; teaching writing mechanics using a constructivist approach; exploring a range of teaching methods and literature to accommodate diverse learners.
EDUC590-1 Arts Workshop for Teachers (Grades N - 6) 2 TBA Ann-Marie Mott M 4:45-6:45 PM Cancelled
This studio course stresses the relationship of expression in arts and crafts to aspects of teaching and learning in other areas. Students develop approaches for discovering the use and origins of materials as well as their role in the curriculum. The course helps teachers develop a basic art program in their classrooms. Studio experiences include painting, collage, clay work, printmaking, and such crafts as puppet making, dyeing, and weaving. Readings and class discussion deal with the development of art curricula using child development as a base. Students study children’s art through slides and children’s actual work.
EDUC590-2 Arts Workshop for Teachers (Grades N - 6) 2 TBA Maria Richa M 4:45-6:45 PM
This studio course stresses the relationship of expression in arts and crafts to aspects of teaching and learning in other areas. Students develop approaches for discovering the use and origins of materials as well as their role in the curriculum. The course helps teachers develop a basic art program in their classrooms. Studio experiences include painting, collage, clay work, printmaking, and such crafts as puppet making, dyeing, and weaving. Readings and class discussion deal with the development of art curricula using child development as a base. Students study children’s art through slides and children’s actual work.
EDUC591-1 Music and Movement: Multicultural and Developmental Approaches in Grades N - 6 2 TBA Staff TBD TH 4:45-6:45 PM
This course provides opportunities to experience key elements of music, sound, and movement through experiential, interactive learning grounded in neurocognitive, developmental, and critical multicultural perspectives. Participants will learn and share songs, rhythms, and games from diverse cultural and linguistic traditions and will draw on their own current and past experiences to reflect on the role of music and movement in children’s development. Through research and guided activities, participants will explore topics such as instrument-making from recyclable materials, world drumming, sound improvisation, and site-based choreography in order to develop strategies for integrating music and movement across the curriculum. The course will also explore a range of methodologies (e.g. Dalcroze Eurhythmics, Laban Movement Analysis, and Orff-Shülwerk) that support inclusive practices.
EDUC613-1 Understanding and Working with Families of Infants and Toddlers 2 TBA Yasmin Dorrian M 4:45-6:45 PM
This course helps students understand the psychological underpinnings of parenting across a range of families and contexts. Through class discussion, readings, videos, role play in class and guest speakers, students will develop an understanding of what is involved in working with significant adults in the lives of infants and toddlers. Graduate students will explore the connections among early relationships, brain development, health and later mental health.  A multilevel framework utilizes the concepts of containment and holding as a way to understand what parents must provide for their children and what adults must also provide for themselves in order to work effectively with families. Stages of parenting are looked at within the wider lens that incorporates variety among parents, as well as within the same parent at different times. Through practice with their own case material and readings on basic counseling techniques graduate students continue to develop a self- reflective ability that helps them think critically about their responses to families and learn when and how to provide guidance, towards the promotion of mental wellness and prevention of disruptions in development. The course will explore the roles of the teacher and the social worker.
EDUC651-1 Special Study: Strategies for Language and Concept Development 1 Online Carla España Sa 8:00 AM-4:00 PM Date: 10/23
This series promotes an in-depth discussion about language principles and methodology, with a focus on issues of language development and assessment.

This course has an asynchronous online component that will run from 10/24/21-11/30/21. Note: Students can earn elective credit as part of the Language Series. See details of the conference at: bankstreet.edu/ls

EDUC802-1 The World of Toddlers and Twos: The Second and Third Years of Life 3 TBA Staff TBD T 4:45-6:45 PM
This course offers a developmental-interactional view of toddlers and two-year-olds and their families. Participants will look at the ways children in this age period become more autonomous selves while simultaneously developing capacities for more elaborated and diverse relationships with others and their environments. The course will examine the interplay of the toddler’s physical maturation, interpersonal experiences, physical environments and cultures in development. Participants will also focus on the everyday implications of the growing toddler’s need for self-assertion and autonomy and the issues that adults face in parenting or working with this age group. Graduate students will study the science of brain development and its impact on all domains.  Although this is not a “how-to” course, graduate students will learn how to apply their knowledge of development in the second and third year to their practices with toddlers and two-year-olds. This course develops awareness and knowledge of infant mental health in development, dyadic relationships and systems. Prerequisite: EDUC 500.
Prerequisite for EDUC 802: EDUC 500 or EDUC 800
EDUC803-1 Developmental Variations 2 TBA Staff TBD T 7:00-9:00 PM
This course is designed to increase participants’ awareness and understanding of the educational, social, cultural, linguistic and developmental implications of disability from historical, legal, and socio-political perspectives. The course will critically examine state and federal special education and disability laws and regulations and their implementation across a range of settings including their intersection with issues of race, class, language and gender. There is an emphasis on understanding how disability is socially constructed at the levels of family, community, school, and the larger society.  Participants apply an understanding of developmental variations to analyze and create accessible learning experiences for children. Prerequisite: EDUC 500 or permission of instructor.
Prerequisite for EDUC803: EDUC 500 or EDUC 501 or EDUC 800 or permission of instructor
EDUC803-2 Developmental Variations 2 TBA Kristen Kaelin TH 4:45-6:45 PM
This course is designed to increase participants’ awareness and understanding of the educational, social, cultural, linguistic and developmental implications of disability from historical, legal, and socio-political perspectives. The course will critically examine state and federal special education and disability laws and regulations and their implementation across a range of settings including their intersection with issues of race, class, language and gender. There is an emphasis on understanding how disability is socially constructed at the levels of family, community, school, and the larger society.  Participants apply an understanding of developmental variations to analyze and create accessible learning experiences for children. Prerequisite: EDUC 500 or permission of instructor.
Prerequisite for EDUC803: EDUC 500 or EDUC 501 or EDUC 800 or permission of instructor
EDUC807-1 Teaching Children with Developmental Variations in Language and Communication 2 TBA Mimi Rosenberg T 7:00-9:00 PM
Building on theories of language development and learning, this course is designed to deepen graduate students’ understanding of language and communication disorders in monolingual and bilingual children. There is an exploration of the reciprocal relationship between children’s diverse communication abilities and styles and academic, social and emotional development. The importance of teacher collaboration with other service providers is highlighted. Graduate students will reflect on their own communication styles as a means of more effectively meeting the communication needs of their students. The concept of social construction of disability will help to frame issues of equity that can guide teachers in their roles as advocates for all children. Prerequisite: EDUC 505 or EDUC 561.
Prerequisite(s) for EDUC807: EDUC 505; or EDUC 561 and EDUC 870
EDUC808-1 The Study of Children in Diverse and Inclusive Educational Settings through Observation and Recording 3 TBA Jessica Charles T 7:00-9:00 PM
This course focuses on observation as a practice for more deeply understanding children through their interactions with people, experiences, and materials across a range of environments. Through a case study of one child, participants deepen their knowledge, skills, and dispositions for observing children. They learn to translate observations into descriptive, written data and analyze observational data to inform practice. Participants develop skills of reflection and analysis as they investigate how bias and perspective impact observation and one’s understanding of children. Participants integrate knowledge about variations in children’s social-emotional, cognitive, linguistic, motor, and language development. They consider multiple domains of children’s individual and socio-cultural identities including race, gender, culture, and language and the implications for constructing inclusive and culturally sustaining classroom environments and curricula. Prerequisite: EDUC 500 or permission of instructor.
Prerequisite for EDUC 808: EDUC 500 or EDUC 800 or permission of instructor
EDUC823-1 Play Techniques for Early Childhood Settings 1 TBA Deborah Vilas T 4:45-6:50 PM Dates: 9/14, 9/21, 9/28, 10/5, 10/12, 10/19
This course explores play as central to supporting the social, emotional, and cognitive development of children with varying developmental and learning variations.  Participants will learn a variety of therapeutic play techniques that promote self-regulation, self-esteem, and emotional expression, and development across domains. This course is appropriate for general and special education teachers, parents, caregivers, child life specialists, social workers, therapists and counselors. Participants are required to have prior coursework focused on child development and on developmental variations. Prerequisite: EDUC 803 or with permission of instructor.
Prerequisite for EDUC 823: EDUC 803.
EDUC860-1 Assessment and Instruction in Teaching Literacy to Children with Language and Learning Variations 3 TBA Jessica Higgins T 4:45-6:45 PM
This course integrates research, theory, and practice as participants learn about supporting literacy development for children with reading, writing, and language variations. Participants learn about the reading and writing processes within a developmental framework. The course explores the iterative relationship between assessment and intervention, and critically examines a range of methods and materials in use in the field. Participants apply their learning as they work over multiple sessions with a child. Prerequisite: EDUC 563 or EDUC 568.
Prerequisites for EDUC 860: EDUC 505; EDUC 563 or EDUC 568.
EDUC862-1 Assessment, Diagnosis, and Evaluation of Children with Developmental Variations 3 TBA Nilda Bayron-Resnick W 7:00-9:00 PM
This course is designed to explore a variety of approaches used for the diagnosis, planning, and evaluation of students with disabilities.  Participants will develop a critical understanding of the historical, legal and ethical considerations, appropriate use, mis-use, value, and limitations of standardized assessments including their intersection with issues of race, class, language and gender. Participants will administer and interpret various psycho-educational tests and develop instructional plans to meet the unique needs of children with oral language, reading, writing, and math challenges. Participants will broaden their abilities to incorporate information from diagnostic reports into their teaching.
EDUC867-1 The Teacher's Role in the Development of Reading Comprehension: Strategic Teaching (Grades K - 6) 1 TBA Mary Kruger TH 7:00-9:05 PM Dates: 9/9, 9/23, 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21
This course will enable teachers to extend their theoretical and practical understanding of the ways to support children’s reading comprehension in kindergarten through grade 6. Using theoretical frameworks, students will investigate comprehension skills and strategies by identifying and matching the demands of text with the multiple needs of fluent readers. Students will develop competencies in current literacy practices such as Interactive Read Aloud, Think Aloud, Guided Reading, and Questioning the Author. In addition, they will analyze the ways in which teaching reading comprehension strategies empowers children to be independent readers. Teachers will be able to use the strategies demonstrated in this course with all learners, including English Language Learners and children with special needs. Prerequisite: EDUC 563 or EDUC 567 or EDUC 568 or permission of instructor.
Prerequisite for EDUC867: EDUC 563 or EDUC 567 or EDUC 568 or permission of instructor
EDUC869-1 Supporting Early Language and Literacy for Children with Developmental Variations (birth-8) 2 TBA Soyoung Park TH 4:45-6:45 PM
This course examines communication, language, and literacy as they emerge in monolingual and multilingual children from infancy through early childhood. Participants examine how language, socialization, communicative competence, and literacy develop within, and are impacted by, children’s sociocultural contexts.  Participants are introduced to communication disorders and other learning variations of the early years that affect language and literacy learning.  Specific practices are identified to enhance the experience of young children who are receiving services in school as English language learners. Modifications and adaptations to support children with learning variations are explored. Prerequisite: EDUC 500; pre- or corequisite: EDUC 505.
Prerequisite for EDUC 869: EDUC 500 or EDUC 800; pre- or corequisite: EDUC 505
EDUC894-1 Early Childhood Practicum I: Observing a Child through Family/ Cultural Contexts 2 TBA Staff TBD M 7:00-9:00 PM
Early Childhood Practicum I and II is a year-long course that provides graduate students the opportunity to integrate theory and practice as they work with a child and family.  Practicum I focuses on: 1) observation as the foundation of early childhood assessment and 2) culturally sustaining, family-based practice. Participants learn to observe and record children’s behavior in home, school, and community settings. Through regular observations, participants construct a respectful and increasingly complex understanding of the child within his/her sociocultural context.  Special emphasis is placed on recognizing the strengths of the child and family.  Participants develop greater awareness of their own perspectives and the ways their personal experiences affect what they notice and how they interpret their observations. Participants begin to integrate adult development, family systems theory, and cultural/linguistic diversity as a basis for developing relationships with the child’s family. This work provides a foundation for Practicum II. Prerequisite: EDUC 803.
Prerequisites for EDUC 894: EDUC 500 or EDUC 800; EDUC 803.
EDUC894-2 Early Childhood Practicum I: Observing a Child through Family/ Cultural Contexts 2 TBA Rachel Leeper M 7:00-9:00 PM
Early Childhood Practicum I and II is a year-long course that provides graduate students the opportunity to integrate theory and practice as they work with a child and family.  Practicum I focuses on: 1) observation as the foundation of early childhood assessment and 2) culturally sustaining, family-based practice. Participants learn to observe and record children’s behavior in home, school, and community settings. Through regular observations, participants construct a respectful and increasingly complex understanding of the child within his/her sociocultural context.  Special emphasis is placed on recognizing the strengths of the child and family.  Participants develop greater awareness of their own perspectives and the ways their personal experiences affect what they notice and how they interpret their observations. Participants begin to integrate adult development, family systems theory, and cultural/linguistic diversity as a basis for developing relationships with the child’s family. This work provides a foundation for Practicum II. Prerequisite: EDUC 803.
Prerequisites for EDUC 894: EDUC 500 or EDUC 800; EDUC 803.
TESL530-1 Theoretical Foundations: Social, Cultural, and Linguistic Diversity in School 3 TBA Megan Purvis T 7:00-9:00 PM
This course explores how major federal and state laws, language policies, and theories of language development (first and second language acquisition, bilingualism, and translingualism) shape English as a new language (ENL) and bilingual program designs. Candidates will analyze how these programs serve diverse students in PreK-12 urban schools, with a special focus on the education of students who are immigrants, including students with limited or interrupted formal education (SLIFE). Candidates will explore immigration to the United States from a sociocultural perspective, investigate the factors that shape immigrant students’ experiences in schools, and how these impact their identity development. Graduate students will reflect on their own beliefs and perceptions about immigrants and emergent bilingual students while identifying the experiences that have contributed to these beliefs and perceptions. They will survey the demographic landscape of a school and evaluate how the school language allocation policy, curricula, and ENL & bilingual programs respond to the legal rights and the linguistic, socio-emotional and academic needs of emergent bilingual students. Based on their comprehensive analysis and principles of social justice, candidates will develop an advocacy plan to address identified needs of emergent bilingual students and their families.
TESL862-1 Assessment and Differentiation for Linguistically Diverse Students with Developmental Variations 3 TBA Nilda Bayron-Resnick M 4:45-6:45 PM
In this course, participants will review the history of special education as it has impacted students and families from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds, focusing on over-representation in the classifications of intellectual disability, emotional disability, and language/learning disabilities. This course will help English as a new language (ENL) teachers examine the intersection between disability and cultural and linguistic diversity. Participants will unpack assumptions about linguistically and culturally diverse families, and understand how various disabilities interact with learning a new language to better discern typical patterns of language development from language-based disabilities. Participants will have the opportunity to become familiar with formal and informal assessments used to evaluate K-12 students and how these apply to emergent bilingual speakers, as well as concepts including validity, reliability, and basic statistical terminology.  Participants will collaborate with school professionals to explore strategies for working effectively with families of linguistically and culturally diverse children and adolescents.

