Summer Long 2024

May 13, 2024—July 25, 2024

Bank Street Graduate School of Education credit hour calculations for degree and certificate programs follow NYSED guidelines, which are based on the U.S. Department of Education’s definition of credit hour. Please view the Credit Hour Assignment Policy for more information.

Religious Observance:The College respects individuals’ religious observances. If you are unable to make any class session, including a Friday session, because of religious observance, please notify the course instructor by the first class session so that an alternative means can be identified for fulfilling missed class material and course assignments.

Childhood Special and General Education Online Program

Courses within this program are for online students only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
EDUC500R-1R Child Development 3 Online Troy Pinkney M 7:00-9:00 PM
In this course we will examine the interactions among the cognitive, social, emotional, linguistic, and physical development of children from infancy into adolescence. We will pay close attention to children as makers of meaning in the contexts of their development, including family, school, socioeconomic class, and culture. Through reading classic and current literature, we will attend to some of the larger questions about development, such as the relationship between nature and nurture, the role of developmental theory, and the tension between the search for developmental universals and the reality of individual differences. The goal is to make developmental theory vibrant and meaningful so that the generalized theoretical child comes to enhance and inform how one understands individual children.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online childhood and early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You will be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC521-1R Supporting Students & Families through Advocacy & Wraparound Planning 1 Online Jacob Dixon Not applicable
Participants will engage in a one credit, asynchronous learning experience designed to increase awareness, understanding and practices around advocacy and wraparound planning, with a focus on children with dis/abilities. Participants will critically examine tools, resources, and planning processes that can better support children and families’ successful engagement with schools and the larger community. Through engagement with interactive online materials and scholarly readings, participants will reflect on their own lived experience in understanding the role of an advocate. Participants will also reflect on and apply an understanding of an equitable, strengths-based, collaborative approach to ensure the academic and social needs of children are met. Participants will learn strategies in creating comprehensive holistic pathways of support that put children and families at the center.
This course is for students in the online programs only. It is self-paced and runs fully asynchronously.
EDUC525R-1R Assistive Technology as a Tool for Providing Educational Access 1 Online Mark Surabian W 7:00-9:05 PM 5/22, 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/26, 7/10
This course examines how technology can create opportunities for access and expression for learners, including children with variations in learning, sensory, communication, and physical development. Through readings, discussion, and experimenting with a variety of actual technologies, participants will strengthen their capacities to match such tools to learner needs in diverse learning environments and activities. Participants will reflect on classroom experiences to ascertain how accessibility for learners can be enhanced. They will consider broader issues of access and equity, as they deepen their understandings of how technology can assist in creating more inclusive learning environments.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online childhood and early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You may be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC535R-1R Science for Teachers (Grades N – 6) 2 Online Mona Arriola McNamara W 7:00-9:00 PM
Science for Teachers focuses on developing a science way of thinking and doing in PreK-6th grade classrooms. Each session deepens an understanding that doing science requires direct sensory encounters with the physical world. By experiencing first-hand investigations of physical and biological materials and related phenomena, participants create a range of representations that can uncover existing patterns and concepts. Discussions, readings, and reflective writings deepen and broaden work done with physical materials. Participants will reflect on their own learning as they work to construct meaningful science experiences that respond to the developmental levels of their students and affirm students’ cultural, linguistic, and learning diversity. The course explores evidence-based ways of making sense of the world that support the integration of science inquiry across the curriculum.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online childhood and early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You will be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC539-1R Understanding Foundational Mathematics Concepts in Early Childhood Teaching 1 Online Jaime Palmer Not applicable
Teachers who are comfortable with mathematics develop learners who are comfortable with mathematics. This course offers experiences that support the development of five foundational math concepts:  Classifying and Sorting, Measurement, Numbers and Counting, Patterns and Reasoning, and Shapes and Spatial Relationships. Through a progression of investigative activities in each concept, participants will build conceptual understanding and reflect on their evolving competency through various artifacts that indicate evidence of their work and growth. Through a range of concrete developmental activities and connected readings, participants will learn to make sense of mathematical concepts for themselves as well as their students.
This course is for students in the online programs only. It is self-paced and runs fully asynchronously.
EDUC542R-1R Assessment and Instruction in Teaching Mathematics to Children with Learning Variations 2 Online Jaime Palmer TH 7:00-9:00 PM
This course has been designed to convey the process of clini-cal teaching. Through focus on an individual child, students will be concerned with the practical and theoretical aspects of learning style, language as a learning tool, perceptual abilities and disabilities, dyscalculia, and specific arithmetic disability. Students will learn to analyze children’s strengths and weaknesses and to describe and clearly communicate specific recommendations for the child’s parents and classroom teacher.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online childhood and early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You will be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC542R-2R Assessment and Instruction in Teaching Mathematics to Children with Learning Variations 2 Online Stephen Holzer TH 7:00-9:00 PM
This course has been designed to convey the process of clini-cal teaching. Through focus on an individual child, students will be concerned with the practical and theoretical aspects of learning style, language as a learning tool, perceptual abilities and disabilities, dyscalculia, and specific arithmetic disability. Students will learn to analyze children’s strengths and weaknesses and to describe and clearly communicate specific recommendations for the child’s parents and classroom teacher.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online childhood and early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You will be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC610-1R Computing For What? Exploring CS Education Visions for School Environments 1 Online Sara Vogel Not applicable
This one-credit asynchronous course exposes participants to concepts, practices, and perspectives guiding computing education, especially as it has been integrated into Early Childhood and Childhood school environments. Through engagement with practitioner-facing and scholarly readings and online materials in computing education, videos of classroom practice, curricular review, and interactive hands-on tinkering with computing tools, participants will define computing education, distinguishing it from other kinds of technology education. They will consider where and how computing practices and concepts are embedded in their own lives and in the lives of their students. They will explore rationale for computing education, including rationale that center equity, social justice, and critical perspectives on the technology industry. Participants will identify the values and visions that (might) drive their own practice and work in diverse early childhood and childhood settings, attending especially to visions that center problem-solving and expression through computational thinking and literacies.
This course is for students in the online programs only. It is self-paced and runs fully asynchronously.
EDUC803R-1R Developmental Variations 2 Online Sean O'Shea T 7:00-9:00 PM
This course is designed to increase participants’ awareness and understanding of the educational, social, cultural, linguistic and developmental implications of disability from historical, legal, and socio-political perspectives. The course will critically examine state and federal special education and disability laws and regulations and their implementation across a range of settings including their intersection with issues of race, class, language and gender. There is an emphasis on understanding how disability is socially constructed at the levels of family, community, school, and the larger society.  Participants apply an understanding of developmental variations to analyze and create accessible learning experiences for children. Prerequisite: EDUC 500 or permission of instructor.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online childhood and early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You will be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC803R-2R Developmental Variations 2 Online Kristen Kaelin T 7:00-9:00 PM
This course is designed to increase participants’ awareness and understanding of the educational, social, cultural, linguistic and developmental implications of disability from historical, legal, and socio-political perspectives. The course will critically examine state and federal special education and disability laws and regulations and their implementation across a range of settings including their intersection with issues of race, class, language and gender. There is an emphasis on understanding how disability is socially constructed at the levels of family, community, school, and the larger society.  Participants apply an understanding of developmental variations to analyze and create accessible learning experiences for children. Prerequisite: EDUC 500 or permission of instructor.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online childhood and early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You will be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
IMP2R-1R Collaborative Student Faculty Inquiry 0 Online Soyoung Park See mentor
The Collaborative Student-Faculty Inquiry is a one-semester small peer group option focused on a specific topic or issue. These topics, based on professional interests faculty would like to explore along with students, are posted each fall and spring. You identify a particular aspect of the topic or issue to investigate and, with your peers, determine a format in which to coordinate and present the findings. Students present their projects in mid-January or the week of graduation in May.

This IMP is for students in the fully online program only. This IMP will include synchronous meetings which will be determined by the IMP facilitator in collaboration with students.

Please fill out this form to confirm your IMP request by April 11th:
IMP Request Form

If your Program Director approves your request, you will be registered for this IMP by your SSA.

IMP3R-1R Mentored Directed Essay 0 Online Staff TBD See mentor
Students choosing to do a Mentored Directed Essay work with an assigned faculty mentor to design an essay that is based on existing, program-specific prepared questions. These questions are designed to help you think and write about the salient issues pertaining to your chosen area of study. Working with your mentor, you may adapt questions to support the distinctive needs of your professional growth, interests, and current work situation. This option is designed to provide structure and focus with maximum flexibility, and is intended to be completed within a single semester. This option is offered all semesters.

Please fill out this form to confirm your IMP request by April 11th:
IMP Request Form

If your Program Director approves your request, you will be registered for this IMP by your SSA.

Students will receive the name of their faculty mentor no later than the end of the add/drop period. Students completing a Mentored Directed Essay (MDE) should find the essay for their program and become familiar with the project before meeting with their mentors. To access the MDE, log into myBSC and go to Resources > Integrative Master's Project (IMP).

IS500R-1R Independent Study 0 Online Staff TBD See mentor
The Independent Study is an original work that you initiate, often growing out of a meaningful course assignment or an idea, question, or experience rooted in a fieldwork or work setting. Students work with a faculty mentor who has expertise in the particular area of study. The Independent Study usually includes two semesters of research and writing, and is most closely aligned with a traditional master’s thesis. Independent Studies are made accessible to the public though the Bank Street Library's online catalogue.

This IMP is for students who have not yet begun their Independent Study. Students continuing an Independent Study from a previous semester should contact their SSA for registration.

This IMP begins runs until the end of the Summer Long term. A second semester is optional.

To register, please fill out this form to confirm your IMP request by April 11th:
IMP Request Form.

If your Program Director approves your request, you will be registered for this IMP by your SSA.

IMPORTANT NOTE: In order to be registered for an Independent Study (IS500) you must have already secured a faculty mentor who has reviewed your Independent Study (IS) proposal and has committed to serve as your IS mentor.

Childhood Special Education Online Program

Courses within this program are for online students only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
EDUC521-1R Supporting Students & Families through Advocacy & Wraparound Planning 1 Online Jacob Dixon Not applicable
Participants will engage in a one credit, asynchronous learning experience designed to increase awareness, understanding and practices around advocacy and wraparound planning, with a focus on children with dis/abilities. Participants will critically examine tools, resources, and planning processes that can better support children and families’ successful engagement with schools and the larger community. Through engagement with interactive online materials and scholarly readings, participants will reflect on their own lived experience in understanding the role of an advocate. Participants will also reflect on and apply an understanding of an equitable, strengths-based, collaborative approach to ensure the academic and social needs of children are met. Participants will learn strategies in creating comprehensive holistic pathways of support that put children and families at the center.
This course is for students in the online programs only. It is self-paced and runs fully asynchronously.
EDUC525R-1R Assistive Technology as a Tool for Providing Educational Access 1 Online Mark Surabian W 7:00-9:05 PM 5/22, 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/26, 7/10
This course examines how technology can create opportunities for access and expression for learners, including children with variations in learning, sensory, communication, and physical development. Through readings, discussion, and experimenting with a variety of actual technologies, participants will strengthen their capacities to match such tools to learner needs in diverse learning environments and activities. Participants will reflect on classroom experiences to ascertain how accessibility for learners can be enhanced. They will consider broader issues of access and equity, as they deepen their understandings of how technology can assist in creating more inclusive learning environments.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online childhood and early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You may be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC539-1R Understanding Foundational Mathematics Concepts in Early Childhood Teaching 1 Online Jaime Palmer Not applicable
Teachers who are comfortable with mathematics develop learners who are comfortable with mathematics. This course offers experiences that support the development of five foundational math concepts:  Classifying and Sorting, Measurement, Numbers and Counting, Patterns and Reasoning, and Shapes and Spatial Relationships. Through a progression of investigative activities in each concept, participants will build conceptual understanding and reflect on their evolving competency through various artifacts that indicate evidence of their work and growth. Through a range of concrete developmental activities and connected readings, participants will learn to make sense of mathematical concepts for themselves as well as their students.
This course is for students in the online programs only. It is self-paced and runs fully asynchronously.
EDUC542R-1R Assessment and Instruction in Teaching Mathematics to Children with Learning Variations 2 Online Jaime Palmer TH 7:00-9:00 PM
This course has been designed to convey the process of clini-cal teaching. Through focus on an individual child, students will be concerned with the practical and theoretical aspects of learning style, language as a learning tool, perceptual abilities and disabilities, dyscalculia, and specific arithmetic disability. Students will learn to analyze children’s strengths and weaknesses and to describe and clearly communicate specific recommendations for the child’s parents and classroom teacher.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online childhood and early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You will be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC542R-2R Assessment and Instruction in Teaching Mathematics to Children with Learning Variations 2 Online Stephen Holzer TH 7:00-9:00 PM
This course has been designed to convey the process of clini-cal teaching. Through focus on an individual child, students will be concerned with the practical and theoretical aspects of learning style, language as a learning tool, perceptual abilities and disabilities, dyscalculia, and specific arithmetic disability. Students will learn to analyze children’s strengths and weaknesses and to describe and clearly communicate specific recommendations for the child’s parents and classroom teacher.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online childhood and early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You will be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC610-1R Computing For What? Exploring CS Education Visions for School Environments 1 Online Sara Vogel Not applicable
This one-credit asynchronous course exposes participants to concepts, practices, and perspectives guiding computing education, especially as it has been integrated into Early Childhood and Childhood school environments. Through engagement with practitioner-facing and scholarly readings and online materials in computing education, videos of classroom practice, curricular review, and interactive hands-on tinkering with computing tools, participants will define computing education, distinguishing it from other kinds of technology education. They will consider where and how computing practices and concepts are embedded in their own lives and in the lives of their students. They will explore rationale for computing education, including rationale that center equity, social justice, and critical perspectives on the technology industry. Participants will identify the values and visions that (might) drive their own practice and work in diverse early childhood and childhood settings, attending especially to visions that center problem-solving and expression through computational thinking and literacies.
This course is for students in the online programs only. It is self-paced and runs fully asynchronously.
EDUC803R-1R Developmental Variations 2 Online Sean O'Shea T 7:00-9:00 PM
This course is designed to increase participants’ awareness and understanding of the educational, social, cultural, linguistic and developmental implications of disability from historical, legal, and socio-political perspectives. The course will critically examine state and federal special education and disability laws and regulations and their implementation across a range of settings including their intersection with issues of race, class, language and gender. There is an emphasis on understanding how disability is socially constructed at the levels of family, community, school, and the larger society.  Participants apply an understanding of developmental variations to analyze and create accessible learning experiences for children. Prerequisite: EDUC 500 or permission of instructor.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online childhood and early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You will be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC803R-2R Developmental Variations 2 Online Kristen Kaelin T 7:00-9:00 PM
This course is designed to increase participants’ awareness and understanding of the educational, social, cultural, linguistic and developmental implications of disability from historical, legal, and socio-political perspectives. The course will critically examine state and federal special education and disability laws and regulations and their implementation across a range of settings including their intersection with issues of race, class, language and gender. There is an emphasis on understanding how disability is socially constructed at the levels of family, community, school, and the larger society.  Participants apply an understanding of developmental variations to analyze and create accessible learning experiences for children. Prerequisite: EDUC 500 or permission of instructor.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online childhood and early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You will be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.