Fieldwork/Student Teaching/Advisement Courses

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
EDUC930-1 Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 6 TBA Staff TBD W 4:45-6:45 PM
Fieldwork in appropriate settings with supervision and advisement. Candidates in advisement participate in weekly small-group conferences with their advisor. These seminars include the exchange and analysis of ongoing professional experiences and provide a forum for integrating theory with practice. Participants will develop their capacity to construct learning environments and communities that support the development of infants, children, and/or adolescents, depending on the focus of their program. Opportunities to collaborate and co-teach with cooperating teachers and other setting personnel are an integral part of the course. This is part one of two semesters of supervised fieldwork. The second part is EDUC931.

This course is part one of two semesters of fieldwork. The second part is EDUC931.

EDUC932-1 Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 3 TBA Staff TBD W 4:45-6:45 PM
Fieldwork in appropriate settings with supervision and advisement. Candidates in advisement participate in small-group conferences with their advisor. These seminars include the exchange and analysis of ongoing professional experiences and provide a forum for integrating theory with practice. Participants will develop their capacity to construct learning environments and communities that support the development of infants, children, and/or adolescents, depending on the focus of their program. Opportunities to collaborate and co-teach with cooperating teachers and other school personnel are an integral part of the course. This course is taken over two consecutive semesters.

This course is part one of two semesters of fieldwork. The second part is EDUC934.

EDUC937-1 Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 6 TBA Staff TBD W 4:45-6:45 PM
Fieldwork in appropriate settings with supervision and advisement. Candidates in advisement participate in weekly small-group conferences with their advisor. These seminars include the exchange and analysis of ongoing professional experiences and provide a forum for integrating theory with practice. Participants will develop their capacity to construct learning environments and communities that support the development of infants, children, and/or adolescents, depending on the focus of their program. Opportunities to collaborate and co-teach with cooperating teachers and other setting personnel are an integral part of the course. This course is for one semester only.
This course is for students needing only one semester of supervised fieldwork. Formerly EDUC931.
EDUC943-1 Teaching Literacy Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 6 TBA Staff TBD W 4:45-6:45 PM
Fieldwork in an appropriate setting with supervision and advisement. Students in advisement participate in weekly small-group conferences with their advisor. These seminars include the exchange and analysis of ongoing professional experiences and provide a forum for integrating theory and practice. Attention is given to instructional strategies for addressing the individual academic and behavioral needs of typically and atypically developing children within classroom settings. Opportunities to collaborate and coteach with cooperating teachers and other school personnel are an integral part of the course. Pre- or co-requisite: EDUC 860.

This course is part one of two semesters of fieldwork. The second part is EDUC944.

Integrative Master's Project - Independent Study Option

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
IS500-1 Independent Study 0 N/A Staff TBD See mentor
The Independent Study is an original work that you initiate, often growing out of a meaningful course assignment or an idea, question, or experience rooted in a fieldwork or work setting. Students work with a faculty mentor who has expertise in the particular area of study. The Independent Study usually includes two semesters of research and writing, and is most closely aligned with a traditional master’s thesis. Independent Studies are made accessible to the public though the Bank Street Library's online catalogue.

Students should register only at the beginning of their Independent Study. Students continuing an Independent Study from a previous semester should contact the Registrar's Office before registering.

Registration is not allowed after September 20, 2021.

IMPORTANT NOTE TO STUDENTS REGISTERING FOR INDEPENDENT STUDIES In order to register for Independent Studies (IS500) you must have already secured a faculty mentor who has reviewed your IS proposal and has committed to serve as your IS mentor. By registering for the IS500, you are attesting to having secured a mentor, and you are agreeing to follow all applicable IS directives and guidelines as stated in A Guide to the Integrative Master’s Project.

In addition to registering through my.BSC for IS500, please fill out the Independent Study Mentor Form, indicating which faculty member has consented to mentor you.

Please note: Students who register without completing the above form will be dropped by the Registrar's Office from their Independent Study. You must identify your mentor in order to be enrolled in an Independent Study for the term.

Integrative Master's Project-Semester-Based IMP Options

Note: These are a Semester-Based IMP Options. Student work must be completed and submitted by the end of one semester. Students who do not complete their work by the end of the semester will be required to re-register and pay for another IMP option in the future. Please read the dates in the schedule carefully, and be sure to register on time and attend all sessions.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
IMP2-1 Collaborative Student Faculty Inquiry 0 TBA Stan Chu, Deborah Kurtzberg M 4:45-6:45 PM Dates: 9/13, 10/4, 11/8, 12/6
The Collaborative Student-Faculty Inquiry is a one-semester small peer group option focused on a specific topic or issue. These topics, based on professional interests faculty would like to explore along with students, are posted each fall and spring. You identify a particular aspect of the topic or issue to investigate and, with your peers, determine a format in which to coordinate and present the findings. Students present their projects in mid-January or the week of graduation in May.

Title: Bringing Our Students Out into the World: Integrating Outdoor Investigations into the Early Childhood and Elementary Curriculum

The outdoors provides a rich learning environment for children, whether you are in an urban, suburban or rural area. Outdoor investigations can encompass one’s own school block, a nearby park, walking trips in the neighborhood or travels to other neighborhoods exhibiting diverse characteristics. The goal of this IMP is to explore ways to infuse the accessible world outside of the classroom into the early childhood or elementary curriculum and to develop resources to implement investigative opportunities using the outdoors.

Contact the facilitator/instructor if there are questions about a specific inquiry. Registration is not allowed after the class has met.

IMP2-2 Collaborative Student Faculty Inquiry 0 Online Sean O'Shea M 4:45-6:45 PM Dates: 9/13, 10/4, 11/15, 12/13
The Collaborative Student-Faculty Inquiry is a one-semester small peer group option focused on a specific topic or issue. These topics, based on professional interests faculty would like to explore along with students, are posted each fall and spring. You identify a particular aspect of the topic or issue to investigate and, with your peers, determine a format in which to coordinate and present the findings. Students present their projects in mid-January or the week of graduation in May.

Title: Topics in Behavior for Classroom and School Communities

Behavior frequently appears high on the shortlist of teacher concerns regarding their practice. There are multiple reasons for the presence of challenging behavior in classrooms. Participants in this Inquiry will have the opportunity to research strategies that will support the acquisition of skills that students and teachers can use to enrich their interactions in the environments that they share.

Contact the facilitator/instructor if there are questions about a specific inquiry. Registration is not allowed after the class has met.

IMP2-3 Collaborative Student Faculty Inquiry 0 Online Gil Schmerler M 7:00-9:00 PM Dates: 9/20, 10/18, 11/15, 12/13
The Collaborative Student-Faculty Inquiry is a one-semester small peer group option focused on a specific topic or issue. These topics, based on professional interests faculty would like to explore along with students, are posted each fall and spring. You identify a particular aspect of the topic or issue to investigate and, with your peers, determine a format in which to coordinate and present the findings. Students present their projects in mid-January or the week of graduation in May.

Title: Teacher Leadership

Bank Street-educated teachers are invariably called on for leadership in their schools, yet their preparation programs do not often have room for learning to promote collaboration, peer coaching, and advocacy. This collaborative inquiry provides the opportunity for students to investigate and practice the skills to become teacher leaders and, in general, to inspire, support, and coach their colleagues in improving instructional practice and creating stronger cultures in their workplaces. Participants typically create case studies and/or descriptive analyses of teacher leadership in their own school sites (or, alternatively, a school to which they have ready access).

Contact the facilitator/instructor if there are questions about a specific inquiry. Registration is not allowed after the class has met.

IMP2-4 Collaborative Student Faculty Inquiry 0 TBA Carmen Colón, Troy Pinkney T 4:45-6:45 PM Dates: 9/21, 10/19, 11/16, 12/14
The Collaborative Student-Faculty Inquiry is a one-semester small peer group option focused on a specific topic or issue. These topics, based on professional interests faculty would like to explore along with students, are posted each fall and spring. You identify a particular aspect of the topic or issue to investigate and, with your peers, determine a format in which to coordinate and present the findings. Students present their projects in mid-January or the week of graduation in May.

Title: Centering the strength of Black and Brown children in schools

Students will explore with an inquisitive mind how children of color experience “race” in their classroom and how “race” impacts their learning and classroom experience. Through this Student/Faculty Inquiry, students will explore current practices in their school and develop strategies to break down barriers and preconceived notions about the presence of black and brown children in educational spaces and learning communities. Students will develop 1 lesson plan, for the beginning phase, developing/middle phase, and culminating phase for their inquiry. Lessons/ experiences should build on one another to support the racial development of all children in the classroom with an eye towards cultivating and celebrating the strength of children of color, centering joy.

Contact the facilitator/instructor if there are questions about a specific inquiry. Registration is not allowed after the class has met.

IMP2-6 Collaborative Student Faculty Inquiry 0 Online Mary Kruger, Susan Rolander W 7:00-9:00 PM Dates: 9/22, 10/13, 11/10, 12/8
The Collaborative Student-Faculty Inquiry is a one-semester small peer group option focused on a specific topic or issue. These topics, based on professional interests faculty would like to explore along with students, are posted each fall and spring. You identify a particular aspect of the topic or issue to investigate and, with your peers, determine a format in which to coordinate and present the findings. Students present their projects in mid-January or the week of graduation in May.

Title: Children's Literature in the Elementary Classroom

For this Integrative Master’s Project, each participant will select a grouping of children’s literature and craft a curriculum experience that integrates that grouping. Projects will focus on a specific age group, such as second grade or 7/8s. Participants will write a rationale for why they have chosen this area of the curriculum to focus on and will describe how the project supports the creation of a learning environment that sustains children's cultural, linguistic, and racial identities as well as the developmental characteristics of the focal children. Participants will provide an annotated bibliography of children's books in the area of interest, as well as a few appropriate professional texts. Each project will describe the specific curricular context. The completed IMP will demonstrate the ability of the participant to competently express through written language the creation of a curriculum experience grounded in children’s literature that integrates their knowledge of child development, literature, content, anti-bias approaches to curriculum, and assessment. Areas of focus may include separation, going to the hospital, a math concept, language, community study, exploration of race and identity, etc.

Contact the facilitator/instructor if there are questions about a specific inquiry. Registration is not allowed after the class has met.

Students may attend in-person or remotely.

IMP2-7 Collaborative Student Faculty Inquiry 0 TBA Margaret Blachly TH 4:45-6:45 PM Dates: 9/23, 10/14, 11/18, 12/9
The Collaborative Student-Faculty Inquiry is a one-semester small peer group option focused on a specific topic or issue. These topics, based on professional interests faculty would like to explore along with students, are posted each fall and spring. You identify a particular aspect of the topic or issue to investigate and, with your peers, determine a format in which to coordinate and present the findings. Students present their projects in mid-January or the week of graduation in May.

Title: Using Emotionally Responsive Practice Techniques in the Classroom

This faculty-led Group Inquiry IMP introduces the core concepts and techniques of Emotionally Responsive Practice. The group meetings will familiarize students to practice identifying unresolved developmental issues, use of Story Gathering process, use of transitional objects in classrooms, and emotionally responsive literacy process in preschool and elementary school classrooms. Students will design ways to apply these concepts in their own settings, and receive guidance and feedback from the instructor(s). Final project will include creating a resource binder of readings, techniques and lesson plans, as well as detailed documentation of the ERP technique(s) applied in the setting, and a reflection on the children's response to the technique(s). Each student will have one to three personal sessions with the facilitators in addition to the scheduled group meeting times.

Contact the facilitator/instructor if there are questions about a specific inquiry. Registration is not allowed after the class has met.

IMP2-8 Collaborative Student Faculty Inquiry 0 Online Abigail Kerlin TH 4:45-6:45 PM Dates: 9/9, 10/7, 11/4, 12/2
The Collaborative Student-Faculty Inquiry is a one-semester small peer group option focused on a specific topic or issue. These topics, based on professional interests faculty would like to explore along with students, are posted each fall and spring. You identify a particular aspect of the topic or issue to investigate and, with your peers, determine a format in which to coordinate and present the findings. Students present their projects in mid-January or the week of graduation in May.

Title: Merging the lenses of Geography and Social Justice.

The study of geography provides a window into the human world. Geography inquiry can help children to explore the influence of environments on society and society's impact on environments. During this collaborative faculty inquiry students will have the opportunity to investigate the varied and dynamic ways that a study of geography can develop a social justice orientation in children and teachers (examples may include but are not limited to, mapping experiences, research into the distribution of resources, or a close look at rezoning initiatives.

Contact the facilitator/instructor if there are questions about a specific inquiry. Registration is not allowed after the class has met.

IMP2-9 Collaborative Student Faculty Inquiry 0 TBA Mary Kruger TH 7:00-9:00 PM Dates: 9/23, 10/14, 11/11, 12/9
The Collaborative Student-Faculty Inquiry is a one-semester small peer group option focused on a specific topic or issue. These topics, based on professional interests faculty would like to explore along with students, are posted each fall and spring. You identify a particular aspect of the topic or issue to investigate and, with your peers, determine a format in which to coordinate and present the findings. Students present their projects in mid-January or the week of graduation in May.

Title: Crafting a Purposeful Picture Book

Within the field of children's literature, there still remain gaps: gaps in representation, gaps in storylines, gaps in content areas, and gaps in books with formats that young readers need. This IMP option is for those interested in filling one of these gaps and creating a picture book that is purposeful to a particular age group. Knowing that words and images work together, in a multitude of ways, the final book idea will have content reflecting both art and language. Any genre is possible. Parts of an accompanying paper include: rationale (what brought you to this project), a section on child development, an exploration of children's books that serve as mentors for you as writer, written feedback from a reading of your book with a group of children, and a reflective conclusion on your IMP process.

Contact the facilitator/instructor if there are questions about a specific inquiry. Registration is not allowed after the class has met.

Students may attend in-person or remotely.

IMP3-1 Mentored Directed Essay 0 N/A Staff TBD See advisor
Students choosing to do a Mentored Directed Essay work with an assigned faculty mentor to design an essay that is based on existing, program-specific prepared questions. These questions are designed to help you think and write about the salient issues pertaining to your chosen area of study. Working with your mentor, you may adapt questions to support the distinctive needs of your professional growth, interests, and current work situation. This option is designed to provide structure and focus with maximum flexibility, and is intended to be completed within a single semester. This option is offered all semesters.

Students should register for section 01. In September, students will be assigned their particular mentor. Registration is not allowed after September 20, 2021, and it is recommended that students register as early as possible to allow themselves the maximum amount of time to work on their essay questions. Students who register on September 20 will still be required to turn in their completed essay questions to their mentor by the last day of the term.

Child Life

Courses within this program are for Child Life students only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
EDUC500D-1 Child Development 3 Online Troy Pinkney TH 7:00-9:00 PM
In this course we will examine the interactions among the cognitive, social, emotional, linguistic, and physical development of children from infancy into adolescence. We will pay close attention to children as makers of meaning in the contexts of their development, including family, school, socioeconomic class, and culture. Through reading classic and current literature, we will attend to some of the larger questions about development, such as the relationship between nature and nurture, the role of developmental theory, and the tension between the search for developmental universals and the reality of individual differences. The goal is to make developmental theory vibrant and meaningful so that the generalized theoretical child comes to enhance and inform how one understands individual children.