Early Childhood Special and General Education Online Program

Courses within this program are for online students only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
EDUC500R-1R Child Development 3 Online Troy Pinkney M 7:00-9:00 PM
In this course we will examine the interactions among the cognitive, social, emotional, linguistic, and physical development of children from infancy into adolescence. We will pay close attention to children as makers of meaning in the contexts of their development, including family, school, socioeconomic class, and culture. Through reading classic and current literature, we will attend to some of the larger questions about development, such as the relationship between nature and nurture, the role of developmental theory, and the tension between the search for developmental universals and the reality of individual differences. The goal is to make developmental theory vibrant and meaningful so that the generalized theoretical child comes to enhance and inform how one understands individual children.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online childhood and early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You will be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC521-1R Supporting Students & Families through Advocacy & Wraparound Planning 1 Online Jacob Dixon Not applicable
Participants will engage in a one credit, asynchronous learning experience designed to increase awareness, understanding and practices around advocacy and wraparound planning, with a focus on children with dis/abilities. Participants will critically examine tools, resources, and planning processes that can better support children and families’ successful engagement with schools and the larger community. Through engagement with interactive online materials and scholarly readings, participants will reflect on their own lived experience in understanding the role of an advocate. Participants will also reflect on and apply an understanding of an equitable, strengths-based, collaborative approach to ensure the academic and social needs of children are met. Participants will learn strategies in creating comprehensive holistic pathways of support that put children and families at the center.
This course is for students in the online programs only. It is self-paced and runs fully asynchronously.
EDUC525R-1R Assistive Technology as a Tool for Providing Educational Access 1 Online Mark Surabian W 7:00-9:05 PM 5/22, 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/26, 7/10
This course examines how technology can create opportunities for access and expression for learners, including children with variations in learning, sensory, communication, and physical development. Through readings, discussion, and experimenting with a variety of actual technologies, participants will strengthen their capacities to match such tools to learner needs in diverse learning environments and activities. Participants will reflect on classroom experiences to ascertain how accessibility for learners can be enhanced. They will consider broader issues of access and equity, as they deepen their understandings of how technology can assist in creating more inclusive learning environments.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online childhood and early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You may be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC535R-1R Science for Teachers (Grades N – 6) 2 Online Mona Arriola McNamara W 7:00-9:00 PM
Science for Teachers focuses on developing a science way of thinking and doing in PreK-6th grade classrooms. Each session deepens an understanding that doing science requires direct sensory encounters with the physical world. By experiencing first-hand investigations of physical and biological materials and related phenomena, participants create a range of representations that can uncover existing patterns and concepts. Discussions, readings, and reflective writings deepen and broaden work done with physical materials. Participants will reflect on their own learning as they work to construct meaningful science experiences that respond to the developmental levels of their students and affirm students’ cultural, linguistic, and learning diversity. The course explores evidence-based ways of making sense of the world that support the integration of science inquiry across the curriculum.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online childhood and early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You will be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC539-1R Understanding Foundational Mathematics Concepts in Early Childhood Teaching 1 Online Jaime Palmer Not applicable
Teachers who are comfortable with mathematics develop learners who are comfortable with mathematics. This course offers experiences that support the development of five foundational math concepts:  Classifying and Sorting, Measurement, Numbers and Counting, Patterns and Reasoning, and Shapes and Spatial Relationships. Through a progression of investigative activities in each concept, participants will build conceptual understanding and reflect on their evolving competency through various artifacts that indicate evidence of their work and growth. Through a range of concrete developmental activities and connected readings, participants will learn to make sense of mathematical concepts for themselves as well as their students.
This course is for students in the online programs only. It is self-paced and runs fully asynchronously.
EDUC542R-1R Assessment and Instruction in Teaching Mathematics to Children with Learning Variations 2 Online Jaime Palmer TH 7:00-9:00 PM
This course has been designed to convey the process of clini-cal teaching. Through focus on an individual child, students will be concerned with the practical and theoretical aspects of learning style, language as a learning tool, perceptual abilities and disabilities, dyscalculia, and specific arithmetic disability. Students will learn to analyze children’s strengths and weaknesses and to describe and clearly communicate specific recommendations for the child’s parents and classroom teacher.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online childhood and early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You will be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC542R-2R Assessment and Instruction in Teaching Mathematics to Children with Learning Variations 2 Online Stephen Holzer TH 7:00-9:00 PM
This course has been designed to convey the process of clini-cal teaching. Through focus on an individual child, students will be concerned with the practical and theoretical aspects of learning style, language as a learning tool, perceptual abilities and disabilities, dyscalculia, and specific arithmetic disability. Students will learn to analyze children’s strengths and weaknesses and to describe and clearly communicate specific recommendations for the child’s parents and classroom teacher.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online childhood and early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You will be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC590R-1R Arts Workshop for Teachers (Grades N – 6) 2 Online Maria Richa T 7:00-9:00 PM
This studio course stresses the relationship of expression in arts and crafts to aspects of teaching and learning in other areas. Students develop approaches for discovering the use and origins of materials as well as their role in the curriculum. The course helps teachers develop a basic art program in their classrooms. Studio experiences include painting, collage, clay work, printmaking, and such crafts as puppet making, dyeing, and weaving. Readings and class discussion deal with the development of art curricula using child development as a base. Students study children’s art through slides and children’s actual work.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You will be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC610-1R Computing For What? Exploring CS Education Visions for School Environments 1 Online Sara Vogel Not applicable
This one-credit asynchronous course exposes participants to concepts, practices, and perspectives guiding computing education, especially as it has been integrated into Early Childhood and Childhood school environments. Through engagement with practitioner-facing and scholarly readings and online materials in computing education, videos of classroom practice, curricular review, and interactive hands-on tinkering with computing tools, participants will define computing education, distinguishing it from other kinds of technology education. They will consider where and how computing practices and concepts are embedded in their own lives and in the lives of their students. They will explore rationale for computing education, including rationale that center equity, social justice, and critical perspectives on the technology industry. Participants will identify the values and visions that (might) drive their own practice and work in diverse early childhood and childhood settings, attending especially to visions that center problem-solving and expression through computational thinking and literacies.
This course is for students in the online programs only. It is self-paced and runs fully asynchronously.
EDUC629R-1R Education of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders 1 Online Stephanie McCaskill W 7:00-9:05 PM 5/15, 5/22, 5/29, 6/5 , 6/12, 6/26
This course will explore autism spectrum disorder (ASD) from historical, cultural, political, and developmental lenses. It will support graduate students in thinking deeply and from multiple perspectives about the evolution of our understandings about and interventions with the broad range of characteristics of learning and development attributed to people with ASD. This course considers the significance of home and/or school as the primary sources of educational intervention and direct services for children with ASD. Participants will consider the importance of providing young children with ASD with an educational program that is responsive to each child’s unique pattern of relative strengths and vulnerabilities, and will learn ways to partner in this work with a diverse range of families.  Participants will explore the use of assistive technology as a tool for supporting student learning, communication, and independence.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You may be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC803R-1R Developmental Variations 2 Online Sean O'Shea T 7:00-9:00 PM
This course is designed to increase participants’ awareness and understanding of the educational, social, cultural, linguistic and developmental implications of disability from historical, legal, and socio-political perspectives. The course will critically examine state and federal special education and disability laws and regulations and their implementation across a range of settings including their intersection with issues of race, class, language and gender. There is an emphasis on understanding how disability is socially constructed at the levels of family, community, school, and the larger society.  Participants apply an understanding of developmental variations to analyze and create accessible learning experiences for children. Prerequisite: EDUC 500 or permission of instructor.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online childhood and early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You will be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC803R-2R Developmental Variations 2 Online Kristen Kaelin T 7:00-9:00 PM
This course is designed to increase participants’ awareness and understanding of the educational, social, cultural, linguistic and developmental implications of disability from historical, legal, and socio-political perspectives. The course will critically examine state and federal special education and disability laws and regulations and their implementation across a range of settings including their intersection with issues of race, class, language and gender. There is an emphasis on understanding how disability is socially constructed at the levels of family, community, school, and the larger society.  Participants apply an understanding of developmental variations to analyze and create accessible learning experiences for children. Prerequisite: EDUC 500 or permission of instructor.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online childhood and early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You will be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC823R-1R Play Techniques for Early Childhood Settings 1 Online Kate Ascetta M 7:00-9:05 PM 6/10, 6/17, 6/24, 7/8, 7/15, 7/22
This course explores play as central to supporting the social, emotional, and cognitive development of children with varying developmental and learning variations.  Participants will learn a variety of therapeutic play techniques that promote self-regulation, self-esteem, and emotional expression, and development across domains. This course is appropriate for general and special education teachers, parents, caregivers, child life specialists, social workers, therapists and counselors. Participants are required to have prior coursework focused on child development and on developmental variations. Prerequisite: EDUC 803 or with permission of instructor.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You may be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC994R-1R Extended Field Experiences 1 Online Staff TBD T 4:00-6:05 PM 6/25, 7/2, 7/9, 7/16, 7/23
This one-credit course provides working teachers, interns, and assistant teachers the opportunity to meet the mandated New York State regulations for certification. The State regulations require teacher candidates to work in an additional grade band level in a high needs public setting, according to the age band of their certification. In addition, there may be an expectation of direct work with English language learners (ELLs) and/or students with IEPs. Graduate students will be placed in appropriate educational programs for at least 50 hours. In addition, graduate students will participate in a series of seminars focused on these classroom experiences. (Online version)
Note: This section is for students enrolled in online and onground programs only. This course has an onground field-based student teaching component and will meet synchronously online on the dates listed. All students need to be cleared through the NYCPS Personnel Eligibility Tracking System (PETS) process prior to the first day of the placement/classes.
EDUC994R-2R Extended Field Experiences 1 Online Staff TBD W 4:00-6:05 PM 6/26, 7/3, 7/10, 7/17, 7/24
This one-credit course provides working teachers, interns, and assistant teachers the opportunity to meet the mandated New York State regulations for certification. The State regulations require teacher candidates to work in an additional grade band level in a high needs public setting, according to the age band of their certification. In addition, there may be an expectation of direct work with English language learners (ELLs) and/or students with IEPs. Graduate students will be placed in appropriate educational programs for at least 50 hours. In addition, graduate students will participate in a series of seminars focused on these classroom experiences. (Online version)
Note: This section is for students enrolled in online and onground programs only. This course has an onground field-based student teaching component and will meet synchronously online on the dates listed. All students need to be cleared through the NYCPS Personnel Eligibility Tracking System (PETS) process prior to the first day of the placement/classes.
IMP2R-1R Collaborative Student Faculty Inquiry 0 Online Soyoung Park See mentor
The Collaborative Student-Faculty Inquiry is a one-semester small peer group option focused on a specific topic or issue. These topics, based on professional interests faculty would like to explore along with students, are posted each fall and spring. You identify a particular aspect of the topic or issue to investigate and, with your peers, determine a format in which to coordinate and present the findings. Students present their projects in mid-January or the week of graduation in May.