Note: This course will be fully online. Synchronous sessions to be held on 9/9, 10/7, 11/11, and 12/16, all other sessions are asynchronous. This section is for Child Life students only.

EDUC821-1 Child Life in the Healthcare Setting: A Family-Centered Care Approach 3 Online Genevieve Lowry T 7:00-9:00 PM
This course provides an overview of the child life profession. It examines research and theory that inform family-centered clinical practice and programming for infants, children, adolescents, and emerging adults in healthcare and community settings. Participants will examine child life competencies, principles, and responsibilities, as developed by the Association of Child Life Professionals. Participants will consider access and equity issues as they relate to assessment, interventions, and practical strategies designed to support children and families facing acute and chronic illness and health conditions. Pre- or corequisite: EDUC 500.

Note: This course will be fully online. Synchronous sessions to be held on 9/14 and 12/14, all other sessions are asynchronous. This section is for Child Life students only.

Pre- or co-requisite for EDUC821: EDUC 500.
EDUC822-1 Children with Special Healthcare Needs: In the Hospital, at Home, and in School 3 Online Deborah Vilas, Hilary Woodward T 7:00-9:00 PM
This course will explore the personal, educational, social, and familial dimensions of childhood health conditions, including a focus on the educational law and how it applies to children with special healthcare needs. Children with severe and chronic illness often spend more time in school and at home than in the hospital. We will address the impact of these transitions on cognitive, social, and emotional development through the use of vignettes. This course will address the ways in which workers in the healthcare, school, and community settings can help the children, their families, and their peers adapt successfully to the stressors they all encounter. Prerequisites: EDUC 500 and EDUC 821.

Note: This course will be fully online. Synchronous sessions to be held on 9/28 and 12/14, all other sessions are asynchronous. This section is for Child Life students only.

Prerequisite(s) for EDUC822: EDUC 500 and EDUC 821 or permission of instructor
EDUC826-1 Medical Aspects of Illness: A Child Life Perspective 3 Online Ria Hawks, Genevieve Lowry M 7:00-9:00 PM
This course provides students with an understanding of the development of a wide range of medical conditions which most frequently affect children and youth. Fundamental to understanding disability and illness is the necessity of having knowledge about the physical, neurological, and chemical roots of medical conditions which are alternately congenital, acquired, or genetic in their origin. Students will be introduced to research findings and standard practices of medical interventions and preparations for conditions highlighted in the course. Pre- or corequisite: EDUC 500.

Note: This course will be fully online. Synchronous sessions to be held on 9/13 and 12/20, all other sessions are asynchronous. This section is for Child Life students only.

Pre- or co-requisite for EDUC826: EDUC 500.
EDUC830-1 Research for Child Life Specialists 3 Online Sarah Daniels TH 7:00-9:00 PM
This course is designed to support child life practitioners in being effective generators and consumers of research.  In a changing health-care environment, research provides a  foundation for child life services,  validation of the therapeutic benefits of play and preparation, and justifies the continued development and support of child life programming provided by Certified Child Life Specialists. Participants will learn how to do action research using an inquiry-based approach. Participants will learn how to ask and analyze critical questions of practice grounded in a theoretical framework. Participants will gather and analyze data as a tool for making changes to child life practice and programming by learning to examine bias, perspective, and assumptions when conducting research and using findings. Prerequisite: EDUC 500.

Note: This course will be fully online. Synchronous sessions to be held on 9/9 and 12/16, all other sessions are asynchronous. This section is for Child Life students only.

Prerequisite for EDUC 830: EDUC 500
EDUC950-1 Clinical Experiences and Supervised Fieldwork: Children in Healthcare Settings 6 Online Staff TBD W 7:00-9:00 PM
Fieldwork in an approved child life internship with supervision and advisement. Graduate students participate in weekly small-group conferences with their advisor. These seminars include the exchange and analysis of ongoing professional experiences and provide a forum for integrating theory and practice. Attention is given to developing child life practice that supports the psychosocial and emotional needs of children, adolescents, and families. Graduate students examine and practice strategies for supporting the individual strengths and challenges of a broad range of children and adolescents within medical settings. Opportunities to collaborate with interdisciplinary members of the healthcare team are an integral part of the experience. Graduate students are responsible for securing their own hospital internships.

Note: This will be fully online. All sessions are synchronous.

Childhood General and Special Education Online Program

These courses are only for students enrolled in a fully online degree program.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
EDUC500R-1 Child Development 3 Online Jennifer Costa M 7:00-9:00 PM
In this course we will examine the interactions among the cognitive, social, emotional, linguistic, and physical development of children from infancy into adolescence. We will pay close attention to children as makers of meaning in the contexts of their development, including family, school, socioeconomic class, and culture. Through reading classic and current literature, we will attend to some of the larger questions about development, such as the relationship between nature and nurture, the role of developmental theory, and the tension between the search for developmental universals and the reality of individual differences. The goal is to make developmental theory vibrant and meaningful so that the generalized theoretical child comes to enhance and inform how one understands individual children.

This course is only for students enrolled in a fully online degree program. This course will meet synchronously on some of these dates. Alternative dates will be used for small group or individual meetings.

EDUC505R-1 Language Acquisition and Learning in a Linguistically Diverse Society 2 Online Luisa Costa W 7:00-9:00 PM
Based on the belief that language is an essential foundation for learning, this course addresses the typical processes of language acquisition in mono- and multilingual learners. Participants will examine theories of language acquisition and the role that caregivers and educators play in the development of language. In addition, participants will analyze historical, political, educational, social, and emotional factors that influence the socially constructed hierarchies of language varieties. A significant part of the course will be devoted to students who learn English as an additional language. Participants will learn how to use assessment of mono- and multilingual learners to identify appropriate instructional practices for social and academic language use in a range of educational settings. Course participants will also learn about ways of collaborating with families, colleagues, specialists, administrators, and interpreters. This course is for students in the Online Early Childhood and Childhood Programs only. Permission of the Director is needed for all other students.

This course is only for students enrolled in a fully online degree program. This course will meet synchronously on some of these dates. Alternative dates will be used for small group or individual meetings.

EDUC540R-1 Mathematics for Teachers in Diverse and Inclusive Educational Settings (Grades N – 6) 2 Online Helen Spruill T 7:00-9:00 PM
This course provides participants with an overview of mathematics learning for children grades N-6. Participants deepen their own mathematical knowledge while furthering their understanding of effective mathematics instruction. In each session, participants do math together and use these experiences to investigate the development of mathematical thinking and to reflect on their own learning. Participants explore the essential elements of a constructivist mathematics classroom in which collaboration is core to building concepts and skills. Designing a classroom where deep mathematical understanding is the primary goal requires explorations of attitudes and beliefs as well as practices and expectations. This course addresses the moral imperative that all students are capable of learning math. It focuses on creating inclusive environments for learners with developmental variations. The course also focuses on creating mathematical experiences that support students for whom English is a new language. Participants discuss classroom management strategies for grouping and individualizing instruction.

This course is only for students enrolled in a fully online degree program. This course will meet synchronously on some of these dates. Alternative dates will be used for small group or individual meetings.

EDUC605R-1 Designing and Managing Classroom Environments in Inclusive and Special Education Settings 3 Online Joselina Tejada TH 7:00-9:00 PM
This course is designed to help participants create classroom environments that will meet the needs of all children, including those with developmental variations. Addressing the concerns of both general and special education teachers, it incorporates presentations, role-playing, discussions, analyses of multimedia content, and informal diagnostic procedures. Participants examine the complexities of teachers’ day-to-day responsibilities and concerns, including classroom design, varied approaches to behavioral intervention, and the interplay among curricula, rules, expectations, routines, procedures, and children’s behavior.

This course is only for students enrolled in a fully online degree program. This course will meet synchronously on some of these dates. Alternative dates will be used for small group or individual meetings.

EDUC807R-1 Teaching Children with Developmental Variations in Language and Communication 2 Online Staff TBD T 7:00-9:00 PM
Building on theories of language development and learning, this course is designed to deepen graduate students’ understanding of language and communication disorders in monolingual and bilingual children. There is an exploration of the reciprocal relationship between children’s diverse communication abilities and styles and academic, social and emotional development. The importance of teacher collaboration with other service providers is highlighted. Graduate students will reflect on their own communication styles as a means of more effectively meeting the communication needs of their students. The concept of social construction of disability will help to frame issues of equity that can guide teachers in their roles as advocates for all children. Prerequisite: EDUC 505 or EDUC 561.

This course is only for students enrolled in a fully online degree program. This course will meet synchronously on some of these dates. Alternative dates will be used for small group or individual meetings.

EDUC860R-1 Assessment and Instruction in Teaching Literacy to Children with Language and Learning Variations 3 Online Laurie Rabinowitz M 7:00-9:00 PM
This course integrates research, theory, and practice as participants learn about supporting literacy development for children with reading, writing, and language variations. Participants learn about the reading and writing processes within a developmental framework. The course explores the iterative relationship between assessment and intervention, and critically examines a range of methods and materials in use in the field. Participants apply their learning as they work over multiple sessions with a child. Prerequisite: EDUC 563 or EDUC 568.

This course is only for students enrolled in a fully online degree program. This course will meet synchronously on some of these dates. Alternative dates will be used for small group or individual meetings.

EDUC930R-1 Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 6 Online Staff TBD W 7:00-9:00 PM
Fieldwork in appropriate settings with supervision and advisement. Candidates in advisement participate in weekly small-group conferences with their advisor. These seminars include the exchange and analysis of ongoing professional experiences and provide a forum for integrating theory with practice. Participants will develop their capacity to construct learning environments and communities that support the development of infants, children, and/or adolescents, depending on the focus of their program. Opportunities to collaborate and co-teach with cooperating teachers and other setting personnel are an integral part of the course. This is part one of two semesters of supervised fieldwork. The second part is EDUC931R.

This course is part one of two semesters of fieldwork. The second part is EDUC931R. Courses within this program are for online students only.

EDUC937R-1 Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 6 Online Staff TBD W 4:45-6:45 PM
Fieldwork in appropriate settings with supervision and advisement. Candidates in advisement participate in weekly small-group conferences with their advisor. These seminars include the exchange and analysis of ongoing professional experiences and provide a forum for integrating theory with practice. Participants will develop their capacity to construct learning environments and communities that support the development of infants, children, and/or adolescents, depending on the focus of their program. Opportunities to collaborate and co-teach with cooperating teachers and other setting personnel are an integral part of the course. This course is for one semester only.
This course is for students needing only one semester of supervised fieldwork. Formerly EDUC931R.