This IMP is for students in the fully online program only. This IMP will include synchronous meetings which will be determined by the IMP facilitator in collaboration with students.

Please fill out this form to confirm your IMP request by April 11th:
IMP Request Form

If your Program Director approves your request, you will be registered for this IMP by your SSA.

IMP3R-1R Mentored Directed Essay 0 Online Staff TBD See mentor
Students choosing to do a Mentored Directed Essay work with an assigned faculty mentor to design an essay that is based on existing, program-specific prepared questions. These questions are designed to help you think and write about the salient issues pertaining to your chosen area of study. Working with your mentor, you may adapt questions to support the distinctive needs of your professional growth, interests, and current work situation. This option is designed to provide structure and focus with maximum flexibility, and is intended to be completed within a single semester. This option is offered all semesters.

Please fill out this form to confirm your IMP request by April 11th:
IMP Request Form

If your Program Director approves your request, you will be registered for this IMP by your SSA.

Students will receive the name of their faculty mentor no later than the end of the add/drop period. Students completing a Mentored Directed Essay (MDE) should find the essay for their program and become familiar with the project before meeting with their mentors. To access the MDE, log into myBSC and go to Resources > Integrative Master's Project (IMP).

IS500R-1R Independent Study 0 Online Staff TBD See mentor
The Independent Study is an original work that you initiate, often growing out of a meaningful course assignment or an idea, question, or experience rooted in a fieldwork or work setting. Students work with a faculty mentor who has expertise in the particular area of study. The Independent Study usually includes two semesters of research and writing, and is most closely aligned with a traditional master’s thesis. Independent Studies are made accessible to the public though the Bank Street Library's online catalogue.

This IMP is for students who have not yet begun their Independent Study. Students continuing an Independent Study from a previous semester should contact their SSA for registration.

This IMP begins runs until the end of the Summer Long term. A second semester is optional.

To register, please fill out this form to confirm your IMP request by April 11th:
IMP Request Form.

If your Program Director approves your request, you will be registered for this IMP by your SSA.

IMPORTANT NOTE: In order to be registered for an Independent Study (IS500) you must have already secured a faculty mentor who has reviewed your Independent Study (IS) proposal and has committed to serve as your IS mentor.

Early Childhood Special Education Online Program

Courses within this program are for online students only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
EDUC521-1R Supporting Students & Families through Advocacy & Wraparound Planning 1 Online Jacob Dixon Not applicable
Participants will engage in a one credit, asynchronous learning experience designed to increase awareness, understanding and practices around advocacy and wraparound planning, with a focus on children with dis/abilities. Participants will critically examine tools, resources, and planning processes that can better support children and families’ successful engagement with schools and the larger community. Through engagement with interactive online materials and scholarly readings, participants will reflect on their own lived experience in understanding the role of an advocate. Participants will also reflect on and apply an understanding of an equitable, strengths-based, collaborative approach to ensure the academic and social needs of children are met. Participants will learn strategies in creating comprehensive holistic pathways of support that put children and families at the center.
This course is for students in the online programs only. It is self-paced and runs fully asynchronously.
EDUC525R-1R Assistive Technology as a Tool for Providing Educational Access 1 Online Mark Surabian W 7:00-9:05 PM 5/22, 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/26, 7/10
This course examines how technology can create opportunities for access and expression for learners, including children with variations in learning, sensory, communication, and physical development. Through readings, discussion, and experimenting with a variety of actual technologies, participants will strengthen their capacities to match such tools to learner needs in diverse learning environments and activities. Participants will reflect on classroom experiences to ascertain how accessibility for learners can be enhanced. They will consider broader issues of access and equity, as they deepen their understandings of how technology can assist in creating more inclusive learning environments.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online childhood and early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You may be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC539-1R Understanding Foundational Mathematics Concepts in Early Childhood Teaching 1 Online Jaime Palmer Not applicable
Teachers who are comfortable with mathematics develop learners who are comfortable with mathematics. This course offers experiences that support the development of five foundational math concepts:  Classifying and Sorting, Measurement, Numbers and Counting, Patterns and Reasoning, and Shapes and Spatial Relationships. Through a progression of investigative activities in each concept, participants will build conceptual understanding and reflect on their evolving competency through various artifacts that indicate evidence of their work and growth. Through a range of concrete developmental activities and connected readings, participants will learn to make sense of mathematical concepts for themselves as well as their students.
This course is for students in the online programs only. It is self-paced and runs fully asynchronously.
EDUC542R-1R Assessment and Instruction in Teaching Mathematics to Children with Learning Variations 2 Online Jaime Palmer TH 7:00-9:00 PM
This course has been designed to convey the process of clini-cal teaching. Through focus on an individual child, students will be concerned with the practical and theoretical aspects of learning style, language as a learning tool, perceptual abilities and disabilities, dyscalculia, and specific arithmetic disability. Students will learn to analyze children’s strengths and weaknesses and to describe and clearly communicate specific recommendations for the child’s parents and classroom teacher.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online childhood and early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You will be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC542R-2R Assessment and Instruction in Teaching Mathematics to Children with Learning Variations 2 Online Stephen Holzer TH 7:00-9:00 PM
This course has been designed to convey the process of clini-cal teaching. Through focus on an individual child, students will be concerned with the practical and theoretical aspects of learning style, language as a learning tool, perceptual abilities and disabilities, dyscalculia, and specific arithmetic disability. Students will learn to analyze children’s strengths and weaknesses and to describe and clearly communicate specific recommendations for the child’s parents and classroom teacher.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online childhood and early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You will be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC610-1R Computing For What? Exploring CS Education Visions for School Environments 1 Online Sara Vogel Not applicable
This one-credit asynchronous course exposes participants to concepts, practices, and perspectives guiding computing education, especially as it has been integrated into Early Childhood and Childhood school environments. Through engagement with practitioner-facing and scholarly readings and online materials in computing education, videos of classroom practice, curricular review, and interactive hands-on tinkering with computing tools, participants will define computing education, distinguishing it from other kinds of technology education. They will consider where and how computing practices and concepts are embedded in their own lives and in the lives of their students. They will explore rationale for computing education, including rationale that center equity, social justice, and critical perspectives on the technology industry. Participants will identify the values and visions that (might) drive their own practice and work in diverse early childhood and childhood settings, attending especially to visions that center problem-solving and expression through computational thinking and literacies.
This course is for students in the online programs only. It is self-paced and runs fully asynchronously.
EDUC803R-1R Developmental Variations 2 Online Sean O'Shea T 7:00-9:00 PM
This course is designed to increase participants’ awareness and understanding of the educational, social, cultural, linguistic and developmental implications of disability from historical, legal, and socio-political perspectives. The course will critically examine state and federal special education and disability laws and regulations and their implementation across a range of settings including their intersection with issues of race, class, language and gender. There is an emphasis on understanding how disability is socially constructed at the levels of family, community, school, and the larger society.  Participants apply an understanding of developmental variations to analyze and create accessible learning experiences for children. Prerequisite: EDUC 500 or permission of instructor.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online childhood and early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You will be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC803R-2R Developmental Variations 2 Online Kristen Kaelin T 7:00-9:00 PM
This course is designed to increase participants’ awareness and understanding of the educational, social, cultural, linguistic and developmental implications of disability from historical, legal, and socio-political perspectives. The course will critically examine state and federal special education and disability laws and regulations and their implementation across a range of settings including their intersection with issues of race, class, language and gender. There is an emphasis on understanding how disability is socially constructed at the levels of family, community, school, and the larger society.  Participants apply an understanding of developmental variations to analyze and create accessible learning experiences for children. Prerequisite: EDUC 500 or permission of instructor.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online childhood and early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You will be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC823R-1R Play Techniques for Early Childhood Settings 1 Online Kate Ascetta M 7:00-9:05 PM 6/10, 6/17, 6/24, 7/8, 7/15, 7/22
This course explores play as central to supporting the social, emotional, and cognitive development of children with varying developmental and learning variations.  Participants will learn a variety of therapeutic play techniques that promote self-regulation, self-esteem, and emotional expression, and development across domains. This course is appropriate for general and special education teachers, parents, caregivers, child life specialists, social workers, therapists and counselors. Participants are required to have prior coursework focused on child development and on developmental variations. Prerequisite: EDUC 803 or with permission of instructor.
Note: This section is for students enrolled in fully online early childhood programs. This course will meet synchronously and asynchronously. You must be available for synchronous sessions each week on the day/time listed in the schedule. You may be expected to participate in course content for the duration of the semester, except for holidays. Your instructor will share the specific synchronous dates at your first session.
EDUC994R-1R Extended Field Experiences 1 Online Staff TBD T 4:00-6:05 PM 6/25, 7/2, 7/9, 7/16, 7/23
This one-credit course provides working teachers, interns, and assistant teachers the opportunity to meet the mandated New York State regulations for certification. The State regulations require teacher candidates to work in an additional grade band level in a high needs public setting, according to the age band of their certification. In addition, there may be an expectation of direct work with English language learners (ELLs) and/or students with IEPs. Graduate students will be placed in appropriate educational programs for at least 50 hours. In addition, graduate students will participate in a series of seminars focused on these classroom experiences. (Online version)
Note: This section is for students enrolled in online and onground programs only. This course has an onground field-based student teaching component and will meet synchronously online on the dates listed. All students need to be cleared through the NYCPS Personnel Eligibility Tracking System (PETS) process prior to the first day of the placement/classes.
EDUC994R-2R Extended Field Experiences 1 Online Staff TBD W 4:00-6:05 PM 6/26, 7/3, 7/10, 7/17, 7/24
This one-credit course provides working teachers, interns, and assistant teachers the opportunity to meet the mandated New York State regulations for certification. The State regulations require teacher candidates to work in an additional grade band level in a high needs public setting, according to the age band of their certification. In addition, there may be an expectation of direct work with English language learners (ELLs) and/or students with IEPs. Graduate students will be placed in appropriate educational programs for at least 50 hours. In addition, graduate students will participate in a series of seminars focused on these classroom experiences. (Online version)
Note: This section is for students enrolled in online and onground programs only. This course has an onground field-based student teaching component and will meet synchronously online on the dates listed. All students need to be cleared through the NYCPS Personnel Eligibility Tracking System (PETS) process prior to the first day of the placement/classes.

Adolescent Special Education Teaching Fellows: Cohort 37

These courses are for students in the New York City Teaching Fellows: Cohort 37 Program only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
EDUC837-1 Integrative Master’s Project 1 Shawna Hansford See mentor 5/15, 6/4, 6/11, 6/18, 6/25
The Integrative Master’s Project (IMP) is one of the three major components of your degree requirements. As the culminating component, it is a significant, academically rigorous body of work that integrates many facets of your experiences at Bank Street and in the field, and applies theoretical knowledge to your current and future work as an educator. The process of writing the IMP is intended to further your professional growth through inquiry, reflection, and integration. The form and content of each IMP varies according to specific program requirements.

This IMP will be hybrid, meeting on campus and online (synchronous) on the dates listed. This course is for students in C37, Teaching Fellows, only.

on campus - 5/15 (8:15-9pm), 5/26 (IMP share, 5:15-8pm)
online (synchronous) - 6/4 (5:15-6:30), 6/11 (optional, 5:15-6:30), 6/18 (optional, 5:15-6:30)
Individual consultations are available upon request.

EDUC8612-1 Formal and Informal Assessment of Adolescents with Disabilities 2 701 Raul Palacios TW 5:15-8:00 PM 5/14, 5/15, 5/21, 5/22, 5/28, 5/29 6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26
This course is designed to develop an understanding of formal and informal assessment techniques used to identify the learning needs of adolescents with disabilities.  Students will become familiar with commonly used psychological and achievement tests as well as understand the need for adaptive measures during the evaluation process. The emphasis is on how to use both formal and informal assessment data to develop instructional plans to meet the unique needs of adolescents with a range of abilities and challenges.  The historical as well as current legal and ethical considerations, appropriate practices and limitations when working with students of diverse backgrounds and their families will be a theme throughout the course.  Topics such as student self-assessment, vocational assessment, exit portfolios, alternative assessment, transition planning and wraparound services will be discussed with a focus on advocacy and equity. (Pending approval of the Program Review and Curriculum Committee)

This class will be hybrid, meeting oncampus and online (synchronous) on the dates listed. This course is for students in C37, Teaching Fellows, only.

Oncampus dates are 5/15, 5/22, 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26
Online synchronous dates are - 5/14, 5/21, 5/28

Adolescent Special Education Teaching Fellows: Cohort 38

These courses are for students in the New York City Teaching Fellows: Cohort 38 Program only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
EDUC532-1 Human Development 2 701 Genevieve Lowry M-F 11:00-3:00 PM June 18-28
This course focuses on understanding, teaching, and meeting the needs of children and adolescents through emerging adulthood. The interactions between physical growth and social, emotional, and cognitive development will be an organizing focus in the course. Participants will analyze critically different developmental theories in relation to their own educational settings and experience. Participants explore the social and educational implications of a wide range of learning and behavioral variations in the context of family, school lives, community and society. Issues related to identity—self and other, dependence and autonomy, race, class, gender, language, religion, sexuality, power, ability, and disability—will be recurring themes. Participants will investigate topics and issues through a combination of readings, observations, interviews, case studies and discussion.
This course will meet oncampus on the dates listed, except holidays. This course is for students in C38, Teaching Fellows, only.
EDUC651F-1 Special Study: Introduction to Education Systems (New Teacher Advisory) 3 705 Jessica Charles MTThF 8:00-10:30AM See Note Below
This introductory course explores various Education Systems across the New York City Public School (NYCPS) landscape in light of the emerging needs of new Teaching Fellows. It is meant to educate and support our newest NYCPS teachers as they prepare to enter the classroom, get certified, and begin lifelong careers in education. Topics include:

Understanding the geography of New York City schools and transportation options

Obtaining school data to make informed decisions and to serve students and families

Hiring, Interviewing, and Certification processes (City and State)\

Navigating the United Federation of Teachers (UFT) as an early career teacher

Introduction to common school structures (e.g. staff meetings, grade-level teams, professional learning communities)

Payroll structures including salary scale and steps, resources for understanding benefits, (e.g. retirement, TDA, etc.)

Getting supplies, using preparation periods, understanding absence policies and other administrative structures

Introduction to the Special Education Students Information System (SESIS) and practice interpreting IEPs

Practicing self-care for longevity in the teaching profession
May 30, June 3, 4, 5, 6, June 7 (5:30-8:00, online synchronous). June 11, 13 (asynchronous). June 17, 18, 20, 21 (8-10:30 am on-ground synchronous). June 23, 25, 27, 29, July 1 (asynchronous).
EDUC700-1 Classroom Culture and Instructional Methods 3 Staff TBD Not applicable

Early Childhood General Education Advanced Standing

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
EDUC505A-1A Language Acquisition and Learning in a Linguistically Diverse Society 2 Online Jillian Hakemian W 4:45-6:45 PM
Based on the belief that language is an essential foundation for learning, this course addresses the typical processes of language acquisition in mono- and multilingual learners. Participants will examine theories of language acquisition and the role that caregivers and educators play in the development of language. In addition, participants will analyze historical, political, educational, social, and emotional factors that influence the socially constructed hierarchies of language varieties. A significant part of the course will be devoted to students who learn English as an additional language. Participants will learn how to use assessment of mono- and multilingual learners to identify appropriate instructional practices for social and academic language use in a range of educational settings. Course participants will also learn about ways of collaborating with families, colleagues, specialists, administrators, and interpreters. For the Early Childhood Advanced Standing Program Only

This course is for students in the ECAS program only.