Early Childhood General and Special Education Online Program

These courses are only for students enrolled in a fully online degree program.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
EDUC500R-1 Child Development 3 Online Jennifer Costa M 7:00-9:00 PM
In this course we will examine the interactions among the cognitive, social, emotional, linguistic, and physical development of children from infancy into adolescence. We will pay close attention to children as makers of meaning in the contexts of their development, including family, school, socioeconomic class, and culture. Through reading classic and current literature, we will attend to some of the larger questions about development, such as the relationship between nature and nurture, the role of developmental theory, and the tension between the search for developmental universals and the reality of individual differences. The goal is to make developmental theory vibrant and meaningful so that the generalized theoretical child comes to enhance and inform how one understands individual children.

This course is only for students enrolled in a fully online degree program. This course will meet synchronously on some of these dates. Alternative dates will be used for small group or individual meetings.

EDUC505R-1 Language Acquisition and Learning in a Linguistically Diverse Society 2 Online Luisa Costa W 7:00-9:00 PM
Based on the belief that language is an essential foundation for learning, this course addresses the typical processes of language acquisition in mono- and multilingual learners. Participants will examine theories of language acquisition and the role that caregivers and educators play in the development of language. In addition, participants will analyze historical, political, educational, social, and emotional factors that influence the socially constructed hierarchies of language varieties. A significant part of the course will be devoted to students who learn English as an additional language. Participants will learn how to use assessment of mono- and multilingual learners to identify appropriate instructional practices for social and academic language use in a range of educational settings. Course participants will also learn about ways of collaborating with families, colleagues, specialists, administrators, and interpreters. This course is for students in the Online Early Childhood and Childhood Programs only. Permission of the Director is needed for all other students.

This course is only for students enrolled in a fully online degree program. This course will meet synchronously on some of these dates. Alternative dates will be used for small group or individual meetings.

EDUC535R-1 Science for Teachers (Grades N – 6) 2 Online Stan Chu TH 7:00-9:00 PM
Science for Teachers focuses on developing a science way of thinking and doing in PreK-6th grade classrooms. Each session deepens an understanding that doing science requires direct sensory encounters with the physical world. By experiencing first-hand investigations of physical and biological materials and related phenomena, participants create a range of representations that can uncover existing patterns and concepts. Discussions, readings, and reflective writings deepen and broaden work done with physical materials. Participants will reflect on their own learning as they work to construct meaningful science experiences that respond to the developmental levels of their students and affirm students’ cultural, linguistic, and learning diversity. The course explores evidence-based ways of making sense of the world that support the integration of science inquiry across the curriculum.

This course is only for students enrolled in a fully online degree program. This course will meet synchronously on some of these dates. Alternative dates will be used for small group or individual meetings.

EDUC563R-1 The Teaching of Reading, Writing, and Language Arts in the Primary Grades 3 Online Susan Rolander M 7:00-9:00 PM
This course examines the process through which reading and writing are acquired by young children, ages 4-8.  We study the ways teachers can support literacy growth for children’s diverse learning needs and styles, cultural and linguistic backgrounds, and socioeconomic status.  The course explores theoretical frameworks of literacy development as well as practical applications. Graduate students work directly with a child, who is an emergent reader and writer, to develop the skills of close observation, assessment, record keeping, and planning.  Graduate students, individually and as a group, analyze the contexts, activities and relationships that support children’s language and literacy learning in early childhood classrooms.

This course is only for students enrolled in a fully online degree program. This course will meet synchronously on some of these dates. Alternative dates will be used for small group or individual meetings.

EDUC823R-1 Play Techniques for Early Childhood Settings 1 Online Deborah Vilas M 7:00-9:00 PM
This course explores play as central to supporting the social, emotional, and cognitive development of children with varying developmental and learning variations.  Participants will learn a variety of therapeutic play techniques that promote self-regulation, self-esteem, and emotional expression, and development across domains. This course is appropriate for general and special education teachers, parents, caregivers, child life specialists, social workers, therapists and counselors. Participants are required to have prior coursework focused on child development and on developmental variations. Prerequisite: EDUC 803 or with permission of instructor.

This course is only for students enrolled in a fully online degree program. This course will meet synchronously on some of these dates. Alternative dates will be used for small group or individual meetings.

EDUC869R-1 Supporting Early Language and Literacy for Children with Developmental Variations (Birth-8) 2 Online Arelis Javier TH 7:00-9:00 PM
This course examines communication, language, and literacy as they emerge in monolingual and multilingual children from infancy through early childhood. Participants examine how language, socialization, communicative competence, and literacy develop within, and are impacted by, children’s sociocultural contexts.  Participants are introduced to communication disorders and other learning variations of the early years that affect language and literacy learning.  Specific practices are identified to enhance the experience of young children who are receiving services in school as English language learners. Modifications and adaptations to support children with learning variations are explored. Prerequisite: EDUC 500; pre- or corequisite: EDUC 505.

This course is only for students enrolled in a fully online degree program. This course will meet synchronously on some of these dates. Alternative dates will be used for small group or individual meetings.

EDUC894R-1 Early Childhood Practicum I: Observing a Child through Family/Cultural Contexts 2 Online Soyoung Park T 7:00-9:00 PM
Early Childhood Practicum I and II is a year-long course that provides graduate students the opportunity to integrate theory and practice as they work with a child and family.  Practicum I focuses on: 1) observation as the foundation of early childhood assessment and 2) culturally sustaining, family-based practice. Participants learn to observe and record children’s behavior in home, school, and community settings. Through regular observations, participants construct a respectful and increasingly complex understanding of the child within his/her sociocultural context.  Special emphasis is placed on recognizing the strengths of the child and family.  Participants develop greater awareness of their own perspectives and the ways their personal experiences affect what they notice and how they interpret their observations. Participants begin to integrate adult development, family systems theory, and cultural/linguistic diversity as a basis for developing relationships with the child’s family. This work provides a foundation for Practicum II. Prerequisite: EDUC 803.

This course is only for students enrolled in a fully online degree program. This course will meet synchronously on some of these dates. Alternative dates will be used for small group or individual meetings.

EDUC930R-1 Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 6 Online Staff TBD W 7:00-9:00 PM
Fieldwork in appropriate settings with supervision and advisement. Candidates in advisement participate in weekly small-group conferences with their advisor. These seminars include the exchange and analysis of ongoing professional experiences and provide a forum for integrating theory with practice. Participants will develop their capacity to construct learning environments and communities that support the development of infants, children, and/or adolescents, depending on the focus of their program. Opportunities to collaborate and co-teach with cooperating teachers and other setting personnel are an integral part of the course. This is part one of two semesters of supervised fieldwork. The second part is EDUC931R.

This course is part one of two semesters of fieldwork. The second part is EDUC931R. Courses within this program are for online students only.

EDUC937R-1 Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 6 Online Staff TBD W 4:45-6:45 PM
Fieldwork in appropriate settings with supervision and advisement. Candidates in advisement participate in weekly small-group conferences with their advisor. These seminars include the exchange and analysis of ongoing professional experiences and provide a forum for integrating theory with practice. Participants will develop their capacity to construct learning environments and communities that support the development of infants, children, and/or adolescents, depending on the focus of their program. Opportunities to collaborate and co-teach with cooperating teachers and other setting personnel are an integral part of the course. This course is for one semester only.
This course is for students needing only one semester of supervised fieldwork. Formerly EDUC931R.

Early Childhood Urban Education Initiative

These courses are for students in the Urban Ed Cohort only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
EDUC510-1 Curriculum in Early Childhood Education (Grades N - 3) 3 TBA Abigail Kerlin M 5:00-7:00 PM
This course engages participants in understanding curriculum as the development of experiences and environments across the school day that support all domains of children’s development including social, emotional, and cognitive. Participants study how children come to learn about themselves, others, and the world through rich interactions with people, environments, and materials. The course focuses on social studies as the core of the early childhood classroom, using children’s lived experiences within families, neighborhoods, and communities as the central content for exploration. Social studies is a vehicle for a deeper understanding of self and others towards the goal of creating more just and democratic communities. Participants apply their learning as they develop interdisciplinary curriculum grounded in their observations of children’s identities and curiosities as well as their development. Participants consider how to advocate for a progressive approach to curriculum across a range of contexts and with a diverse range of learners.

This section is only for students in the Urban Ed cohort.

EDUC590B-1 Arts Workshop for Teachers (Grades N – 6) 2 TBA Ann-Marie Mott W 5:00-7:00 PM
This studio course stresses the relationship of expression in arts and crafts to aspects of teaching and learning in other areas. Students develop approaches for discovering the use and origins of materials as well as their role in the curriculum. The course helps teachers develop a basic art program in their classrooms. Studio experiences include painting, collage, clay work, printmaking, and such crafts as puppet making, dyeing, and weaving. Readings and class discussion deal with the development of art curricula using child development as a base. Students study children’s art through slides and children’s actual work.

This section is only for students in the Urban Ed cohort.

Early Childhood General Education Advanced Standing

These courses are for students in the Early Childhood General Education Advanced Standing program only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
EDUC564A-1 Language, Literature, and Emergent Literacy in the Primary Grades 3 TBA Wendy Pollock M 5:00-7:00 PM
This course examines the role of literature in children’s lives. Participants develop criteria for selecting literature for children, considering factors including but not limited to child development, aesthetics, language, and culture, as well as children’s interests and curiosities. Through active engagement with books, artifacts, and ideas, participants gain an understanding of the role of literature in language development in children’s primary and new languages. Participants will examine ways to use literature from a wide range of genres and perspectives for reading aloud, honoring and stimulating children’s storytelling, and for deepening learning across content areas.

This section is only for students in the Early Childhood Advanced Standing cohort.