Please note: This course meets fully online. Your instructor will share more details with you at the start of the semester.

TESL660A-1A TESOL Research & Methodologies (Grades PreK-6) 3 408/410; 303; 701 Stan Chu, Stephen Holzer, Benjamin Martin M 4:45-7:30 PM
This course explores TESOL methodologies to inform the teaching of English as a new language in grades PreK-6. The course will provide participants with a foundation for thinking about English as a new language (ENL) instruction as being grounded in a deep understanding of both learner and context.  Participants will develop an understanding of how student identity, language proficiency levels (entering, emerging, transitional, expanding, and commanding), classroom culture and curriculum, and local and state assessments all impact planning and instruction for ENLs.  Using this grounding, participants will determine appropriate language materials, instructional technology, translanguaging strategies, environmental supports, and effective ENL service models to differentiate for the diverse listening, speaking, reading, and writing abilities and needs of their emergent bilingual students. Participants will develop skills in collaborating with a range of colleagues to create inclusive learning environments and effective classroom management strategies aimed at integrating emergent bilingual students, including those with developmental variations, fully into their classroom communities. The course will explore how participants can advocate for an integrated and flexible role of ENL service delivery, preparing participants to design both stand-alone and integrated ENL experiences, as well as differentiating existing curriculum to better meet the needs of students. Prerequisite: TESL 870.
Note: This course is only for students in the Early Childhood Advanced Standing Program.
This course is for students in the ECAS program only. Note: This class will run in three modules. Module 1 is focused on Science with Stan Chu and will meet from 4:45-6:45 on 5/13, 5/20, 6/3, 6/10. Module 2 is focused on Math with Stephen Holzer and will meet from 4:45-6:45 on 6/17, 6/24, 7/1, 7/8. Module 3 is focused on Music and Movement with Ben Martin and will meet from 4:45-7:30 on 7/15, 7/22, 7/29.

Progressive Leadership Program Online: Cohort 50 & 51

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD530R-1R Education Policy, Advocacy, and Law 3 Online Ron Woo M 6:30-8:30 PM
Education policy is examined in the context of historical, philosophical, economic, sociocultural, political, and legal perspectives. Leadership theory and practices that create learning environments responsive to the multicultural constituencies of schools, as well as the laws that sustain them, are analyzed.
LEAD621R-1R Fiscal Management for Educational Leaders 1 Online Danielle Kolker TH 6:00-7:30 PM
This course is designed to explore school-based budgeting and fiscal management. The course will provide an overview of the various resources that schools receive and the rules that govern their use. There will be examples of how various schools use these resources, and a discussion of some of the considerations that school leaders may need to take into account in order for them to effectively implement the educational goals and objectives for their schools.
PLPF500-1 Progressive Leadership Program Portfolio 0 Staff TBD See mentor
Progressive Leadership students will continue to strengthen their educational leadership knowledge and skills through coursework and fieldwork. In conference group and with the support of their advisor, students will gather artifacts that reflect their learning and development in relation to the PSEL standards. At the end of the program, each student will present a comprehensive portfolio of his or her learning experiences. This portfolio meets the program’s Integrative Master’s Project requirement. There is a fee associated with this class to cover administrative costs and grading.

Early Childhood Leadership

Courses within this program are for online students only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD530E-1E Education Policy, Advocacy, and Law 3 Online Mark Nagasawa M 7:00-9:00 PM
Education policy is examined in the context of historical, philosophical, economic, sociocultural, political, and legal perspectives. Leadership theory and practices that create learning environments responsive to the multicultural constituencies of schools, as well as the laws that sustain them, are analyzed.
LEAD537E-1E Organizational Development: Implications for Educational Leadership 3 Mark Nagasawa, Wendy Pollock T 7:00-9:00 PM
This course examines theory, research, and practice related to organizational development. It covers a wide range of issues related to capacity-building, school vision and culture, and problem solving, and focuses on the relationship between school management and instructional leadership. Students have opportunities to integrate theory and research with administrative practice through readings, small-group work, simulation experiences, observations, interviews, protocols, and case studies. For students in the Early Childhood Leadership Advanced Certificate Online Program only.

Future School Leaders Academy

Courses within this program are for FSLA students only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD535-1F Foundations of Educational Leadership: Organizational Development 1 Andrew Selesnick M-Th 2:00-5:00 PM July 8 - 11
This course examines theory, research, and practice concerning organizational development. The course provides opportunities for students to integrate theory and research with administrative practice through the use of such methods as simulation experiences, readings, observations, and interviews.
LEAD630-1F Law for School Leaders 3 Michael Lambert M-Th 9:00-12:00 PM July 8 - 18
The aim of this course is to familiarize both practicing and prospective administrators, supervisors, and school leadership personnel with the basic legal principles governing the structure and operation of school settings and the legal problems encountered in the day-to-day operation of schools. The broad general principles of school governance as determined by statute and case law are emphasized.
LEAD870-1F Special Education Leadership: The District Perspective 1 Staff TBD M-Th 2:00-5:00 PM July 15 - 18
Strong leadership at the district level is essential if schools are to become positive and successful learning environments for diverse learners, including children with disabilities and those at risk of failure. This course covers issues that enhance or create obstacles for inclusive schools and communities. Issues of equity are evident in most school districts and challenge educators to transform educational environments and processes to meet diverse needs. The course will address the issue of “achievement gaps” as well as links between social class and achievement in schools.