EDUC932A-1 Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 3 TBA Staff TBD W 5:00-7:00 PM
Fieldwork in appropriate settings with supervision and advisement. Candidates in advisement participate in small-group conferences with their advisor. These seminars include the exchange and analysis of ongoing professional experiences and provide a forum for integrating theory with practice. Participants will develop their capacity to construct learning environments and communities that support the development of infants, children, and/or adolescents, depending on the focus of their program. Opportunities to collaborate and co-teach with cooperating teachers and other school personnel are an integral part of the course. This course is taken over two consecutive semesters.

This section is only for students in the Early Childhood Advanced Standing cohort.

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
TESL530-1 Theoretical Foundations: Social, Cultural, and Linguistic Diversity in School 3 TBA Megan Purvis T 7:00-9:00 PM
This course explores how major federal and state laws, language policies, and theories of language development (first and second language acquisition, bilingualism, and translingualism) shape English as a new language (ENL) and bilingual program designs. Candidates will analyze how these programs serve diverse students in PreK-12 urban schools, with a special focus on the education of students who are immigrants, including students with limited or interrupted formal education (SLIFE). Candidates will explore immigration to the United States from a sociocultural perspective, investigate the factors that shape immigrant students’ experiences in schools, and how these impact their identity development. Graduate students will reflect on their own beliefs and perceptions about immigrants and emergent bilingual students while identifying the experiences that have contributed to these beliefs and perceptions. They will survey the demographic landscape of a school and evaluate how the school language allocation policy, curricula, and ENL & bilingual programs respond to the legal rights and the linguistic, socio-emotional and academic needs of emergent bilingual students. Based on their comprehensive analysis and principles of social justice, candidates will develop an advocacy plan to address identified needs of emergent bilingual students and their families.
TESL561-1 Linguistics in Education 3 TBA Gladys Aponte W 7:00-9:00 PM
This course is an introduction to the study of language as it applies to educational settings. Participants will learn about the five basic linguistic structures: phonetics and phonology (sounds and sound patterning), morphology (form of words), syntax (arrangement of words), semantics (meaning), and pragmatics (the use of language). Participants will examine language structure as it exists within the larger context of sociolinguistics, equity, and social justice. The course will investigate how students use their full linguistic repertoire in academic settings (translanguaging), how teachers and society at large perceive language varieties, and how teachers value linguistic diversity in classrooms. The course examines the role of the brain in language development (psycholinguistics), language universals, body language, and discourse analysis. In the second half of the course, TESOL candidates will compare the structure and language features of world Englishes to that of other languages most commonly spoken in schools. The focus of the course will be on the practical application of this knowledge to developing a broader range of instructional strategies to support students’ language proficiency in school. Prerequisite: TESL 530.

TESOL students only

TESL660-1 TESOL Research & Methodologies (Grades PreK-6) 3 TBA Sara Vogel T 4:45-6:45 PM
This course explores TESOL methodologies to inform the teaching of English as a new language in grades PreK-6. The course will provide participants with a foundation for thinking about English as a new language (ENL) instruction as being grounded in a deep understanding of both learner and context.  Participants will develop an understanding of how student identity, language proficiency levels (entering, emerging, transitional, expanding, and commanding), classroom culture and curriculum, and local and state assessments all impact planning and instruction for ENLs.  Using this grounding, participants will determine appropriate language materials, instructional technology, translanguaging strategies, environmental supports, and effective ENL service models to differentiate for the diverse listening, speaking, reading, and writing abilities and needs of their emergent bilingual students. Participants will develop skills in collaborating with a range of colleagues to create inclusive learning environments and effective classroom management strategies aimed at integrating emergent bilingual students, including those with developmental variations, fully into their classroom communities. The course will explore how participants can advocate for an integrated and flexible role of ENL service delivery, preparing participants to design both stand-alone and integrated ENL experiences, as well as differentiating existing curriculum to better meet the needs of students. Prerequisite: TESL 870.

TESOL students only

TESL862-1 Assessment and Differentiation for Linguistically Diverse Students with Developmental Variations 3 TBA Nilda Bayron-Resnick M 4:45-6:45 PM
In this course, participants will review the history of special education as it has impacted students and families from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds, focusing on over-representation in the classifications of intellectual disability, emotional disability, and language/learning disabilities. This course will help English as a new language (ENL) teachers examine the intersection between disability and cultural and linguistic diversity. Participants will unpack assumptions about linguistically and culturally diverse families, and understand how various disabilities interact with learning a new language to better discern typical patterns of language development from language-based disabilities. Participants will have the opportunity to become familiar with formal and informal assessments used to evaluate K-12 students and how these apply to emergent bilingual speakers, as well as concepts including validity, reliability, and basic statistical terminology.  Participants will collaborate with school professionals to explore strategies for working effectively with families of linguistically and culturally diverse children and adolescents.

Progressive Leadership Online Program

For students in the Progressive Leadership Program.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD503R-1 Adult Development: Implications for Educational Leadership 3 Online Jessica Blum-DeStefano TH 7:15-9:15 PM
Students will examine the developmental periods of young, middle, and later years in the human life cycle, with a broad multicultural approach to learning and development. Studies and research are reviewed. Emphasis is given to developmental characteristics that have implications for professional growth and development.

Progressive Leadership Program Cohort 46 students only

LEAD510R-1 Leading Critical Issues in Curriculum and Instruction 3 Online Bisola Neil TH 5:00-7:00 PM
This course focuses on the roles and functions of the school leader in the spheres of curriculum and instruction. It covers the principles and processes that inform curriculum development and their impact on student learning. By explicitly addressing the relationship between curriculum and instruction to critical theory and pedagogy, students will connect positionality to their professional noticing.   At the same time, students will unpack educational equity to become discerning consumers and negotiators of curriculum. In this course, students will envision and conceptualize ways to ensure that all students experience a liberating curriculum by focusing intensively on the knowledge and tools needed to recognize and dismantle dehumanizing spaces that are emblematic of historic and contemporary systems and structures. Finally, the course explores critical issues in leadership in curriculum and instruction and is designed to connect theory to practice as a means of inspiring, guiding, and effecting school change.

Progressive Leadership Program Cohort 45 students only

LEAD537R-1 Organizational Development: Implications for Educational Leadership 3 Online Abbe Futterman T 5:00-7:00 PM
This course examines theory, research, and practice related to organizational development. It covers a wide range of issues related to capacity-building, school vision and culture, and problem solving, and focuses on the relationship between school management and instructional leadership. Students have opportunities to integrate theory and research with administrative practice through readings, small-group work, simulation experiences, observations, interviews, protocols, and case studies.

Progressive Leadership Program Cohort 46 students only

LEAD603R-1 School Change: The Transformational Leader 3 Online Nicole Limperopulos T 5:00-7:00 PM
Current school reform efforts emphasize vision, shared decision making, professional autonomy, positive school structure, and restructuring. How are these concepts being realized in current practice? What choices and constraints accompany the processes of change and staff empowerment? In this course students examine the concepts which face principals in enhancing the effectiveness of schools, as well as the competencies of planning, joint decision making, problem solving, and negotiation. Course work complements and is tailored to the Principals Institute internship experience.

Progressive Leadership Program Cohort 43-44 students only

LEAD615R-1 Processes of Supervision and Professional Development 3 Online Abbe Futterman TH 5:00-7:00 PM
Designed for students who are preparing for supervisory roles or who are actively engaged in such roles, this course focuses on the objectives, functions, and evaluation of the supervisory experience within multicultural educational institutions. Organizational, cultural, and human variables that may facilitate or impede effective supervision are identified, and strategies to maximize or minimize their impact are generated. Supervisory attitudes and skills aimed at increasing professional growth in individual and group supervision are synthesized from a variety of supervisory models, with particular attention given to the clinical supervision model.

Progressive Leadership Program Cohort 43-44 students only

LEAD660R-1 Research for Educational Change 3 Online Jessica Blum-DeStefano T 5:00-7:00 PM
This course is designed to enable leaders, teachers, special educators, and others to be effective consumers of research, as well as to plan and carry out research in response to specific educational questions. Stages of the research process are discussed. Students analyze and evaluate research in the areas of leadership, school effectiveness, administration and supervision, teaching, and curriculum reform, and apply the findings to their everyday roles as educational leaders. It is expected that this course will be valuable for those matriculated students who are initiating projects to satisfy the Independent Study requirement. The format consists of lectures and discussions of the stages of the research process. Class members participate in a project involving research design, data collection, and analysis.

Progressive Leadership Program Cohort 45 students only

LEAD912R-1 Leadership Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 2 Online Staff TBD W 5:00-7:00 PM
This course meets New York State certification requirements for School Building Leadership (SBL) internship experiences. Through close work with a faculty advisor and peers, participants apply their learning from coursework to their field experiences, integrating theory and practice as they reflect on their own professional development. Interns work with a site supervisor and are given substantial school-based responsibilities that involve direct interaction and involvement with staff, students, families, and community leaders. Participants develop the capacity to build and support a positive school culture, build teams, enlist collaboration, and plan and sustain change efforts. Graduate students in advisement participate in small-group sessions with their advisors over 18 months. Participants also serve in a summer internship at a site that is different from their usual work site. At the end of supervised fieldwork, each candidate presents a comprehensive portfolio of internship experiences which meets the program’s Integrative Master’s Project requirement.

Progressive Leadership Program Cohorts 43, 44, and 45 students only

LEAD913R-1 Practicum in Urban School Leadership 1 Online Staff TBD W 7:15-9:15 PM
Progressive Leadership interns continue to engage in focused leadership experiences in their own schools and/or other sites, with an emphasis on research-based strategies for turning around low-performing urban schools. Interns will refine their ongoing leadership work based on the ISLLC Standards and the New York City School Leadership Competencies and will participate in monthly conference group sessions with their advisors. At the end of this course, each candidate presents a comprehensive portfolio of his or her internship experiences. This portfolio meets the program’s Integrative Master’s Project requirement.

Progressive Leadership Program Cohort 45 students only

LEAD9181R-1 Leadership Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 3 Online Staff TBD W 5:00-7:00 PM
This course meets New York State certification requirements for School Building Leadership (SBL) internship experiences. Through close work with a faculty advisor and peers, participants apply their learning from coursework to their field experiences, integrating theory and practice as they reflect on their own professional development. Interns work with a site supervisor and are given substantial school-based responsibilities that involve direct interaction and involvement with staff, students, families, and community leaders. Participants develop the capacity to build and support a positive school culture, build teams, enlist collaboration, and plan and sustain change efforts. Graduate students in advisement participate in small-group sessions with their advisors. At the end of supervised fieldwork, each candidate presents a comprehensive portfolio of internship experiences which meets the program's Integrative Master's Project requirement. This is part one of three semesters of supervised fieldwork. The second part is LEAD9182R.
This is course is part one of three semesters for supervised fieldwork for Progressive Leadership cohort 46.

Early Childhood Leadership Advanced Certificate Online Program

For students in the Early Childhood Leadership Advanced Certificate Program.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
ELPF500E-1 Early Childhood Leadership Portfolio 0 N/A Wendy Pollock See advisor

This section is only for students in Early Childhood Leadership Advanced Certificate cohort 3.

ELPF501E-1 Early Childhood Leadership Integrated Portfolio Project Continuation 0 N/A Wendy Pollock See advisor

This section is only for students in Early Childhood Leadership Advanced Certificate cohort 3.

LEAD510E-1 Leading Critical Issues in Curriculum and Instruction 3 Online Alison Pepper M 5:00-7:00 PM
This course focuses on the roles and functions of the school leader in the spheres of curriculum and instruction. It covers the principles and processes that inform curriculum development and their impact on student learning. By explicitly addressing the relationship between curriculum and instruction to critical theory and pedagogy, students will connect positionality to their professional noticing.   At the same time, students will unpack educational equity to become discerning consumers and negotiators of curriculum. In this course, students will envision and conceptualize ways to ensure that all students experience a liberating curriculum by focusing intensively on the knowledge and tools needed to recognize and dismantle dehumanizing spaces that are emblematic of historic and contemporary systems and structures. Finally, the course explores critical issues in leadership in curriculum and instruction and is designed to connect theory to practice as a means of inspiring, guiding, and effecting school change.

This section is only for students in Early Childhood Leadership Advanced Certificate cohorts 3 and 4.

LEAD624E-1 Fiscal Management, Grant Development and Marketing for Leaders 3 Online Danielle Kolker T 6:30-8:00 PM
This course focuses on the financial management of early childhood programs in childcare settings and public schools as well as the grant development process and marketing strategies that are designed to enhance equitable access to quality early childhood experiences for young children and their families. The intersection of resources both within the community and from various funding streams will be examined to address issues of equity, advocacy and policy in early childhood settings. The first section of the course will address budget development, budget formulation and budget execution and evaluation of operating budgets. The second section of the course will focus on program design and proposal writing for grant development including categorical or competitive models. Participants will also learn about fundraising and marketing strategies designed to reach families with young children in underserved communities.

This section is only for students in Early Childhood Leadership Advanced Certificate cohort 6.

LEAD9201E-1 Early Childhood Leadership Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 3 Online Wendy Pollock W 5:00-7:00 PM
Participants explore a variety of theories and methods of analysis as applied to organizations and their members. Each participant prepares an in-depth analysis of his or her work setting, focusing on organizational structure and behavior.
This is course is part one of two semesters for supervised fieldwork for students in Early Childhood Leadership Advanced Certificate cohort 6.

Future School Leaders Academy

These courses are for students in the Future School Leaders Academy only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD503-1 Adult Development: Implications for Educational Leadership 3 Offsite Jessica Blum-DeStefano TH 4:00-6:00 PM
Students will examine the developmental periods of young, middle, and later years in the human life cycle, with a broad multicultural approach to learning and development. Studies and research are reviewed. Emphasis is given to developmental characteristics that have implications for professional growth and development.

FSLA students only

LEAD532-1 Foundations of Educational Leadership: Ethics and Philosophy 1 Offsite Raymond Sanchez TH 6:30-8:30 PM
This course examines a range of educational philosophies as the foundation for understanding the attitudes, behaviors, and vision of leaders. The relationship between philosophical frameworks and effective leadership styles is analyzed for implications for schools as pluralistic, democratic environments.

FSLA students only

LEAD861-1 Leading a School District I 1 Offsite Andrew Patrick TH 6:30-8:30 PM
This course focuses on the key constituencies in a district and the different relationships that exist among them. It includes understanding the district’s vision, how it was developed, and how it is sustained. The course also examines a district’s demographic and achievement data.

FSLA students only

LEAD9061-1 Future School Leaders Academy Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 1.5 Offsite Staff TBD W 5:00-7:00 PM
This course, for Future School Leaders Academy students, is designed to meet New York State certification requirements for building and district leadership internship experiences. Students develop internship program plans each semester, linked to each semester’s theme and national leadership preparation standards. Students are supervised on site by their internship supervisor/mentor and their advisor; they also participate in learning walks to other schools each semester. Three times a semester, students meet with their advisors in conference groups. Students document and reflect on their leadership development experiences by preparing a comprehensive portfolio, presented at the end of the two-year program. This is part one of four semesters of supervised fieldwork. The second part is LEAD9062.
This is course is part one of four semesters for supervised fieldwork. Formerly LEAD906.

Leadership in Mathematics Education

These courses are for students in the Math Leadership program only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD940-1 Mathematics Leadership Supervised Fieldwork/ Advisement 3 Online Staff TBD See advisor
Fieldwork in an appropriate setting with supervision and advisement.

Math Leadership students only

MACP500-1 Integrative Master’s Project: Culminating Project 0 N/A Staff TBD See mentor
This course is for 3rd-summer Math Leadership students only.

Math Leadership students only

Leadership in Museum Education

These courses are for students in the Museum Leadership program only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD616-1 Museum Management I: Organizational Development 2 Online Staff TBD ThSu 2:00-4:00 PM Dates: 11/7, 11/11, 11/14, 11/18
Students look at the interrelationship of a museum’s mis-sion, strategic planning, and the responsibilities of the board of directors. They learn about the fundamentals of nonprofit management and examine their own institutions in light of best practice. Readings include case studies in institutional change. For Museum Leadership students only.

Museum Leadership students only

LEAD622-1 Museum Management V: Shaping a Vision 2 Online Laura Roberts ThSu 2:00-4:00 PM Dates: 12/5, 12/9, 12/12, 12/16, 12/19
This course examines the challenges contemporary muse-ums face in striving to grow and maintain attendance, meet the expectations of funders, and serve the pressing needs of diverse communities. Students will analyze where their own institutions are situated within the current cultural landscape and acquire some tools and concepts for taking them in new directions. For Museum Leadership students only.

Museum Leadership students only

LEAD623-1 Organizational Theory 2 Online Emily White ThSu 2:00-4:00 PM Dates: 10/10, 10/14, 10/17, 10/21, 10/25
Today’s organizations require more from their leaders and members than hard work and attention to the bottom line. A key challenge is to communicate well in the context of valued priorities, teams, culturally diverse settings, and multiple constituencies. This course helps students to see the “big picture” through readings in organizational theory and change. It also focuses on the skills needed to articulate, analyze, and work collaboratively to solve problems. For Museum Leadership students only.

Museum Leadership students only. The session on October 21 will be from 10:00-12:00 PM and 1:30-3:30 PM. There is an off-cycle session on Monday, October 25.

LEAD950-1 Museum Leadership Supervised Fieldwork/ Advisement 2 Online Staff TBD See advisor
Fieldwork in an appropriate setting with supervision and advisement.

Museum Leadership students only

LEAD953-1 Museum Leadership Seminar III: History and Philosophy of American Museums 1 Online Brian Hogarth ThSu 2:00-4:00 PM Dates: 9/9, 9/12, 9/19, 9/23, 9/26
This seminar looks at the history of museums and other cul-tural organizations, including the ideas of early innovators such as John Cotton Dana, contemporary commentators such as Stephen Weil, and many others. For Museum Leadership students only.

Museum Leadership students only

Museum Studies: Learning and Engagement in Museums and Cultural Organizations

These courses are for students in the Learning and Engagement in Museums and Cultural Organizations program only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD504-1 Human Development 3 Online Jessica Blum-DeStefano Sat 3:00-5:00 PM Dates: 9/25, 10/2, 10/7 (Th), 10/9, 10/23, 10/30, 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 12/11, 12/18
A great deal of educational and public work in museums, libraries and cultural organizations revolves around the creation and implementation of programs for specific audiences. To support this work, this course is divided into several sections that, together, cover essential ideas about development in humans from childhood to adulthood, along with associated teaching and learning strategies. Observations of children, teen and adult programs and the growing field of access and wellness programs will be included. As we examine research on the cognitive, social, emotional, linguistic and physical development of children, we will pay attention to how these trajectories manifest across cultures and through interaction with biology and the environment. Understanding these developmental theories, and other patterns that evolve across the lifespan, will deepen how educators plan for and scaffold childrens’ and adults’ learning in museums and cultural settings.

LEMCO students only

LEAD505-1 Teaching and Learning with Objects 1 Online Brian Hogarth TH 5:30-7:30 PM Dates: 11/23 (T), 12/2, 12/9, 12/16
Objects, specimens, collections, archives, plants, animals, buildings and unique spaces are at the heart of museums, libraries and cultural organizations. Educators working in these types of organizations should be familiar with the many ways objects, collections and spaces impact users: provoking memories and imagination, offering multi-sensory experiences, encouraging inquiry and dialogue, understanding cultural values, and providing tangible evidence of life, history and culture, past and present. In this course, participants will practice unpacking the many layers and dimensions of objects, including decolonizing objects and ensuring that diverse perspectives are included when devising teaching and interpretive strategies. Some of the themes touched on here will continue in the Digital Learning, Programming and Designing Educational Spaces courses.

LEMCO students only

LEAD506-1 Educational & Social Role of Museums and Cultural Organizations 2 Online Staff TBD T 5:30-7:30 PM Dates: 9/21, 9/28, 10/5, 10/12, 10/26, 11/2, 11/9, 11/16, 11/30, 12/14
This course introduces the broader historical developments of learning and engagement work in a variety of museums, libraries and other nonprofit cultural organizations, along with the current emphasis on community engagement, access and diversity, building community partnerships and collaborations. Educators working in these spaces serve a variety of publics, onsite and off, from schools and teachers, to adolescents and families, to young as well as older adults. This course serves as a critical introduction to the roles that educators play in supporting these publics, as well as supporting organizational missions and public understanding around artistic and cultural diversity, heritage and the natural world etc. through various programmatic means. This course includes several site visits to different institutions in the New York City area.