LEAP Program

Courses within this program are for LEAP students only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD537L-1L Organizational Development: Implications for Educational Leadership 3 Jae Cho M-F 9:00-5:00 PM
This course examines theory, research, and practice related to organizational development. It covers a wide range of issues related to capacity-building, school vision and culture, and problem solving, and focuses on the relationship between school management and instructional leadership. Students have opportunities to integrate theory and research with administrative practice through readings, small-group work, simulation experiences, observations, interviews, protocols, and case studies.
LEAD537L-2L Organizational Development: Implications for Educational Leadership 3 Staff TBD M-F 9:00-5:00 PM
This course examines theory, research, and practice related to organizational development. It covers a wide range of issues related to capacity-building, school vision and culture, and problem solving, and focuses on the relationship between school management and instructional leadership. Students have opportunities to integrate theory and research with administrative practice through readings, small-group work, simulation experiences, observations, interviews, protocols, and case studies.
LEAD537L-3L Organizational Development: Implications for Educational Leadership 3 Jacqueline Grossman M-F 9:00-5:00 PM
This course examines theory, research, and practice related to organizational development. It covers a wide range of issues related to capacity-building, school vision and culture, and problem solving, and focuses on the relationship between school management and instructional leadership. Students have opportunities to integrate theory and research with administrative practice through readings, small-group work, simulation experiences, observations, interviews, protocols, and case studies.
LEAD537L-4L Organizational Development: Implications for Educational Leadership 3 Jameela Horton M-F 9:00-5:00 PM
This course examines theory, research, and practice related to organizational development. It covers a wide range of issues related to capacity-building, school vision and culture, and problem solving, and focuses on the relationship between school management and instructional leadership. Students have opportunities to integrate theory and research with administrative practice through readings, small-group work, simulation experiences, observations, interviews, protocols, and case studies.
LEAD873L-1L Special Education Leadership: Meeting the Needs of all Students 1 Jae Cho M-F 9:00-5:00 PM
Leaders are expected to create inclusive learning environments where all students, including students with disabilities and students who struggle, feel safe and have access to high quality, effective instruction. In this course graduate students will examine the history of the construct of disability and the disability rights movement and their impact on the school experiences of students with disabilities and their families. This course will also explore how markers of identity such as race, class, gender, and language intersect with disability. Graduate students will integrate their experiences and learning to reimagine and design a learning environment that provides support and promotes equity for all learners.
LEAD873L-2L Special Education Leadership: Meeting the Needs of all Students 1 Staff TBD M-F 9:00-5:00 PM
Leaders are expected to create inclusive learning environments where all students, including students with disabilities and students who struggle, feel safe and have access to high quality, effective instruction. In this course graduate students will examine the history of the construct of disability and the disability rights movement and their impact on the school experiences of students with disabilities and their families. This course will also explore how markers of identity such as race, class, gender, and language intersect with disability. Graduate students will integrate their experiences and learning to reimagine and design a learning environment that provides support and promotes equity for all learners.
LEAD873L-3L Special Education Leadership: Meeting the Needs of all Students 1 Jacqueline Grossman M-F 9:00-5:00 PM
Leaders are expected to create inclusive learning environments where all students, including students with disabilities and students who struggle, feel safe and have access to high quality, effective instruction. In this course graduate students will examine the history of the construct of disability and the disability rights movement and their impact on the school experiences of students with disabilities and their families. This course will also explore how markers of identity such as race, class, gender, and language intersect with disability. Graduate students will integrate their experiences and learning to reimagine and design a learning environment that provides support and promotes equity for all learners.
LEAD873L-4L Special Education Leadership: Meeting the Needs of all Students 1 Jameela Horton M-F 9:00-5:00 PM
Leaders are expected to create inclusive learning environments where all students, including students with disabilities and students who struggle, feel safe and have access to high quality, effective instruction. In this course graduate students will examine the history of the construct of disability and the disability rights movement and their impact on the school experiences of students with disabilities and their families. This course will also explore how markers of identity such as race, class, gender, and language intersect with disability. Graduate students will integrate their experiences and learning to reimagine and design a learning environment that provides support and promotes equity for all learners.
LEAD912L-1L Leadership Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 2 Jae Cho M-F 9:00-5:00 PM
This course meets New York State certification requirements for School Building Leadership (SBL) internship experiences. Through close work with a faculty advisor and peers, participants apply their learning from coursework to their field experiences, integrating theory and practice as they reflect on their own professional development. Interns work with a site supervisor and are given substantial school-based responsibilities that involve direct interaction and involvement with staff, students, families, and community leaders. Participants develop the capacity to build and support a positive school culture, build teams, enlist collaboration, and plan and sustain change efforts. Graduate students in advisement participate in small-group sessions with their advisors over 18 months. Participants also serve in a summer internship at a site that is different from their usual work site. At the end of supervised fieldwork, each candidate presents a comprehensive portfolio of internship experiences which meets the program’s Integrative Master’s Project requirement.
LEAD912L-2L Leadership Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 2 Staff TBD M-F 9:00-5:00 PM
This course meets New York State certification requirements for School Building Leadership (SBL) internship experiences. Through close work with a faculty advisor and peers, participants apply their learning from coursework to their field experiences, integrating theory and practice as they reflect on their own professional development. Interns work with a site supervisor and are given substantial school-based responsibilities that involve direct interaction and involvement with staff, students, families, and community leaders. Participants develop the capacity to build and support a positive school culture, build teams, enlist collaboration, and plan and sustain change efforts. Graduate students in advisement participate in small-group sessions with their advisors over 18 months. Participants also serve in a summer internship at a site that is different from their usual work site. At the end of supervised fieldwork, each candidate presents a comprehensive portfolio of internship experiences which meets the program’s Integrative Master’s Project requirement.
LEAD912L-3L Leadership Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 2 Jacqueline Grossman M-F 9:00-5:00 PM
This course meets New York State certification requirements for School Building Leadership (SBL) internship experiences. Through close work with a faculty advisor and peers, participants apply their learning from coursework to their field experiences, integrating theory and practice as they reflect on their own professional development. Interns work with a site supervisor and are given substantial school-based responsibilities that involve direct interaction and involvement with staff, students, families, and community leaders. Participants develop the capacity to build and support a positive school culture, build teams, enlist collaboration, and plan and sustain change efforts. Graduate students in advisement participate in small-group sessions with their advisors over 18 months. Participants also serve in a summer internship at a site that is different from their usual work site. At the end of supervised fieldwork, each candidate presents a comprehensive portfolio of internship experiences which meets the program’s Integrative Master’s Project requirement.
LEAD912L-4L Leadership Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 2 Jameela Horton M-F 9:00-5:00 PM
This course meets New York State certification requirements for School Building Leadership (SBL) internship experiences. Through close work with a faculty advisor and peers, participants apply their learning from coursework to their field experiences, integrating theory and practice as they reflect on their own professional development. Interns work with a site supervisor and are given substantial school-based responsibilities that involve direct interaction and involvement with staff, students, families, and community leaders. Participants develop the capacity to build and support a positive school culture, build teams, enlist collaboration, and plan and sustain change efforts. Graduate students in advisement participate in small-group sessions with their advisors over 18 months. Participants also serve in a summer internship at a site that is different from their usual work site. At the end of supervised fieldwork, each candidate presents a comprehensive portfolio of internship experiences which meets the program’s Integrative Master’s Project requirement.

New Leaders - Cohort 1

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD530W-1W Education Policy, Advocacy, and Law 3 Online Derrick Williams TH 6:00-8:30 PM
Education policy is examined in the context of historical, philosophical, economic, sociocultural, political, and legal perspectives. Leadership theory and practices that create learning environments responsive to the multicultural constituencies of schools, as well as the laws that sustain them, are analyzed. This section for National Aspiring Principals students only.
LEAD530W-2W Education Policy, Advocacy, and Law 3 Online Tammy Holloway TH 6:00-8:30 PM
Education policy is examined in the context of historical, philosophical, economic, sociocultural, political, and legal perspectives. Leadership theory and practices that create learning environments responsive to the multicultural constituencies of schools, as well as the laws that sustain them, are analyzed. This section for National Aspiring Principals students only.
LEAD539W-1W Education Resource Management 3 Online Sebrina Lindsay-Law T 6:00-8:30 PM
This course prepares you as Fellows to plan for the principalship by examining the role of the principal as an operational leader who manages staff, facilities, budgets, and district strategy to align with the school’s vision, mission, and values. 
The course begins by defining the process and purpose of school improvement planning within operational leadership. This type of strategic planning involves engaging critical stakeholders, analyzing data, and performing an equity audit of how your school is performing across all student groups. 
You will then move from school improvement planning to learning to manage your greatest resource—the people in the school building. Managing human resources means recruiting, selecting, onboarding, and retaining aligned staff who will realize the vision for excellence and equity in your school community.
Module 2 builds on your understanding of resource equity and operational leadership by discussing the management of time and money. First, you will look at how each minute of the school's master schedule, and your personal schedule, can be used to maximize all aspects of teaching and learning and prioritize equitable access for underserved students. Then we will turn to school finance and budgeting. You will be prepared to ensure that the school’s financial resources are supporting school goals and positively impacting the student experience.
Finally, in Module 3, you will focus on managing the physical school building to facilitate excellence in learning and teaching. How do you manage facilities to create a student experience where all students are successful and feel safe, valued, and honored? The course concludes with a focus on your role as an advocate. A key aspect of operational leadership is communicating with district leaders and stakeholders to advocate for the resources of your students, staff, families, and community. This section is for students in the National Aspiring Principals program.
LEAD539W-2W Education Resource Management 3 Online D'Andre Weaver T 6:00-8:30 PM
This course prepares you as Fellows to plan for the principalship by examining the role of the principal as an operational leader who manages staff, facilities, budgets, and district strategy to align with the school’s vision, mission, and values. 
The course begins by defining the process and purpose of school improvement planning within operational leadership. This type of strategic planning involves engaging critical stakeholders, analyzing data, and performing an equity audit of how your school is performing across all student groups. 
You will then move from school improvement planning to learning to manage your greatest resource—the people in the school building. Managing human resources means recruiting, selecting, onboarding, and retaining aligned staff who will realize the vision for excellence and equity in your school community.
Module 2 builds on your understanding of resource equity and operational leadership by discussing the management of time and money. First, you will look at how each minute of the school's master schedule, and your personal schedule, can be used to maximize all aspects of teaching and learning and prioritize equitable access for underserved students. Then we will turn to school finance and budgeting. You will be prepared to ensure that the school’s financial resources are supporting school goals and positively impacting the student experience.
Finally, in Module 3, you will focus on managing the physical school building to facilitate excellence in learning and teaching. How do you manage facilities to create a student experience where all students are successful and feel safe, valued, and honored? The course concludes with a focus on your role as an advocate. A key aspect of operational leadership is communicating with district leaders and stakeholders to advocate for the resources of your students, staff, families, and community. This section is for students in the National Aspiring Principals program.