LEMCO students only

LEAD507-1 Learning Theories 1 Online Brian Hogarth TThSa 3-5; 6-8 PM Dates: 9/11, 9/14, 9/18, 9/23, 9/30
Most museums and cultural organizations have had education at the core of their missions since inception, but informal education is a relatively new discipline, still evolving and defining its place. Underlying these new directions are assumptions that explain what happens when learners engage with new phenomena, places and experiences, individually and with others. This course will explore fundamental theories around education and learning, social and cultural dimensions of learning and recent critical theories involving race, gender and ideas about shared or connected learning. By the end of the course, participants will be able to interpret and apply dimensions of various learning theories when articulating outcomes and assumptions that support both existing and new programs and their users.

LEMCO students only

LEAD9601-1 Museum Advisement 2 Offsite Staff TBD See advisor
Fieldwork in an appropriate setting with supervision and advisement.

School District Leader Online Program

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD861R-1 Leading a School District I 1 Online Alice Gottlieb, Brian Monahan T 5:00-6:00 PM Date: 9/14
This course focuses on the key constituencies in a district and the different relationships that exist among them. It includes understanding the district’s vision, how it was developed, and how it is sustained. The course also examines a district’s demographic and achievement data.

Courses within this program are for online students only.

LEAD862R-1 Leading a School District II 1 Online Alice Gottlieb, Brian Monahan T 5:00-6:00 PM Date: 10/5
This course looks at the varied roles and responsibilities of the superintendent/district leader and ties them to the challenges of creating and sustaining dynamic, humane, effective learning communities. It emphasizes the ways that district leaders’ decisions—in such spheres as instructional policy, planning, fiscal and human resources, facilities, legal and equity issues, accountability, and external relationships—affect schools’ capacity to engage students and strengthen achievement.

Courses within this program are for online students only.

LEAD863R-1 Leading a School District III 1 Online Alice Gottlieb, Brian Monahan T 5:00-6:00 PM Date: 11/2
This course focuses on how human and financial resources are allocated in a district to support the instructional program and the goals of the superintendent and school board.

Courses within this program are for online students only.

LEAD864R-1 Leading a School District IV 1 Online Alice Gottlieb, Brian Monahan T 5:00-6:00 PM Date: 11/16
This course focuses on examining a district’s budget from multiple points of view: theoretical, conceptual, and practical. Participants will become familiar with all phases of the budget process, from its inception to its implementation throughout a district. Content will be closely aligned, whenever possible, with the “real world” budgets currently in place in districts.

Courses within this program are for online students only.

LEAD870R-1 Special Education Leadership: The District Perspective 1 Online Alice Gottlieb, Brian Monahan T 5:00-6:00 PM Date: 12/7
Strong leadership at the district level is essential if schools are to become positive and successful learning environments for diverse learners, including children with disabilities and those at risk of failure. This course covers issues that enhance or create obstacles for inclusive schools and communities. Issues of equity are evident in most school districts and challenge educators to transform educational environments and processes to meet diverse needs. The course will address the issue of “achievement gaps” as well as links between social class and achievement in schools.

Courses within this program are for online students only.

LEAD9081R-1 School District Leadership Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 3 Online Nancy Mann See advisor
Fieldwork in an appropriate setting with supervision and advisement.
This is course is part one of two semesters for supervised fieldwork for new online SDL students in fall 2021.
LEAD908R-1 School District Leadership Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 3 Online Nancy Mann See advisor
Fieldwork in an appropriate setting with supervision and advisement.

Courses within this program are for online students only.

Aspiring Superintendent's Academy

These courses are for students in the ASA program only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD864A-1 Leading a School District IV 1 Offsite Nicole Limperopulos W 5:00-7:00 PM
This course focuses on examining a district’s budget from multiple points of view: theoretical, conceptual, and practical. Participants will become familiar with all phases of the budget process, from its inception to its implementation throughout a district. Content will be closely aligned, whenever possible, with the “real world” budgets currently in place in districts.

ASA students only

LEAD908A-1 School District Leadership Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 3 Offsite Nicole Limperopulos W 7:00-9:00 PM
Fieldwork in an appropriate setting with supervision and advisement.

ASA students only

LEAP Program

These courses are for students in the LEAP program only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD510L-1 Leading Critical Issues in Curriculum and Instruction 3 Offsite Nicole Limperopulos T 5:00-7:00 PM
This course focuses on the roles and functions of the school leader in the spheres of curriculum and instruction. It covers the principles and processes that inform curriculum development and their impact on student learning. By explicitly addressing the relationship between curriculum and instruction to critical theory and pedagogy, students will connect positionality to their professional noticing.   At the same time, students will unpack educational equity to become discerning consumers and negotiators of curriculum. In this course, students will envision and conceptualize ways to ensure that all students experience a liberating curriculum by focusing intensively on the knowledge and tools needed to recognize and dismantle dehumanizing spaces that are emblematic of historic and contemporary systems and structures. Finally, the course explores critical issues in leadership in curriculum and instruction and is designed to connect theory to practice as a means of inspiring, guiding, and effecting school change.

LEAP students only

LEAD530L-1 Education Policy, Advocacy, and Law 3 Offsite Nicole Limperopulos TH 5:00-7:00 PM
Education policy is examined in the context of historical, philosophical, economic, sociocultural, political, and legal perspectives. Leadership theory and practices that create learning environments responsive to the multicultural constituencies of schools, as well as the laws that sustain them, are analyzed.

LEAP students only

LEAD660L-1 Research for Educational Change 3 Offsite Nicole Limperopulos T 7:15-9:15 PM
This course is designed to enable leaders, teachers, special educators, and others to be effective consumers of research, as well as to plan and carry out research in response to specific educational questions. Stages of the research process are discussed. Students analyze and evaluate research in the areas of leadership, school effectiveness, administration and supervision, teaching, and curriculum reform, and apply the findings to their everyday roles as educational leaders. It is expected that this course will be valuable for those matriculated students who are initiating projects to satisfy the Independent Study requirement. The format consists of lectures and discussions of the stages of the research process. Class members participate in a project involving research design, data collection, and analysis.

LEAP students only

LEAD918L-1 Leadership Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 3 Offsite Nicole Limperopulos W 5:00-7:00 PM
This course meets New York State certification requirements for School Building Leadership (SBL) internship experiences. Through close work with a faculty advisor and peers, participants apply their learning from coursework to their field experiences, integrating theory and practice as they reflect on their own professional development. Interns work with a site supervisor and are given substantial school-based responsibilities that involve direct interaction and involvement with staff, students, families, and community leaders. Participants develop the capacity to build and support a positive school culture, build teams, enlist collaboration, and plan and sustain change efforts. Graduate students in advisement participate in small-group sessions with their advisors. At the end of supervised fieldwork, each candidate presents a comprehensive portfolio of internship experiences which meets the program’s Integrative Master’s Project requirement.

LEAP students only

Yonkers Urban Leadership

These courses are for students in the Yonkers Urban Leadership program only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD503Y-1 Adult Development: Implications for Educational Leadership 3 Offsite Nicole Limperopulos TH 5:00-7:00 PM
Students will examine the developmental periods of young, middle, and later years in the human life cycle, with a broad multicultural approach to learning and development. Studies and research are reviewed. Emphasis is given to developmental characteristics that have implications for professional growth and development.

Yonkers students only

LEAD510Y-1 Leading Critical Issues in Curriculum and Instruction 3 Offsite Nicole Limperopulos T 5:00-7:00 PM
This course focuses on the roles and functions of the school leader in the spheres of curriculum and instruction. It covers the principles and processes that inform curriculum development and their impact on student learning. By explicitly addressing the relationship between curriculum and instruction to critical theory and pedagogy, students will connect positionality to their professional noticing.   At the same time, students will unpack educational equity to become discerning consumers and negotiators of curriculum. In this course, students will envision and conceptualize ways to ensure that all students experience a liberating curriculum by focusing intensively on the knowledge and tools needed to recognize and dismantle dehumanizing spaces that are emblematic of historic and contemporary systems and structures. Finally, the course explores critical issues in leadership in curriculum and instruction and is designed to connect theory to practice as a means of inspiring, guiding, and effecting school change.

Yonkers students only

LEAD912Y-1 Leadership Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 2 Offsite Nicole Limperopulos W 5:00-7:00 PM
This course meets New York State certification requirements for School Building Leadership (SBL) internship experiences. Through close work with a faculty advisor and peers, participants apply their learning from coursework to their field experiences, integrating theory and practice as they reflect on their own professional development. Interns work with a site supervisor and are given substantial school-based responsibilities that involve direct interaction and involvement with staff, students, families, and community leaders. Participants develop the capacity to build and support a positive school culture, build teams, enlist collaboration, and plan and sustain change efforts. Graduate students in advisement participate in small-group sessions with their advisors over 18 months. Participants also serve in a summer internship at a site that is different from their usual work site. At the end of supervised fieldwork, each candidate presents a comprehensive portfolio of internship experiences which meets the program’s Integrative Master’s Project requirement.

Yonkers students only

Matriculation Maintenance

A degree can only be conferred for currently enrolled students. Students anticipating degree completion pending submission of prior semester grades must be registered in the current term, in order for their degree to be awarded. If students are not registered for classes in the semester of their graduation, they must register for matriculation maintenance by the end of the semester add/drop period. Registration for matriculation maintenance, MMNT500, can be conducted on myBSC during web registration. A $50 fee applies.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
MMNT500-1 Matriculation Maintenance 0 N/A Staff TBD Not applicable
A degree can only be conferred for currently enrolled students. If students are not registered for classes, the Integrative Master's Project, or supervised fieldwork in the semester they intend to graduate, they must register for matriculation maintenance by the end of the add/drop period. This situation might occur, for example, if students are completing coursework for a prior class in which they received a grade of Incomplete.
MMNT500R-1 Matriculation Maintenance 0 N/A Staff TBD Not applicable
A degree can only be conferred for currently enrolled students. If students are not registered for classes, the Integrative Master's Project, or supervised fieldwork in the semester they intend to graduate, they must register for matriculation maintenance by the end of the add/drop period. This situation might occur, for example, if students are completing coursework for a prior class in which they received a grade of Incomplete.