New Leaders - Cohort 2

For students in the New Leaders Cohort 2 program only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD530W-3W Education Policy, Advocacy, and Law 3 Online Anita Walls TH 6:00-8:30 PM
Education policy is examined in the context of historical, philosophical, economic, sociocultural, political, and legal perspectives. Leadership theory and practices that create learning environments responsive to the multicultural constituencies of schools, as well as the laws that sustain them, are analyzed. This section for National Aspiring Principals students only.
LEAD530W-4W Education Policy, Advocacy, and Law 3 Online Johan Powell TH 6:00-8:30 PM
Education policy is examined in the context of historical, philosophical, economic, sociocultural, political, and legal perspectives. Leadership theory and practices that create learning environments responsive to the multicultural constituencies of schools, as well as the laws that sustain them, are analyzed. This section for National Aspiring Principals students only.
LEAD530W-5W Education Policy, Advocacy, and Law 3 Online Cynthia Isales TH 6:00-8:30 PM
Education policy is examined in the context of historical, philosophical, economic, sociocultural, political, and legal perspectives. Leadership theory and practices that create learning environments responsive to the multicultural constituencies of schools, as well as the laws that sustain them, are analyzed. This section for National Aspiring Principals students only.
LEAD539W-3W Education Resource Management 3 Online Marcus Brannon T 6:00-8:30 PM
This course prepares you as Fellows to plan for the principalship by examining the role of the principal as an operational leader who manages staff, facilities, budgets, and district strategy to align with the school’s vision, mission, and values. 
The course begins by defining the process and purpose of school improvement planning within operational leadership. This type of strategic planning involves engaging critical stakeholders, analyzing data, and performing an equity audit of how your school is performing across all student groups. 
You will then move from school improvement planning to learning to manage your greatest resource—the people in the school building. Managing human resources means recruiting, selecting, onboarding, and retaining aligned staff who will realize the vision for excellence and equity in your school community.
Module 2 builds on your understanding of resource equity and operational leadership by discussing the management of time and money. First, you will look at how each minute of the school's master schedule, and your personal schedule, can be used to maximize all aspects of teaching and learning and prioritize equitable access for underserved students. Then we will turn to school finance and budgeting. You will be prepared to ensure that the school’s financial resources are supporting school goals and positively impacting the student experience.
Finally, in Module 3, you will focus on managing the physical school building to facilitate excellence in learning and teaching. How do you manage facilities to create a student experience where all students are successful and feel safe, valued, and honored? The course concludes with a focus on your role as an advocate. A key aspect of operational leadership is communicating with district leaders and stakeholders to advocate for the resources of your students, staff, families, and community. This section is for students in the National Aspiring Principals program.
LEAD539W-4W Education Resource Management 3 Online Kelvin Moore T 6:00-8:30 PM
This course prepares you as Fellows to plan for the principalship by examining the role of the principal as an operational leader who manages staff, facilities, budgets, and district strategy to align with the school’s vision, mission, and values. 
The course begins by defining the process and purpose of school improvement planning within operational leadership. This type of strategic planning involves engaging critical stakeholders, analyzing data, and performing an equity audit of how your school is performing across all student groups. 
You will then move from school improvement planning to learning to manage your greatest resource—the people in the school building. Managing human resources means recruiting, selecting, onboarding, and retaining aligned staff who will realize the vision for excellence and equity in your school community.
Module 2 builds on your understanding of resource equity and operational leadership by discussing the management of time and money. First, you will look at how each minute of the school's master schedule, and your personal schedule, can be used to maximize all aspects of teaching and learning and prioritize equitable access for underserved students. Then we will turn to school finance and budgeting. You will be prepared to ensure that the school’s financial resources are supporting school goals and positively impacting the student experience.
Finally, in Module 3, you will focus on managing the physical school building to facilitate excellence in learning and teaching. How do you manage facilities to create a student experience where all students are successful and feel safe, valued, and honored? The course concludes with a focus on your role as an advocate. A key aspect of operational leadership is communicating with district leaders and stakeholders to advocate for the resources of your students, staff, families, and community. This section is for students in the National Aspiring Principals program.
LEAD539W-5W Education Resource Management 3 Online Louis Garcia T 6:00-8:30 PM
This course prepares you as Fellows to plan for the principalship by examining the role of the principal as an operational leader who manages staff, facilities, budgets, and district strategy to align with the school’s vision, mission, and values. 
The course begins by defining the process and purpose of school improvement planning within operational leadership. This type of strategic planning involves engaging critical stakeholders, analyzing data, and performing an equity audit of how your school is performing across all student groups. 
You will then move from school improvement planning to learning to manage your greatest resource—the people in the school building. Managing human resources means recruiting, selecting, onboarding, and retaining aligned staff who will realize the vision for excellence and equity in your school community.
Module 2 builds on your understanding of resource equity and operational leadership by discussing the management of time and money. First, you will look at how each minute of the school's master schedule, and your personal schedule, can be used to maximize all aspects of teaching and learning and prioritize equitable access for underserved students. Then we will turn to school finance and budgeting. You will be prepared to ensure that the school’s financial resources are supporting school goals and positively impacting the student experience.
Finally, in Module 3, you will focus on managing the physical school building to facilitate excellence in learning and teaching. How do you manage facilities to create a student experience where all students are successful and feel safe, valued, and honored? The course concludes with a focus on your role as an advocate. A key aspect of operational leadership is communicating with district leaders and stakeholders to advocate for the resources of your students, staff, families, and community. This section is for students in the National Aspiring Principals program.

School District Leadership Online Program

Courses within this program are for online students only.

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
LEAD861R-1S Leading a School District I 1 Online Alice Gottlieb, Brian Monahan T 5:00-6:00 PM TBD
This course focuses on the key constituencies in a district and the different relationships that exist among them. It includes understanding the district’s vision, how it was developed, and how it is sustained. The course also examines a district’s demographic and achievement data.
LEAD862R-1S Leading a School District II 1 Online Alice Gottlieb, Brian Monahan T 5:00-6:00 PM TBD
This course looks at the varied roles and responsibilities of the superintendent/district leader and ties them to the challenges of creating and sustaining dynamic, humane, effective learning communities. It emphasizes the ways that district leaders’ decisions—in such spheres as instructional policy, planning, fiscal and human resources, facilities, legal and equity issues, accountability, and external relationships—affect schools’ capacity to engage students and strengthen achievement.
LEAD863R-1S Leading a School District III 1 Online Alice Gottlieb, Brian Monahan T 5:00-6:00 PM TBD
This course focuses on how human and financial resources are allocated in a district to support the instructional program and the goals of the superintendent and school board.
LEAD864R-1S Leading a School District IV 1 Online Alice Gottlieb, Brian Monahan T 5:00-6:00 PM TBD
This course focuses on examining a district’s budget from multiple points of view: theoretical, conceptual, and practical. Participants will become familiar with all phases of the budget process, from its inception to its implementation throughout a district. Content will be closely aligned, whenever possible, with the “real world” budgets currently in place in districts.
LEAD870R-1S Special Education Leadership: The District Perspective 1 Online Alice Gottlieb, Brian Monahan T 5:00-6:00 PM TBD
Strong leadership at the district level is essential if schools are to become positive and successful learning environments for diverse learners, including children with disabilities and those at risk of failure. This course covers issues that enhance or create obstacles for inclusive schools and communities. Issues of equity are evident in most school districts and challenge educators to transform educational environments and processes to meet diverse needs. The course will address the issue of “achievement gaps” as well as links between social class and achievement in schools.
LEAD908R-1S School District Leadership Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement 3 Online Nancy Mann See mentor
Fieldwork in an appropriate setting with supervision and advisement.

Matriculation Maintenance

Section Title Credits Rooms Instructor Days/Times Dates Status
MMNT500R-1R Matriculation Maintenance 0 Online Staff TBD Not applicable
A degree can only be conferred for currently enrolled students. If students are not registered for classes, the Integrative Master's Project, or supervised fieldwork in the semester they intend to graduate, they must register for matriculation maintenance by the end of the add/drop period. This situation might occur, for example, if students are completing coursework for a prior class in which they received a grade of Incomplete.